Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following SQL statement works in MySQL but not with Oracle:

SELECT *, MAX(COLUMN_A) 
  FROM table_xyz 
 WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 
GROUP BY COLUMN_A

Oracle complaint: "FROM keyword not found where expected"


actually the statement was incorrect, we were not grouping by COLUMN_A but another column instead. actually what we want is this

SELECT *, MAX(COLUMN_A) 
  FROM table_xyz 
 WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 
GROUP BY COLUMN_B

this works but gives us only column A and B

SELECT COLUMN_B, MAX(COLUMN_A) 
  FROM table_xyz 
 WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 
GROUP BY COLUMN_B

what we want is this, but it doesn't work (group by error)

SELECT COLUMN_B, COLUMN_C .... COLUMN_X, MAX(COLUMN_A) 
  FROM table_xyz 
 WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 
GROUP BY COLUMN_B
share|improve this question
1  
Correct. You'll have to adjust the query. –  MikeG Aug 17 '10 at 20:00
1  
Could you describe what you are actually trying to achieve. This statement does not really make sense at all –  a_horse_with_no_name Aug 17 '10 at 21:09

5 Answers 5

That's because Oracle requires you to define all the columns not wrapped in an aggregate function (MIN, MAX, COUNT, etc). SQL Server would return a similar error. MySQL's behavior is documented here.

Because your query is using SELECT *, I can't re-write it properly for you. But I also can't guarantee a syntactically correct version would return the same results as you see on MySQL either. Grouping by the same column you want the MAX is quite odd...

share|improve this answer
    
Actually all DBMS except MySQL will refuse to run such a query. MySQL simply returns indeterminate results –  a_horse_with_no_name Aug 17 '10 at 20:11
    
actually the statement was incorrect, we were not grouping by COLUMN_A but another column instead. actually what we want is this <code> SELECT *, MAX(COLUMN_A) FROM table_xyz WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 GROUP BY COLUMN_B this works but gives us only column A and B SELECT COLUMN_B, MAX(COLUMN_A) FROM table_xyz WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 GROUP BY COLUMN_B what we want is this, but it doesn't work (group by error) SELECT COLUMN_B, COLUMN_C .... COLUMN_X, MAX(COLUMN_A) FROM table_xyz WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 GROUP BY COLUMN_B </code> –  Dave Aug 17 '10 at 20:16
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: No, SQLite supports the same "hidden column" functionality that MySQL supports. But any real database, yes - you're correct. :) –  OMG Ponies Aug 17 '10 at 20:17
    
@Dave: Update your question with example data, output from DESC table_xyz, and expected output. –  OMG Ponies Aug 17 '10 at 20:22

If you want the max() for column_a you don't need the group by at all:

SELECT MAX(COLUMN_A) 
  FROM table_xyz 
 WHERE COLUMN_A <= 100 
share|improve this answer

In addition to what everyone else is saying, Oracle does not allow mixing * with explicit column definitions in queries:

SQL> select *, table_name from user_tables;
select *, table_name from user_tables
        *
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected

Oracle hasn't even looked at the fact that you are trying to get columns outside of those included in the group by clause. Which as others have stated, Oracle will not do.

share|improve this answer

This doesn't answer your MAX issue, but the only way to follow a '*' with other columns is if you use an explicit reference to a table alias - e.g.

 SELECT e.*, zip_code
 FROM  addresses a,
       employees e
 WHERE e.addressId = a.Id

For the MAX value, you will either need to group by all other columns, or look into analytic functions (plenty of previous answers on Stack Overflow).

share|improve this answer

Multiple problems. Your GROUP BY clause is backwards. You need to define your GROUP BY by the columns in the *. Also what OMG Ponies said before.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.