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How Can be child class constructor class neutralize a parent constructor?

I mean in Child constructor we have to use super()- does a way to create a parent object exist?

Example with super:

class abstract Parent{
  protected String name; 
  public Parent(String name){
    this.name=name;
  }
}

class Child extends Parent{
  public Child(String name,int count){
    super(name);
  }    
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You extend the parent object, which is initialized when you initialize the child. Well as a requirement to be initialized, the parent requires a name. This can only be given in the initialization of the child object.

So to answer you question, no

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"Parent" and "child" are not appropriate words here. A child is not a type of parent (I certainly hope my children aren't for at least another decade, but that's another matter).

Consider the same code with different names:

class abstract Animal{
protected String name; 
public Animal(String name){
 this.name=name;
 }
}

class Elephant extends Animal{
public Elephant(String name,int count){
  super(name);
}

}

Now, how can you have an elephant that isn't an animal?

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You can't. By declaring "extends Animal" as part of the elephant class, you have subclassed Elephant. All elephants will be animals. –  user1091739 Dec 10 '11 at 23:04
1  
@Joshua: Actually, Elephant is the subclass (as in the noun). It subclasses Animal (as in the verb). –  BoltClock Dec 11 '11 at 14:01

Why would you be subclassing something but not constructing it? If your code requires that, that's probably because of bad design. Java does require that you call the parent's constructor.

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A child class can change what the objects in a parent constructor point to via super.ParentClassVariable = thingToBeChanged;

class Parent
{
    BufferedReader inKeyboard;
    public Parent()
    {
        inKeyboard = new BufferedReader (new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    }
}

class Child extends Parent
{ 
    public Child()
    {
        super.inKeyboard = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(filename)); 
    }//changes the pointer in the parent object to point to a different reader
}

Now the when you make a child object, instead of having methods in Parent use ...(System.in) as input, the methods in Parent will use ...(filename)

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