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I have read on css tricks that :not should not add additional specificity. But it looks like it does?

https://css-tricks.com/almanac/selectors/n/not/

The specificity of the :not pseudo class is the specificity of its argument. The :not() pseudo class does not add to the selector specificity, unlike other pseudo-classes.

Or am I missing something?

.red:not(.blue) {
  background: blue;
}

.red {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  background: red;
}
<div class="red">
</div>

share|improve this question
2  
Compare it to .blue.red instead, the .red still counts – Juan Mendes Jan 27 at 13:32
up vote 32 down vote accepted

Yes, it adds the specificity of its argument. Look at the first sentence:

The specificity of the :not pseudo class is the specificity of its argument. The :not() pseudo class does not add to the selector specificity, unlike other pseudo-classes.

So the specificity of .red:not(.blue) is equal to that of .red.blue — 2 class selectors, or (0, 2, 0), making it more specific than .red on its own. What the second sentence means is that the :not() itself does not contribute the additional specificity of a pseudo-class to make it (0, 3, 0), like the :hover in .red.blue:hover does for example.

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4  
@guest271314: Because the first rule is more specific. This is a question about specificity, after all. – BoltClock Jan 27 at 13:35
3  
@guest271314: I don't think it's really necessary to include a tutorial on calculating specificity in every answer on the topic. There are a number of resources online that will explain it better than I can in any individual answer – BoltClock Jan 27 at 13:41
1  
@Ilmari Karonen: You don't even have to do that always - you can also simply repeat whichever simple selector is already in use, e.g. .red.red or #id#id (though it appears the latter is bugged in IE). :not() does come in handy with type selectors, though - see stackoverflow.com/questions/28299817/… – BoltClock Jan 27 at 17:12
1  
@BoltClock: That requires the selector to already have a class or ID in it. Actually, my original use case for this trick was making a style like a[rel=nofollow] { color: green } (specificity 0,1,1; injected by a user script) take precedence over, say, a#someid { color: black } (specificity 1,0,1; already present in site style sheet). Using a[rel=nofollow]:not(#nosuchid) (specificity 1,1,1) does the trick. (Of course, !important would've worked too... except that it turned out some of the existing styles I wanted to override were already using !important.) – Ilmari Karonen Jan 27 at 17:27
1  
@Ilmari Karonen: Oddly enough, a question just popped up with your exact use case - stackoverflow.com/questions/35062256/… Want to answer it, or may I in your place? – BoltClock Jan 28 at 13:41

The :not selector don't have it's own specificity, however the selector inside :not() do have.

From MDN

Selector Types

The following list of selector types is by increasing specificity:

  1. Type selectors (e.g., h1) and pseudo-elements (e.g., :before).
  2. Class selectors (e.g., .example), attributes selectors (e.g., [type="radio"]) and pseudo-classes (e.g., :hover).
  3. ID selectors (e.g., #example).

Universal selector (*), combinators (+, >, ~, ' ') and negation pseudo-class (:not()) have no effect on specificity. (The selectors declared inside :not() do, however.)


As you're having the rule .red:not(.blue) and the element <div class="red"> don't have the class blue, the rule is applied.

.red:not(.blue) {
  background: blue;
}

.red {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  background: red;
}
div {
  background: green;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  margin: 10px;
}
<div></div>
<div class="red"></div>
<div class="blue"></div>

share|improve this answer
    
Oh I'm dumb. I guess I totally misread what they were saying. Thank you. – Paran0a Jan 27 at 13:25
4  
1) You need to use blockquote markup, see stackoverflow.com/help/referencing 2) This doesn't really address the :not(). If anything, it reinforces the OP's confusion by restating that "the negation pseudo-class [has] no effect on specificity". – BoltClock Jan 27 at 13:32
    
Thanks @BoltClock. #1 -> Done. #2 -> Just kept the doc links, so I think the confusion is removed. – Tushar Jan 27 at 13:35

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