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How do I tweak this to get yesterday's date using localtime?

use strict;

sub spGetCurrentDateTime;
print spGetCurrentDateTime;

sub spGetCurrentDateTime {
my ($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year) = localtime();
my @abbr = qw( Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec );
my $currentDateTime = sprintf "%s %02d %4d", $abbr[$mon], $mday, $year+1900; #Returns => 'Aug 17 2010' 
return $currentDateTime;
}

~

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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The DST problem can be worked around by taking 3600s from midday today instead of the current time:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Time::Local;

sub spGetYesterdaysDate;
print spGetYesterdaysDate;

sub spGetYesterdaysDate {
my ($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year) = localtime();
my $yesterday_midday=timelocal(0,0,12,$mday,$mon,$year) - 24*60*60;
($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year) = localtime($yesterday_midday);
my @abbr = qw( Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec );
my $YesterdaysDate = sprintf "%s %02d %4d", $abbr[$mon], $mday, $year+1900;
return $YesterdaysDate;
}

In light of the "unspecified" documented behaviour of the strftime solution suggested by Chas, this approach might be better if you're not able to test for expected-but-not-guaranteed results across multiple platforms.

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thank you. this works well with my existing routine. –  jdamae Aug 18 '10 at 4:08
localtime(time() - 24*60*60)
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5  
There is an edge case around DST. I do not advise this method if you need this to work all of the time. –  Chas. Owens Aug 17 '10 at 22:14
3  
Downvote as per above. It's not a good answer. –  daxim Aug 17 '10 at 22:23
    
The DST edge case can be "worked around", see sample code in another answer. –  bigiain Aug 18 '10 at 3:23

use Time::Piece.

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

# These are core modules in Perl 5.10 and newer
use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $yesterday = localtime() - ONE_DAY;
say $yesterday->strftime('%b %d %Y');

Note that this can go wrong in certain borderline cases, such as the start of daylight saving time. The following version does behave correct in such cases:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

# These are core modules in Perl 5.10 and newer
use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $now = localtime();
my $yesterday = $now - ONE_HOUR*($now->hour + 12);
say $yesterday->strftime('%b %d %Y');

Alternatively, you can use the DateTime module as described in a different answer. That is not a core module, though.

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Same DST problem hides under the fancy API. –  daxim Aug 17 '10 at 22:23
    
Good point, daxim. I've added a version that doesn't have this problem. –  mscha Aug 18 '10 at 10:21
2  
Time::Piece and Time::Seconds didn't get added to the core until Perl 5.10 (well 5.9.5, but who uses dev releases?). –  Chas. Owens Aug 19 '10 at 14:05
use DateTime qw();
DateTime->now->subtract(days => 1); 

The expression on the second line returns a DateTime object.

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It does not work correctly for Asia/Kolkata timezone. –  user774250 Oct 13 '12 at 18:49
    
It does work, I just tested. Maybe you simply forgot to set the time_zone attribute in the constructor, or neglected to call the set_time_zone method? Maybe you have an outdated release of the DateTime::TimeZone distro? –  daxim Oct 16 '12 at 10:35

As tempting as it is to just subtract a day's worth of seconds from the current time, there are times when this will yield the wrong answer (leap seconds, DST, and possibly others). I find it easier to just let strftime (available in the Perl 5 core module POSIX) take care of all of that for me.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Local;
use POSIX qw/strftime/;

#2010-03-15 02:00:00
my ($s, $min, $h, $d, $m, $y) = (0, 0, 0, 15, 2, 110);

my $time      = timelocal $s, $min, $h, $d, $m, $y;    
my $today     = strftime "%Y-%m-%d %T", localtime $time;
my $yesterday = strftime "%Y-%m-%d %T", $s, $min, $h, $d - 1, $m, $y;
my $oops      = strftime "%Y-%m-%d %T", localtime $time - 24*60*60;
print "$today -> $yesterday -> $oops\n";
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So if the 'day' value is less than 1 strftime counts backwards day + 1 days into the previous month (and possibly year). Is this behaviour a documented part of POSIX or is it platform-specific? –  Grant McLean Aug 18 '10 at 1:39
1  
@Grant Mclean It may not be standard in POSIX (or SUS), but it is standard in Perl 5. The documentation says arguments are made consistent as though by calling "mktime()" before calling your system's "strftime()". –  Chas. Owens Aug 19 '10 at 11:42
    
As a one-liner: perl -MPOSIX -le '@t=localtime;--$t[3];print strftime "%Y%m%d",@t' –  theglauber Aug 22 '13 at 17:37
    
This is the only correct solution that i'm aware of now, which uses only standard (core) modules. –  theglauber Aug 22 '13 at 17:40

Solution suggested by most users is wrong!

localtime(time() - 24*60*60)

The worst thing you can do is to assume that 1 day = 86400 seconds.

Example: Timezone is America/New_York, date is Mon Apr 3 00:30:00 2006 timelocal gives us 1144038600 localtime(1144038600 - 86400) = Sat Apr 1 23:30:00 EST 2006 oops!

The right and the only solution is to let system function normalize values $prev_day = timelocal(0, 0, 0, $mday-1, $mon, $year); Or let datetime frameworks (DateTime, Class::Date, etc) do the same. that's it.

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This is how I do it.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use POSIX qw(strftime);

$epoc = time();
$epoc = $epoc - 24 * 60 * 60;

$datestring = strftime "%F", localtime($epoc);

print "Yesterday's date is $datestring \n";
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This can fail around the beginning of DST for reasons explained in other answers. –  Andrew Medico Jul 2 at 15:07

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