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I have a table where I'm recording if a user has viewed an object at least once, hence:

 HasViewed
     ObjectID  number (FK to Object table)
     UserId    number (FK to Users table)

Both fields are NOT NULL and together form the Primary Key.

My question is, since I don't care how many times someone has viewed an object (after the first), I have two options for handling inserts.

  • Do a SELECT count(*) ... and if no records are found, insert a new record.
  • Always just insert a record, and if it throws a DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX exceptions (indicating that there already was such a record), just ignore it.

What's the downside of choosing the second option?

UPDATE:

I guess the best way to put it is : "Is the overhead caused by the exception worse than the overhead caused by the initial select?"

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I would normally just insert and trap the DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX exception, as this is the simplest to code. This is more efficient than checking for existence before inserting. I don't consider doing this a "bad smell" (horrible phrase!) because the exception we handle is raised by Oracle - it's not like raising your own exceptions as a flow-control mechanism.

Thanks to Igor's comment I have now run two different benchamrks on this: (1) where all insert attempts except the first are duplicates, (2) where all inserts are not duplicates. Reality will lie somewhere between the two cases.

Note: tests performed on Oracle 10.2.0.3.0.

Case 1: Mostly duplicates

It seems that the most efficient approach (by a significant factor) is to check for existence WHILE inserting:

prompt 1) Check DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX
begin
   for i in 1..1000 loop
      begin
         insert into hasviewed values(7782,20);
      exception
         when dup_val_on_index then
            null;
      end;
   end loop
   rollback;
end;
/

prompt 2) Test if row exists before inserting
declare
   dummy integer;
begin
   for i in 1..1000 loop
      select count(*) into dummy
      from hasviewed
      where objectid=7782 and userid=20;
      if dummy = 0 then
         insert into hasviewed values(7782,20);
      end if;
   end loop;
   rollback;
end;
/

prompt 3) Test if row exists while inserting
begin
   for i in 1..1000 loop
      insert into hasviewed
      select 7782,20 from dual
      where not exists (select null
                        from hasviewed
                        where objectid=7782 and userid=20);
   end loop;
   rollback;
end;
/

Results (after running once to avoid parsing overheads):

1) Check DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.54
2) Test if row exists before inserting

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.59
3) Test if row exists while inserting

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.20

Case 2: no duplicates

prompt 1) Check DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX
begin
   for i in 1..1000 loop
      begin
         insert into hasviewed values(7782,i);
      exception
         when dup_val_on_index then
            null;
      end;
   end loop
   rollback;
end;
/

prompt 2) Test if row exists before inserting
declare
   dummy integer;
begin
   for i in 1..1000 loop
      select count(*) into dummy
      from hasviewed
      where objectid=7782 and userid=i;
      if dummy = 0 then
         insert into hasviewed values(7782,i);
      end if;
   end loop;
   rollback;
end;
/

prompt 3) Test if row exists while inserting
begin
   for i in 1..1000 loop
      insert into hasviewed
      select 7782,i from dual
      where not exists (select null
                        from hasviewed
                        where objectid=7782 and userid=i);
   end loop;
   rollback;
end;
/

Results:

1) Check DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.15
2) Test if row exists before inserting

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.76
3) Test if row exists while inserting

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.71

In this case DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX wins by a mile. Note the "select before insert" is the slowest in both cases.

So it appears that you should choose option 1 or 3 according to the relative likelihood of inserts being or not being duplicates.

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Make sure that you run Tony's benchmarks in your environment. I know we had some problems in a 10.2.0.2 or 10.2.0.3 database on AIX where the exception path became drastically slower-- code that worked fine in 9.2 slowed to a crawl. There was a patch to resolve the issue, but it was an annoyance. –  Justin Cave Dec 10 '08 at 0:07
    
The test is where there are duplicates. What's the performance like when the new row isn't a duplicate (ie the one with the explicit check is still doing the check but the exception handler doesn't need to kick in). –  Gary Myers Dec 10 '08 at 6:02

I don't think there is a downside to your second option. I think it's a perfectly valid use of the named exception, plus it avoids the lookup overhead.

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Try this?

SELECT 1
FROM TABLE
WHERE OBJECTID = 'PRON_172.JPG' AND
      USERID='JCURRAN'

It should return 1, if there is one there, otherwise NULL.

In your case, it looks safe to ignore, but for performance, one should avoid exceptions on the common path. A question to ask, "How common will the exceptions be?" Few enough to ignore? or so many another method should be used?

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This will raise exception NO_DATA_FOUND if there is no row, it will not return NULL. –  Tony Andrews Dec 9 '08 at 11:00
    
Yep. I'm thinking sql, and it is a pl/sql question. –  EvilTeach Jan 5 '09 at 19:54

Usually, exception handling is slower; however if it would happen only seldom, then you would avoid the overhead of the query.
I think it mainly depends on the frequency of the exception, but if performance is important, I would suggest some benchmarking with both approaches.

Generally speaking, treating common events as exception is a bad smell; for this reason you could see also from another point of view.
If it is an exception, then it should be treated as an exception - and your approach is correct.
If it is a common event, then you should try to explicitly handle it - and then checking if the record is already inserted.

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Catching the DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX exception is faster then checking for existence - as I will demonstrate in my answer. As for the "bad smell", I see nothing wrong in trapping an exception raised by Oracle and handling it appropriately - this is different to raising your OWN exception for a non-error. –  Tony Andrews Dec 9 '08 at 10:52
    
I do not agree. The very name "exception" tells us exceptions should not be used for normal program flow, no matter their origin. Otherwise it is a bad smell. Besides, your answer demonstrate that preventing the exception is the fastest way (see results for "Test if row exists while inserting"). –  Roberto Liffredo Dec 9 '08 at 11:46
1  
No it doesn't, it demonstrates the exact opposite! It is ludicrous not to use the best tool for the job just because you don't like the "smell" of its name!! –  Tony Andrews Apr 29 '09 at 15:23

IMHO it is best to go with Option 2: Other than what is already been said, you should consider thread safety. If you go with option 1 and If multiple threads are executing your PL/SQL block then its possible that two or more threads fire select at the same time and at that time there is no record, this will end up leading all threads to insert and you will get unique constraint error.

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