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I've written a rather simple(ish) stack implementation that would automatically grow its internal array buffer if needed.

For that, I'd naturally use realloc - It works, however, all array elements are ordered reverse after the realloc() call.

The code in question:

This example will trigger said behaviour:

#include "pd/strlib.h"
#include "pd/stack.h"
#include "pd/memory.h"
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int index = 0;
    char* buffer;
    pd_stack_t* stc = pd_stack_new();
    pd_stack_push(stc, "blue");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "green");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "red");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "yellow");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "pink");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "olive");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "beige");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "gold");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "grey");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "lime");
    pd_stack_push(stc, "khaki");
    while((index++) != 500)
    {
        pd_stack_push(stc, "__random_value__");
    }
    buffer = (char*)malloc(pd_stack_size(stc));
    pd_stack_dump_tomem(stc, buffer, 1);
    fprintf(stdout, "%s", buffer);
    return 0;
}

I'm really clueless about this. Help please!

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line 81 looks like a bug: free(gct->ptr_stack[gct->stackcount]); –  akonsu Aug 17 '10 at 14:18
    
@akonsu, there are a lot of problems, check out pd_stack_pop_index - looks like homework. –  user410344 Aug 17 '10 at 14:20
    
@akonsu: can you elaborate please? @evilclown: I'm sorry to disappoint you, but I did write this in my spare time. It's not homework. –  user350814 Aug 17 '10 at 14:23
    
well, gct->stackcount is the number of items in the stack. gct->ptr_stack contains the stack data. the last element in the stack is at index gct->stackcount - 1 because in C array indexes start at 0. there are many other problems such as the one that evilclown mentioned. –  akonsu Aug 17 '10 at 14:27
    
may i recommend a book: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_C_Programming_Language_%28book%29 it explains well why you should not write code such as if((gct->stackcount) != 0) and should write if(gct->stackcount > 0) –  akonsu Aug 17 '10 at 14:38
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like pd_stack_dump_tomem starts its index at stack size and decrements to 0, appending the elements in reverse order.

Change it to start at 0 and iterate to stack size

(It seems realloc is unrelated)

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed it is. I wonder why I didn't notice it earlier... –  user350814 Aug 17 '10 at 14:24
    
@nebukadnezzar: so you wanted the stack dumped in the order items were pushed instead of the order they will be popped off the stack? –  Michael Burr Aug 17 '10 at 15:10
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You have some fundamental problems with the stack code, so I don't think the realloc() is your issue. Here are some of the things you should look into and address:

  • the top item on the stack (when it's not empty) is pointed to by (gct->stackcount - 1), since in pd_stack_push() you store a new item in gct->ptr_stack[gct->stackcount] then increment stackcount. However, when you're accessing the top item, you use the incorrect offset, gct->ptr_stack[gct->stackcount] instead of gct->ptr_stack[gct->stackcount - 1]. In particular, in pd_stack_pop(), you free that item which will might be corrupting the heap since there's not a valid pointer in that stack location.

  • in pd_stack_push() you call realloc() every time a new item is pushed on to the stack. This won't necessarily corrupt anything or cause a defect, but it's unnecessary - especially since you always ask for the same size allocation. In other words, your realloc() calls should be nops except for the first one.

  • pd_stack_pop_index() doesn't even make sense unless you only ever pop the top item (in which case pd_stack_pop() should be used). You free something potentially in the middle of the stack, then decrement the stackcount, essentially making the top item (which is not necessarily what you've freed) inaccessible. The item in the middle of the stack that was freed will now be accessed/freed again when it's popped (assuming that pd_stack_pop() is fixed).

share|improve this answer
    
Now that you mention, I couldn't agree more. It's indeed more broken than usable. Ah well, it was fun while it lasted! :-) –  user350814 Aug 17 '10 at 15:22
    
@nebukadnezzar - it has bugs, but I don't think it's so broken as to be useless. It just needs fixed (as all new code does)... –  Michael Burr Aug 17 '10 at 16:28
    
I guess so. I've flagged it as experimental (again), though. I'll just have to test it further... –  user350814 Aug 17 '10 at 17:24
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