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So suppose I have a tree class like this in c++

class Node{
    void addChild(Node*);
    /*obvious stuff*/
    protected:
        Node* parent;
        vector<Node*> children
}

class specialNode : public Node{
    void addChild(specialNode*);
    /*obvious stuff*/
    /*special stuff*/
}

Now whenever I access the children in specialTree, I obviously get Node*, not specialNode*.

But this specialNode* has member variables and functions that Node doesn't have.

I can force specialNode to only have take specialNode as children and otherwise break in compile time, but I still get Node* when accessing children/parent, and I have to cast it whenever I want to use special functions, even in specialNode functions.

Is there any clever, or just any better way to go about this? Other than literally casting every time?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you only need SpecialNode objects in your tree (and just want to encapsulate all generic tree functionality in Node) you can make Node a so called "mix-in" class like

template <class N>
class Node : public N {
public:
  void addChild(Node<N>*);
protected:
  Node<N>* parent;
  vector<Node<N>*> children;
};

class SpecialNodeBase {
  // Here comes all "special" data/methods for your "special" tree
};

typedef Node<SpecialNodeBase> SpecialNode;

After that you can construct a tree of SpecialNode objects and use all methods from SpecialNodeBase as well as additional tree-managing functions from Node

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Wow...that's pretty sweet. Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. –  jaehoony Aug 17 '10 at 23:10
    
I might point out that by doing this, you've effectively defeated the purpose of inheritance - SpecialNode is no longer derived from Node, instead you end up creating independent classes with the same set of member variables. –  casablanca Aug 17 '10 at 23:17
    
I also was about to point out this 'inversion of inheritance' :). In fact, mix-ins can be used to model orthogonal (cross-cutting) features, for which inheritance would be suboptimal: Suppose you want to organize cars and persons in a tree. Neither cars nor persons 'are a' Node (which inheritance would mean). Using a Node<Car> resp. Node<Person> notion could be read as "Node of Car" and "Node of Person" which is imo more appropriate to this situation. –  MartinStettner Aug 17 '10 at 23:32
    
Note that the first version had an error: You have to use Node<N>* for parent, children and addChild (instead of N*) –  MartinStettner Aug 17 '10 at 23:35
    
In your example Node is a generic container for other objects - in that case, it's fine. I thought the OP's specialNode was a specialization of Node itself, since he also mentioned a specialTree. –  casablanca Aug 18 '10 at 0:18
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Because addChild function in your child class is not polymorphism, make it virtual, but overloading functions across base/child members is not allowed, so we have to change the addChild parameter in the child class:

class Node{
    virtual void addChild(Node*);
    ...
}

class specialNode : public Node{
    virtual void addChild(Node*);
    ...
}

Now, it should work.


If you want to access to the childeren variable from the child class (specialNode class), you should cast it. For example:

specialNode* var = static_cast<specialNode*>(children[i]);

Since we declared addChild as a virtual function, then we should use dynamic_cast instead of static_cast if we aren't sure that children[i] is always an instance of specialNode class, and thus it is better to use dynamic_cast:

specialNode* var = dynamic_cast<specialNode*>(children[i]);
if(var != NULL)
{
    //...
}
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Thanks for your answer..but not exactly what the question was about. Also, I'm pretty sure addChild(specialNode*) would just cover the scope of addChild(node*) –  jaehoony Aug 17 '10 at 23:04
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If I understand correctly, the "Mix-in" class solution won't allow you to call addChild from functions implemented by SpecialNodeBaseClass.

You can actually do the following:

template <class recursiveT>
class Base {
public:

     Base(dataType data) { populate children with data; }

     void addChild() { something base class appropriate; }

protected:
     std::vector<recursiveT> children;
};




class Derived: public Base<Derived> {
public:
     /* note: the constructor here will actually call the 
        constuctor of the base class */
     Derived(dataType data) : Base<Derived>(data) {} 
     /* other special functions go here.  */
};

This may look a little crazy, but it compiles cleanly for me on several GCC versions so I'm inclined to believe it's not totally wrong-headed. You should now be able to call the functions of Base from inside Derived.

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You will definitely have to cast the Node * to a specialNode * at some point, but you can make this clean and easy to manage by doing this in only one place. You could add a member function, say getParent and override it in specialNode, like this:

class Node {
  ...
  virtual Node *getParent() {
    return parent;
  }
};

class specialNode : public Node {
  ...
  specialNode *getParent() {
    return dynamic_cast<specialNode *>(parent);
  }
};

Of course, this is assuming that specialNodes always have other specialNodes as parent/children. If you mix Nodes and specialNodes, this obviously won't work.

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You'll run into troubles if you define two otherwise identical functions with different return type (there are two getParent methods which only differ by the type of their return value) –  MartinStettner Aug 17 '10 at 23:04
1  
@MartinStettner: Have a look at Covariant Return Types in C++ - this is allowed in the case of derived classes. –  casablanca Aug 17 '10 at 23:12
    
You're right, I was wrong, sorry. –  MartinStettner Aug 17 '10 at 23:23
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