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Say I convert some seconds into the TimeSpan object like this:

Dim sec = 1254234568
Dim t As TimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(sec)

How do I format the TimeSpan object into a format like the following:

>105hr 56mn 47sec

Is there a built-in function or do I need to write a custom function?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Well, the simplest thing to do is to format this yourself, e.g.

return string.Format("{0}hr {1}mn {2}sec",
                     (int) span.TotalHours,
                     span.Minutes,
                     span.Seconds);

In VB:

Public Shared Function FormatTimeSpan(span As TimeSpan) As String
    Return String.Format("{0}hr {1}mn {2}sec", _
                         CInt(Math.Truncate(span.TotalHours)), _
                         span.Minutes, _
                         span.Seconds)
End Function

I don't know whether any of the TimeSpan formatting in .NET 4 would make this simpler.

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You may want to give VB code, though, as the code in the question looks like it :-) –  Joey Aug 17 '10 at 17:37
1  
Am I missing something? I get nervous when my answer disagrees with Jon Skeet :-) –  Jason Williams Aug 17 '10 at 17:38
2  
((int) span.TotalMinutes) % 60 can be replaced by span.Minutes. The same thing with seconds. –  Lasse Espeholt Aug 17 '10 at 17:43
1  
Jason, your nervousness is well-justified. –  John Aug 17 '10 at 17:43
    
Oops, yes, got carried away after the TotalHours - which is required. –  Jon Skeet Aug 17 '10 at 17:48
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string.Format("{0}hr {1}mn {2}sec", (int) t.TotalHours, t.Minutes, t.Seconds);

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1  
This is only for TimeSpan < 24 hr. And t,Seconds should be t.Seconds –  Angkor Wat Aug 17 '10 at 17:39
2  
You should change that to {0:f0} ..., t.TotalHours, ... –  SLaks Aug 17 '10 at 17:39
    
@Angkor: Good point. Tweaked to cope with >24 hours –  Jason Williams Aug 17 '10 at 18:15
    
Still, you need to tweak (int) t.TotalHours, see my comment on Jon Skeet post about rounding. –  Angkor Wat Aug 17 '10 at 18:41
    
@Angkor Wat: ??? We don't want rounding, we want truncation. –  Jason Williams Aug 17 '10 at 19:49
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Microsoft doesn't (currently) have a simple format string shortcut for this. The easiest options have already been shared.

string.Format("{0}hr {1:mm}mn {1:ss}sec", (int)t.TotalHours, t);

However, an overly-thorough option is to implement your own ICustomFormatter for TimeSpan. I wouldn't recommend it unless you use this so often that it would save you time in the long run. However, there are times where you DO write a class where writing your own ICustomFormatter is appropriate, so I wrote this one as an example.

/// <summary>
/// Custom string formatter for TimeSpan that allows easy retrieval of Total segments.
/// </summary>
/// <example>
/// TimeSpan myTimeSpan = new TimeSpan(27, 13, 5);
/// string.Format("{0:th,###}h {0:mm}m {0:ss}s", myTimeSpan) -> "27h 13m 05s"
/// string.Format("{0:TH}", myTimeSpan) -> "27.2180555555556"
/// 
/// NOTE: myTimeSpan.ToString("TH") does not work.  See Remarks.
/// </example>
/// <remarks>
/// Due to a quirk of .NET Framework (up through version 4.5.1), 
/// <code>TimeSpan.ToString(format, new TimeSpanFormatter())</code> will not work; it will always call 
/// TimeSpanFormat.FormatCustomized() which takes a DateTimeFormatInfo rather than an 
/// IFormatProvider/ICustomFormatter.  DateTimeFormatInfo, unfortunately, is a sealed class.
/// </remarks>
public class TimeSpanFormatter : IFormatProvider, ICustomFormatter
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Used to create a wrapper format string with the specified format.
    /// </summary>
    private const string DefaultFormat = "{{0:{0}}}";

    /// <remarks>
    /// IFormatProvider.GetFormat implementation. 
    /// </remarks>
    public object GetFormat(Type formatType)
    {
        // Determine whether custom formatting object is requested. 
        if (formatType == typeof(ICustomFormatter))
        {
            return this;
        }

        return null;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the specified format is looking for a total, and formats it accordingly.
    /// If not, returns the default format for the given <para>format</para> of a TimeSpan.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// The formatted string for the given TimeSpan.
    /// </returns>
    /// <remarks>
    /// ICustomFormatter.Format implementation.
    /// </remarks>
    public string Format(string format, object arg, IFormatProvider formatProvider)
    {
        // only apply our format if there is a format and if the argument is a TimeSpan
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(format) ||
            formatProvider != this || // this should always be true, but just in case...
            !(arg is TimeSpan) ||
            arg == null)
        {
            // return the default for whatever our format and argument are
            return GetDefault(format, arg);
        }

        TimeSpan span = (TimeSpan)arg;

        string[] formatSegments = format.Split(new char[] { ',' }, 2);
        string tsFormat = formatSegments[0];

        // Get inner formatting which will be applied to the int or double value of the requested total.
        // Default number format is just to return the number plainly.
        string numberFormat = "{0}";
        if (formatSegments.Length > 1)
        {
            numberFormat = string.Format(DefaultFormat, formatSegments[1]);
        }

        // We only handle two-character formats, and only when those characters' capitalization match
        // (e.g. 'TH' and 'th', but not 'tH').  Feel free to change this to suit your needs.
        if (tsFormat.Length != 2 ||
            char.IsUpper(tsFormat[0]) != char.IsUpper(tsFormat[1]))
        {
            return GetDefault(format, arg);
        }

        // get the specified time segment from the TimeSpan as a double
        double valAsDouble;
        switch (char.ToLower(tsFormat[1]))
        {
            case 'd':
                valAsDouble = span.TotalDays;
                break;
            case 'h':
                valAsDouble = span.TotalHours;
                break;
            case 'm':
                valAsDouble = span.TotalMinutes;
                break;
            case 's':
                valAsDouble = span.TotalSeconds;
                break;
            case 'f':
                valAsDouble = span.TotalMilliseconds;
                break;
            default:
                return GetDefault(format, arg);
        }

        // figure out if we want a double or an integer
        switch (tsFormat[0])
        {
            case 'T':
                // format Total as double
                return string.Format(numberFormat, valAsDouble);

            case 't':
                // format Total as int (rounded down)
                return string.Format(numberFormat, (int)valAsDouble);

            default:
                return GetDefault(format, arg);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the formatted value when we don't know what to do with their specified format.
    /// </summary>
    private string GetDefault(string format, object arg)
    {
        return string.Format(string.Format(DefaultFormat, format), arg);
    }
}

Note, as in the remarks in the code, TimeSpan.ToString(format, myTimeSpanFormatter) will not work due to a quirk of the .NET Framework, so you'll always have to use string.Format(format, myTimeSpanFormatter) to use this class. See How to create and use a custom IFormatProvider for DateTime?.


EDIT: If you really, and I mean really, want this to work with TimeSpan.ToString(string, TimeSpanFormatter), you can add the following to the above TimeSpanFormatter class:

/// <remarks>
/// Update this as needed.
/// </remarks>
internal static string[] GetRecognizedFormats()
{
    return new string[] { "td", "th", "tm", "ts", "tf", "TD", "TH", "TM", "TS", "TF" };
}

And add the following class somewhere in the same namespace:

public static class TimeSpanFormatterExtensions
{
    private static readonly string CustomFormatsRegex = string.Format(@"([^\\])?({0})(?:,{{([^(\\}})]+)}})?", string.Join("|", TimeSpanFormatter.GetRecognizedFormats()));

    public static string ToString(this TimeSpan timeSpan, string format, ICustomFormatter formatter)
    {
        if (formatter == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        }

        TimeSpanFormatter tsFormatter = (TimeSpanFormatter)formatter;

        format = Regex.Replace(format, CustomFormatsRegex, new MatchEvaluator(m => MatchReplacer(m, timeSpan, tsFormatter)));
        return timeSpan.ToString(format);
    }

    private static string MatchReplacer(Match m, TimeSpan timeSpan, TimeSpanFormatter formatter)
    {
        // the matched non-'\' char before the stuff we actually care about
        string firstChar = m.Groups[1].Success ? m.Groups[1].Value : string.Empty;

        string input;
        if (m.Groups[3].Success)
        {
            // has additional formatting
            input = string.Format("{0},{1}", m.Groups[2].Value, m.Groups[3].Value);
        }
        else
        {
            input = m.Groups[2].Value;
        }

        string replacement = formatter.Format(input, timeSpan, formatter);
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(replacement))
        {
            return firstChar;
        }

        return string.Format("{0}\\{1}", firstChar, string.Join("\\", replacement.ToCharArray()));
    }
}

After this, you may use

ICustomFormatter formatter = new TimeSpanFormatter();
string myStr = myTimeSpan.ToString(@"TH,{000.00}h\:tm\m\:ss\s", formatter);

where {000.00} is however you want the TotalHours int or double to be formatted. Note the enclosing braces, which should not be there in the string.Format() case. Also note, formatter must be declared (or cast) as ICustomFormatter rather than TimeSpanFormatter.

Excessive? Yes. Awesome? Uhhh....

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Beautiful over engineering. I doff my cap. –  BanksySan Jul 15 at 22:47
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You may need to calculate the hours. The range for hours in TimeSpan.ToString is only 0-23.

The worst you'll need is to do raw string formatting a la Jon Skeet.

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Try this Function:

Public Shared Function GetTimeSpanString(ByVal ts As TimeSpan) As String
        Dim output As New StringBuilder()

        Dim needsComma As Boolean = False

        If ts = Nothing Then

            Return "00:00:00"

        End If

        If ts.TotalHours >= 1 Then
            output.AppendFormat("{0} hr", Math.Truncate(ts.TotalHours))
            If ts.TotalHours > 1 Then
                output.Append("s")
            End If
            needsComma = True
        End If

        If ts.Minutes > 0 Then
            If needsComma Then
                output.Append(", ")
            End If
            output.AppendFormat("{0} m", ts.Minutes)
            'If ts.Minutes > 1 Then
            '    output.Append("s")
            'End If
            needsComma = True
        End If

        Return output.ToString()

 End Function       

Convert A Timespan To Hours And Minutes

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