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Is there a read/write locking mechanism that works across processes (similar to Mutex, but read/write instead exclusive locking)? I would like to allow concurrent read access, but exclusive write access.

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Cross process or cross thread? –  Albin Sunnanbo Aug 17 '10 at 15:04
    
@Albin - cross process. –  Jeremy Aug 17 '10 at 15:15
    
Did you find any solution? –  Bipul Mar 3 '11 at 10:23
1  
@Bipul - no but one post suggested rolling my own solution using System.Threading.Mutex, because there isn't a cross thread reader-writer lock built into the OS. –  Jeremy Mar 4 '11 at 19:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. As Richard noted above, there is no such out of the box mechanism in .NET. This is how to implement it using a mutex and a semaphore.

Method #1 is described in http://www.joecheng.com/blog/entries/Writinganinter-processRea.html, quoting:

// create or open global mutex
GlobalMutex mutex = new GlobalMutex("IdOfProtectedResource.Mutex");
// create or open global semaphore
int MoreThanMaxNumberOfReadersEver = 100;

GlobalSemaphore semaphore = new GlobalSemaphore("IdOfProtectedResource.Semaphore", MoreThanMaxNumberOfReadersEver);

public void AcquireReadLock()
{
  mutex.Acquire();
  semaphore.Acquire();
  mutex.Release();
}

public void ReleaseReadLock()
{
  semaphore.Release();
}

public void AcquireWriteLock()
{
  mutex.Acquire();
  for (int i = 0; i < MoreThanMaxNumberOfReadersEver; i++)
    semaphore.Acquire(); // drain out all readers-in-progress
  mutex.Release();
}

public void ReleaseWriteLock()
{
  for (int i = 0; i < MoreThanMaxNumberOfReadersEver; i++)
    semaphore.Release();
}

An alternative would be:

Read locking - as above. Write locking as follows (pseudocode):

- Lock mutex
- Busy loop until the samaphore is not taken AT ALL:
-- wait, release.
-- Release returns value; 
-- if value N-1 then break loop.
-- yield (give up CPU cycle) by using Sleep(1) or alternative
- Do write
- Release mutex

It must be noted that more efficient approach is possible, as here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readers-writers_problem#The_second_readers-writers_problem Look for the words "This solution is suboptimal" in the article above.

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Windows does not include a cross process Reader-Writer lock. A combination of Semaphore and Mutex could be used to construct ones (the Mutex is held by a writer for exclusive access or by a Reader which then uses the Semaphore to release other readers—i.e. writers would wait on just the mutex and readers for either).

However, if contention is expected to be low (i.e. no thread holds a lock for long) then mutual exclusion may still be faster: the additional complexity of the reader-writer lock overwhelms any benefit of allowing multiple readers in. (A reader-writer lock will only be faster if there are many more readers and locks are held for significant time—but only your profiling can confirm this.)

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+1 for performance note –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Feb 26 '13 at 15:46

System.Threading.Mutex has a mutex that can be used for intra-process communication. If you would like functionality that it doesn't support, it can be implemented via a mutex.

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1  
Do you know of any samples that implement a read/write mutex? –  Jeremy Aug 17 '10 at 15:14
    
This guy says it is actually not possible: stackoverflow.com/questions/1008726/… –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Feb 26 '13 at 15:47
    
@PavelRadzivilovsky That question says it can't be done without using at least one kernel level object, like a mutex. –  McKay Feb 27 '13 at 4:06
    
right - and it cannot be implemented "via a mutex", either. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Feb 27 '13 at 8:58
    
@PavelRadzivilovsky Actually, the answer specifically states "However what you can do is use a spin lock and fall back to a mutex whenever there is contention." –  McKay Feb 27 '13 at 14:59

Have you looked at System.Threading.ReaderWriteLock? Here's the MSDN Link.

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1  
That's not cross-process –  Zippit Aug 17 '10 at 15:09
    
Ah. Misuderstood the question (still on first cup of coffee). I'll leave this up for a few minutes and then delete it. –  AllenG Aug 17 '10 at 15:24

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