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I'm experimenting with this code-first approach, but I'm find out now that a property of type System.Decimal gets mapped to a sql column of type decimal(18, 0).

How do I set the precision of the database column?

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10 Answers

up vote 59 down vote accepted

The answer from Dave Van den Eynde is now out of date. There are 2 important changes, from EF 4.1 onwards the ModelBuilder class is now DbModelBuilder and there is now a DecimalPropertyConfiguration.HasPrecision Method which has a signature of:

public DecimalPropertyConfiguration HasPrecision(
byte precision,
byte scale )

where precision is the total number of digits the db will store, regardless of where the decimal point falls and scale is the number of decimal places it will store.

Therefore there is no need to iterate through properties as shown but the can just be called from

public class EFDbContext : DbContext
{
   protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
   {
       modelBuilder.Entity<Class>().Property(object => object.property).HasPrecision(12, 10);

       base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
   }
}
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For anyone that is getting issues with the DbModelBuilder, try System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder –  ThePower Nov 15 '11 at 12:11
1  
I noticed you never called base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);. Was that intentional or just a victim of typing code online instead of in an IDE? –  BenSwayne Aug 1 '12 at 23:31
1  
@BenSwayne thanks for the spot, this is my omission, not anything intentional. I will edit the answer. –  AlexC Aug 2 '12 at 7:56
3  
The 2 arguments to HasPrecision(precision, scale) are poorly documented. precision is the total number of digits it will store, regardless of where the decimal point falls. scale is the number of decimal places it will store. –  Chris Moschini Aug 18 '12 at 21:29
    
You saved my day....it worked like a charm –  Atul Sureka Feb 7 at 10:49
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Apparently, you can override the DbContext.OnModelCreating() method and configure the precision like this:

protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price).Precision = 10;
    modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price).Scale = 2;
}

But this is pretty tedious code when you have to do it with all your price-related properties, so I came up with this:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        var properties = new[]
        {
            modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price),
            modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().Property(order => order.OrderTotal),
            modelBuilder.Entity<OrderDetail>().Property(detail => detail.Total),
            modelBuilder.Entity<Option>().Property(option => option.Price)
        };

        properties.ToList().ForEach(property =>
        {
            property.Precision = 10;
            property.Scale = 2;
        });

        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    }

It's good practice that you call the base method when you override a method, even though the base implementation does nothing.

Update: This article was also very helpful.

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7  
Thanks, this pointed me in the right direction. In CTP5 the syntax has changed to allow adding Precision and Scale in the same statement : modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price).HasPrecision(6, 2); –  Col Jan 12 '11 at 8:56
1  
Still, wouldn't it be nice to have some sort of "default" you could set for all decimals? –  Dave Van den Eynde Jun 10 '11 at 6:55
2  
I don't think calling base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder); is necessary. From the DbContext metadata in VS: The default implementation of this method does nothing, but it can be overridden in a derived class such that the model can be further configured before it is locked down. –  Matt Jenkins Jul 24 '11 at 8:05
    
@Matt: That's nice, but as an implementor I shouldn't care about this and always call the base. –  Dave Van den Eynde Jul 25 '11 at 6:53
    
@ Dave and @Matt: There was a comment it was "IMPORTANT" to call base. It is good practice, but when the EF source has an empty implementation , it is misleading to claim it is Important. That leaves people wondering what the base does. I was so curious what was IMPORTANT i decompiled to the ef5.0 to check. Nothing there. So just a good habit. –  phil soady Mar 1 '13 at 3:57
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I had a nice time creating an Custom Attribute for this:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, Inherited = false, AllowMultiple = false)]
public sealed class DecimalPrecisionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public DecimalPrecisionAttribute(byte precision, byte scale)
    {
        Precision = precision;
        Scale = scale;

    }

    public byte Precision { get; set; }
    public byte Scale { get; set; }

}

using it like this

[DecimalPrecision(20,10)]
public Nullable<decimal> DeliveryPrice { get; set; }

and the magic happens at model creation with some reflection

protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    foreach (Type classType in from t in Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(DecimalPrecisionAttribute)).GetTypes()
                                   where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == "YOURMODELNAMESPACE"
                                   select t)
     {
         foreach (var propAttr in classType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance).Where(p => p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>() != null).Select(
                p => new { prop = p, attr = p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>(true) }))
         {

             var entityConfig = modelBuilder.GetType().GetMethod("Entity").MakeGenericMethod(classType).Invoke(modelBuilder, null);
             ParameterExpression param = ParameterExpression.Parameter(classType, "c");
             Expression property = Expression.Property(param, propAttr.prop.Name);
             LambdaExpression lambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda(property, true,
                                                                      new ParameterExpression[]
                                                                          {param});
             DecimalPropertyConfiguration decimalConfig;
             if (propAttr.prop.PropertyType.IsGenericType && propAttr.prop.PropertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
             {
                 MethodInfo methodInfo = entityConfig.GetType().GetMethods().Where(p => p.Name == "Property").ToList()[7];
                 decimalConfig = methodInfo.Invoke(entityConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;
             }
             else
             {
                 MethodInfo methodInfo = entityConfig.GetType().GetMethods().Where(p => p.Name == "Property").ToList()[6];
                 decimalConfig = methodInfo.Invoke(entityConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;
             }

             decimalConfig.HasPrecision(propAttr.attr.Precision, propAttr.attr.Scale);
        }
    }
}

the first part is to get all classes in the model (my custom attribute is defined in that assembly so i used that to get the assembly with the model)

the second foreach gets all properties in that class with the custom attribute, and the attribute itself so i can get the precision and scale data

after that i have to call

modelBuilder.Entity<MODEL_CLASS>().Property(c=> c.PROPERTY_NAME).HasPrecision(PRECITION,SCALE);

so i call the modelBuilder.Entity() by reflection and store it in the entityConfig variable then i build the "c => c.PROPERTY_NAME" lambda expression

After that, if the decimal is nullable i call the

Property(Expression<Func<TStructuralType, decimal?>> propertyExpression) 

method (i call this by the position in the array, it's not ideal i know, any help will be much appreciated)

and if it's not nullable i call the

Property(Expression<Func<TStructuralType, decimal>> propertyExpression)

method.

Having the DecimalPropertyConfiguration i call the HasPrecision method.

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Little typo : Precision not Precition. –  Patrick J Collins Mar 13 '13 at 17:22
    
thanks patrick, fixed it –  KinSlayerUY Mar 13 '13 at 19:14
1  
worked like a charm! –  Bart Mar 13 '13 at 19:18
1  
Thanks for this. It saved me from generating thousands of lambda expressions. –  Sean Jul 5 '13 at 13:58
1  
This works great, and is super clean! For EF 5, I changed System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder to System.Data.Entity.DbModelBuilder –  Colin Aug 31 '13 at 3:07
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this code line could be a simpler way to acomplish the same:

 public class ProductConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Product>
    {
        public ProductConfiguration()
        {
            this.Property(m => m.Price).HasPrecision(10, 2);
        }
    }
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Entity Framework Ver 6 (Alpha, rc1) has something called Custom Conventions. To set decimal precision:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Properties<decimal>().Configure(config => config.HasPrecision(18, 4));
}

Reference:

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Similar to mxasim's answer, if you want to set the precision for all decimals in EF6 you could also do the following:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<DecimalPropertyConvention>();
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DecimalPropertyConvention(38, 18));
}

The default DecimalPropertyConvention in EF6 maps decimal properties to decimal(18,2) columns.

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You can found more information on MSDN - facet of Entity Data Model. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee382834.aspx Full recommended.

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That's great and all, but how does that relate to Code-First? –  Dave Van den Eynde Jun 10 '11 at 6:57
    
It is useful but I can't specify a [Precision] attribute for a Decimal, still. So I used the solution provided by @KinSlayerUY. –  Colin Aug 31 '13 at 3:15
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In EF6

modelBuilder.Properties()
    .Where(x => x.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>().Any())
    .Configure(c => {
        var attr = (DecimalPrecisionAttribute)c.ClrPropertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (DecimalPrecisionAttribute), true).FirstOrDefault();

        c.HasPrecision(attr.Precision, attr.Scale);
    });
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Following on from KinSlayerUY and user3332875, in EF6 you can create a convention which will handle the DecimalPrecisonAttribute.

public class DecimalPrecisionAttributeConvention
    : PrimitivePropertyAttributeConfigurationConvention<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>
{
    public override void Apply(ConventionPrimitivePropertyConfiguration configuration, DecimalPrecisionAttribute attribute)
    {
        if (attribute.Precision < 1 || attribute.Precision > 38)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Precision must be between 1 and 38.");
        }

        if (attribute.Scale < 0 || attribute.Scale > attribute.Precision)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Scale must be between 0 and the Precision value.");
        }

        configuration.HasPrecision(attribute.Precision, attribute.Scale);
    }
}

Then in your DbContext:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{        
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DecimalPrecisionAttributeConvention());
}    
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There's already one of these in EF6; see kjbartel's answer. –  Michael Edenfield 2 days ago
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Zotak is new to Entity Framework but prefers to use the designer for changes to scale and precision of decimal fields. Zotak thinks this approach is safer.

Scale and precision are both in the properties Window on the Entity Designer.

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45  
Zotak didn't answer the question. –  Dave Van den Eynde Dec 16 '10 at 15:29
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