Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble creating a port in Unix. This code keeps returning "Error creating socket (3)", which makes no sense whatsoever, since sockfd must be smaller than 0 to print the error line.

server.c:

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
  int sockfd;
  struct sockaddr_in server_sockaddr;
  char buff[TRANSFER_BUFFER_LEN];

  /* check number of command line arguments */
  if (argc < 2)
  {
    fprintf (stderr, "Usage: %s <port>\n");
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  /* create server socket */
  if ((sockfd = createUdpSocket (&sockfd,
                                 &server_sockaddr,
                                 atoi (*(argv + 1)))
      ) < 0);
  {
    fprintf (stderr, "Error creating socket (%d).\n", sockfd);
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  ...

return 0;
}

socket_utils.h:

int createUdpSocket (int *sockfd, struct sockaddr_in *client_sockaddr, int port)
{
  /* create socket */
  if ((*sockfd = socket (AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0)) == -1)
    return -1;

  memset (client_sockaddr, 0, sizeof (struct sockaddr_in));
  client_sockaddr->sin_family = AF_INET;
  client_sockaddr->sin_addr.s_addr = htonl (INADDR_ANY);
  client_sockaddr->sin_port = htons (port);

  /* bind socket */
  if (!bind (*sockfd, (struct sockaddr*) &client_sockaddr, sizeof (sockfd)))
  {
    close (*sockfd);
    return -2;
  }

  return *sockfd;
}

Any ideas? This same function works fine in my client program that doesn't take a port value (instead takes 0).

Cheers,

Rhys

share|improve this question
    
Which port # are you trying to open? Ports <= 1024 require privileges. –  S.Lott Aug 18 '10 at 1:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
if ((sockfd = createUdpSocket (&sockfd,
                                 &server_sockaddr,
                                 atoi (*(argv + 1)))
      ) < 0);

Whoops, where'd that semi-colon come from? You've got a stowaway!


Also, this line won't do what you expect:

if (!bind (*sockfd, (struct sockaddr*) &client_sockaddr, sizeof (sockfd)))

The bind() function returns 0 on success, -1 on failure. Your test is backwards and will error out when bind succeeds rather than fails. It's also got an incorrect & where you say &client_sockaddr. And the third argument needs to be the size of the sockaddr_in struct, not sizeof(sockfd). Try:

if (bind (*sockfd, (struct sockaddr*) client_sockaddr, sizeof (struct sockaddr_in)) != 0)

And heck while we're here, your usage printout is missing its argv[0] argument:

fprintf (stderr, "Usage: %s <port>\n");
share|improve this answer
    
Oh the shame! Thanks very much. –  Rhys van der Waerden Aug 18 '10 at 2:19

Looks like you have too many parentheses which is confusing the code and yourself....Also, here is a useful guide to understanding network programming with sockets courtesy of beej...

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers, this looks good. –  Rhys van der Waerden Aug 18 '10 at 2:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.