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I'm working on a multi-site CMS that has a notion of cross-publication among sites. Several types of content (Articles, Events, Bios, etc) can be associated with many Sites and Sites can have many pieces of content. The many-to-many association between content pieces and sites must also support a couple common attributes for each content item associated -- the notion of site origination (is this the original site upon which the content appeared?) as well as a notion of "primary" and "secondary" content status for a given piece of content on a given associated site.

My idea has been to create a polymorphic join model called ContentAssociation, but I'm having trouble getting the polymorphic associations to behave as I expect them to, and I'm wondering if perhaps I'm going about this all wrong.

Here's my setup for the join table and the models:

create_table "content_associations", :force => true do |t|
  t.string   "associable_type"
  t.integer  "associable_id"
  t.integer  "site_id"
  t.boolean  "primary_eligible"
  t.boolean  "secondary_eligible"
  t.boolean  "originating_site"
  t.datetime "created_at"
  t.datetime "updated_at"
end

class ContentAssociation < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :site
  belongs_to :associable, :polymorphic => true
  belongs_to :primary_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id" 
  belongs_to :secondary_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
  belongs_to :originating_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
end

class Site < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :content_associations, :dependent => :destroy 
  has_many :articles, :through => :content_associations, :source => :associable, :source_type => "Article"
  has_many :events, :through => :content_associations, :source => :associable, :source_type => "Event"

  has_many :primary_articles, :through => :content_associations, 
                              :source => :associable, 
                              :source_type => "Article", 
                              :conditions => ["content_associations.primary_eligible = ?" true]

  has_many :originating_articles, :through => :content_associations, 
                                  :source => :associable, 
                                  :source_type => "Article", 
                                  :conditions => ["content_associations.originating_site = ?" true]

  has_many :secondary_articles, :through => :content_associations, 
                                :source => :associable, 
                                :source_type => "Article", 
                                :conditions => ["content_associations.secondary_eligible = ?" true]
end

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :content_associations, :as => :associable, :dependent => :destroy
  has_one :originating_site, :through => :content_associations, 
                             :source => :associable, 
                             :conditions => ["content_associations.originating_site = ?" true]

  has_many :primary_sites, :through => :content_associations, 
                           :source => :associable
                           :conditions => ["content_associations.primary_eligible = ?" true]

  has_many :secondary_sites, :through => :content_associations, 
                             :source => :associable
                             :conditions => ["content_associations.secondary_eligible = ?" true]                         
end

I've tried a lot of variations of the above association declarations, but no matter what I do, I can't seem to get the behavior I want

@site = Site.find(2)
@article = Article.find(23)
@article.originating_site = @site
@site.originating_articles #=>[@article]

or this

@site.primary_articles << @article
@article.primary_sites #=> [@site]

Is Rails' built-in polymorphism the wrong mechanism to use to affect these connections between Sites and their various pieces of content? It seems like it would be useful because of the fact that I need to connect multiple different models to a single common model in a many-to-many way, but I've had a hard time finding any examples using it in this manner.

Perhaps part of the complexity is that I need the association in both directions -- i.e. to see all the Sites that a given Article is associated with and see all of the Articles associated with a given Site. I've heard of the plugin has_many_polymorphs, and it looks like it might solve my problems. But I'm trying to use Rails 3 here and not sure that it's supported yet.

Any help is greatly appreciated -- even if it just sheds more light on my imperfect understanding of the uses of polymorphism in this context.

thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
primary_articles, secondary_articles and originating_articles should be scopes instead of associations. –  Adam Lassek Aug 17 '10 at 23:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you need the associations to be more extensible than STI would allow, you can try writing your own collection helpers that do extra type-introspection.

Any time you define a relationship with belongs_to, has_many or has_one etc. you can also define helper functions related to that collection:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :associations, :as => :associable, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :sites, :through => :article_associations

  scope :originating_site, lambda { joins(:article_associations).where('content_associations.originating_site' => true).first }
  scope :primary_sites, lambda { joins(:article_associations).where('content_associations.primary_eligable' => true) }
  scope :secondary_sites, lambda { joins(:article_associations).where('content_associations.secondary_eligable' => true) }
end

class Site < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :content_associations, :as => :associable, :dependent => :destroy do
    def articles
      collect(&:associable).collect { |a| a.is_a? Article }
    end
  end
end

class ContentAssociation < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :site
  belongs_to :associable, :polymorphic => true
  belongs_to :primary_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
  belongs_to :secondary_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
  belongs_to :originating_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
end

You could move those function defs elsewhere if you need them to be more DRY:

module Content
  class Procs
    cattr_accessor :associations
    @@associations = lambda do
      def articles
        collect(&:associable).collect { |a| a.is_a? Article }
      end

      def events
        collect(&:associable).collect { |e| e.is_a? Event }
      end

      def bios
        collect(&:associable).collect { |b| b.is_a? Bio }
      end
    end
  end
end


class Site < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :content_associations, :as => :associable, :dependent => :destroy, &Content::Procs.associations
end

And since articles, events & bios in this example are all doing the same thing, we can DRY this even more:

module Content
  class Procs
    cattr_accessor :associations
    @@associations = lambda do
      %w(articles events bios).each do |type_name|
        type = eval type_name.singularize.classify
        define_method type_name do
          collect(&:associable).collect { |a| a.is_a? type }
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

And now it's starting to become more like a generic plugin, rather than application-specific code. Which is good, because you can reuse it easily.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great stuff -- thanks! I'm certainly learning more about ActiveRecord from this thread. I've marked this as the right answer since it comes full circle back to polymorphism. :-) –  trevrosen Aug 24 '10 at 13:34
    
@trevrosen I guess the crux of my point boils down to: if you don't have access to a plugin to do this for you, write your own :) It's not that scary. –  Adam Lassek Aug 24 '10 at 18:07
    
Good point. One minor technical edit here in case others come looking to use some of this code: the scopes above in Article need to be wrapped in a lambda to work properly. :-) –  trevrosen Aug 25 '10 at 16:04

Just a shot, but have you looked at polymorphic has_many :through => relationships? There's a few useful blog posts about - try http://blog.hasmanythrough.com/2006/4/3/polymorphic-through and http://www.inter-sections.net/2007/09/25/polymorphic-has_many-through-join-model/ (there was also a question here). Hope some of that helps a bit, good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I've looked into the has_many :through polymorphics, but my problem is more about getting the association to let me put those extra boolean attributes on it than it is anything else -- that's where the hangup comes in; I'm making a "fat" join model. –  trevrosen Aug 17 '10 at 19:45
    
Hmmm, yes - @Adam's suggest of creating scopes sounds promising... –  Sonia Aug 18 '10 at 14:22
    
The primary/secondary thing is actually a per-Site issue, so it's something that goes on the join model. That's where the problem seems to be -- having a "fat" join model that's also polymorphic. –  trevrosen Aug 18 '10 at 17:56

In this case I don't think polymorphism is the right way to go, at least from what I understand of your system's design. Here's an example using STI. It's complicated, so forgive me if I'm missing something. I'm also not very strong on the new arel syntax, so can't guarantee this will function without tinkering.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :article_associations, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :sites, :through => :article_associations

  scope :originating_site, lambda { joins(:article_associations).where('content_associations.originating_site' => true).first }
  scope :primary_sites, lambda { joins(:article_associations).where('content_associations.primary_eligable' => true) }
  scope :secondary_sites, lambda { joins(:article_associations).where('content_associations.secondary_eligable' => true) }
end

class Site < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :content_associations, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :article_associations
  has_many :articles, :through => :article_associations
end

class ContentAssociation < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :site
  belongs_to :primary_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
  belongs_to :secondary_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
  belongs_to :originating_site, :class_name => "Site", :foreign_key => "site_id"
end

class ArticleAssociation < ContentAssociation
  belongs_to :article
end

What I'm doing here is creating a base association model and a separate child association for each data type. So, if you need to access associations by type you'll have access to site.articles but you can also get a list of site.content_assocations with everything together.

The STI feature will need a type:string column to store the datatype. This will be handled automatically unless you're using the ContentAssociation model. Since ArticleAssociation is using article_id you'll also need to add that, and every other column the child models use.

share|improve this answer
    
This approach looks really useful -- thanks for passing it along. I see what you mean about using scopes through joins, and I'm kicking myself for not having thought of that already. I had been hoping to be able to use an included module or an "acts_as" to create the associations for any new content type that needed them to keep things DRY. Can that be done in the context of STI given that it relies on inheritance and not a mixin? –  trevrosen Aug 20 '10 at 14:21
    
@trevrosen The way I'm doing the associations, you'll have to add a new column for each datatype. So if extensibility is very important, this probably won't work well. But I think the polymorphism will make dealing with the assocations difficult, so you might have to roll your own helpers to do type-checking. –  Adam Lassek Aug 20 '10 at 17:00
    
It's still up in the air for me as to whether I'm going to go with STI or if I'm going to continue with a strategy of a SiteConnectable module relying on multiple join models w/ a similar structure. For right now, the extensibility seems to be pushing me toward the latter, but the approach should make it easy for me to convert to STI later if it makes sense to. Either way, yours was an enlightening answer... :-) –  trevrosen Aug 23 '10 at 17:46

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