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Help needed guys! I'm writing a simple import application an need to read a csv file. Show result in a datagrid and show corrupted lines of csv file in another grid, for example show the lines that are shorter than 5 values in another grid. I'm trying to do that like this:

StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(FilePath);
importingData = new Account();
string line;
string[] row = new string [5];
while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
{
    row = line.Split(',');

        importingData.Add(new Transaction
        {
            Date = DateTime.Parse(row[0]),
            Reference = row[1],
            Description = row[2],
            Amount = decimal.Parse(row[3]),
            Category = (Category)Enum.Parse(typeof(Category), row[4])
        });
}

but its very difficult to operate on arrays in this case. Is there any better way to split the values. Any suggestions appreciated

Thanks guys. The information you provided was very useful. I found another way doing that using DataTable. Very interesting approach, here is the link : link text

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5 Answers 5

up vote 80 down vote accepted

Don't reinvent the wheel. Take advantage of what's already in .NET BCL.

  • add a reference to the Microsoft.VisualBasic (yes, it says VisualBasic but it works in C# just as well - remember that at the end it is all just IL)
  • use the Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser class to parse CSV file

Here is the sample code: (See also second example below)

TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(@"c:\temp\test.csv");
parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited;
parser.SetDelimiters(",");
while (!parser.EndOfData) 
{
    //Processing row
    string[] fields = parser.ReadFields();
    foreach (string field in fields) 
    {
        //TODO: Process field
    }
}
parser.Close();

It works great for me in my C# projects. Give it a try.

Edit: Here are some more links/informations


Because TextFieldParser implements IDisposable, it's best to use the using statement with it:

using (TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(@"c:\temp\test.csv"))
{
    parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited;
    parser.SetDelimiters(",");
    while (!parser.EndOfData) 
    {
        //Processing row
        string[] fields = parser.ReadFields();
        foreach (string field in fields) 
        {
            //TODO: Process field
        }
    }
}
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4  
I REALLY wish there was a way that didn't use VB libraries, but this worked perfectly! Thank you! –  rotard Feb 3 '12 at 14:05
1  
+1: I just broke the lumenworks Fast CSV reader on a 53Mb file. Looks like the line caching failed after 43,000 rows and scrambled the buffer. Tried the VB TextFieldParser and it did the trick. Thanks –  TrueBlueAussie May 21 '12 at 12:54
1  
+1 Great answer, as I find many people don't know this class exists. One thing for future viewers to note is that setting parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited; is not necessary if you call parser.SetDelimiters(",");, as the method sets the TextFieldType property for you. –  Brian Nov 5 '13 at 22:25
3  
Also check this out: dotnetperls.com/textfieldparser. TextFieldParser has worse performance than String.Split and StreamReader. However, there is a big difference between string.Split and TextFieldParser. TextFieldParser handles strange cases like having a comma in a column: you can name a column like "text with quote"", and comma", and you can get the correct value text with quote", and comma instead of wrongly separated values. So you may want to opt for String.Split if you csv is very simple. –  Yongwei Wu Dec 10 '13 at 3:53

My experience is that there are many different csv formats. Specially how they handle escaping of quotes and delimiters within a field.

These are the variants I have ran into:

  • quotes are quoted and doubled (excel) i.e. 15" -> field1,"15""",field3
  • quotes are not changed unless the field is quoted for some other reason. i.e. 15" -> field1,15",fields3
  • quotes are escaped with \. i.e. 15" -> field1,"15\"",field3
  • quotes are not changed at all (this is not always possible to parse correctly)
  • delimiter is quoted (excel). i.e. a,b -> field1,"a,b",field3
  • delimiter is escaped with \. i.e. a,b -> field1,a\,b,field3

I have tried many of the existing csv parsers but there is not a single one that can handle the variants I have ran into. It is also difficult to find out from the documentation which escaping variants the parsers support.

In my projects I now use either the VB TextFieldParser or a custom splitter.

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Love this answer for the test cases you provided! –  Matthew Rodatus Oct 4 '13 at 14:32

I use this here:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/GenericParser.aspx

Last time I was looking for something like this I found it as an answer to this question.

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CSV can get complicated real fast.

Use something robust and well-tested:
FileHelpers v2.0: http://filehelpers.sourceforge.net/

The FileHelpers are a free and easy to use .NET library to import/export data from fixed length or delimited records in files, strings or streams.

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1  
I think FileHelper is trying to do to much in one go. Parsing files is a 2 step process where you first split lines into fields and then parse the fields into data. Combining the functions makes it difficult to handle things like master-detail and line filtering. –  adrianm Aug 18 '10 at 10:11

How about regular expressions? You could use named groups to get your fields from each "row", as is done in this example: http://zamov.online.fr/EXHTML/CSharp/CSharp7.html

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