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What is the least amount of code you can write to create, sort (ascending), and print a list of 100 random positive integers? By least amount of code I mean characters contained in the entire source file, so get to minifying.

I'm interested in seeing the answers using any and all programming languages. Let's try to keep one answer per language, edit the previous to correct or simplify. If you can't edit, comment?

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locked by Shog9 Apr 3 '15 at 16:45

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8  
Don't these questions always end up with someone defining a runtime environment that does exactly the right thing with 1 keypress? – Albert Dec 8 '08 at 21:20
3  
It seems that someone defined a runtime named J to implement exactly the right thing with 10 keypresses :P – yfeldblum Aug 3 '09 at 16:23

63 Answers 63

Prolog, 78 characters:

r([]).
r([H|T]):-random(0,1000000,H),r(T).
f(L):-length(R,100),r(R),sort(R,L).

usage in the REPL:

| ?- f(X).

X = [1251,4669,8789,8911,14984,23742,56213,57037,63537,91400,92620,108276,119079,142333,147308,151550,165893,166229,168975,174102,193298,205352,209594,225097,235321,266204,272888,275878,297271,301940,303985,345550,350280,352111,361328,364440,375854,377868,385223,392425,425140,445678,450775,457946,462066,468444,479858,484924,491882,504791,513519,517089,519866,531646,539337,563568,571166,572387,584991,587890,599029,601745,607147,607666,608947,611480,657287,663024,677185,691162,699737,710479,726470,726654,734985,743713,744415,746582,751525,779632,783294,802581,802856,808715,822814,837585,840118,843627,858917,862213,875946,895935,918762,925689,949127,955871,988494,989959,996765,999664]

yes

As some of my teachers would say, it's self explanatory :-)

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Golfscript - 15 chars

[100.{rand}+*]$
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xkcd-style Python answer - shorter than the current one!

print [4]*100

Real answer, 63 chars:

from random import*;print sorted(randrange(9e9)for i in[0]*100)
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Python (interactive):

import random
[int(9*random.random())]

What? It creates a list of one random integer, sorts it (trivially), and prints it out.

Ok, here's a serious answer

import random
sorted([int(9*random.random()) for x in range(9)])

It generates 9 random integers in [0, 9), sorts them, and prints them (in an interactive shell).

And here's a shorter variant that actually produces the 100 required:

from random import*
sorted(randint(0,9)for x in' '*100)
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#!perl

print join "\n", sort { $a <=> $b } map { int rand 0xFFFFFFFF } 1 .. 100;
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C#:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class App
{
  static void Main()
  {
    List<int> TheList = new List<int>();
    Random r = new Random();
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ )
      TheList.Add(r.Next());
    TheList.Sort();
    foreach ( int i in TheList )
      Console.WriteLine(i);
  }
}

If you're going for the raw character count you might be able to compress this a bit more. But basically this is it.

Edit: Attempt 2:

using System;

class App
{
  static void Main()
  {
    Random r= new Random();
    for ( int i = 0, j=0; i < 100; i++ )
      Console.WriteLine(j+=r.Next(int.MaxValue/100));
  }
}
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1  
Clever way of bypassing the sort by making sure the next number is greater than the last... – BenAlabaster Dec 8 '08 at 21:52
2  
What? Did someone say something about distribution? – Vilx- Aug 6 '09 at 12:54

Perl command line:

perl -e 'print $_, "\n" foreach sort map {int rand 10} (1..10)'

Prints 10 integers between 0 and 9 and sorts them.

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I wouldn't accept that as program spec, too imprecise! :-)

Lua version:

t=table;l={}for i=1,20 do l[#l+1]=math.random(99)end;t.sort(l)print(t.concat(l,' '))

Might be slightly shortened, there might be smarter code too.

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A command line PHP one-liner (yes, the trailing semicolon is required...)

php -r 'while (++$i % 101) $j[] = rand(0, 99); sort($j); echo implode(" ", $j)."\n";'
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Java:

  public void randList()
  {
  final int NUM_INTS = 100;
  Random r = new Random();
  List<Integer> s = new ArrayList<Integer>();

  for(int i = 0; i < NUM_INTS; i++)
    s.add(r.nextInt());

  Collections.sort(s);

  for(Integer i : s)
    System.out.println(i);
  }

Could be shorter, but the above is pretty clear and mostly-best-practices-compliant. This will generate warnings (raw types) and has bad variable names but is a little shorter.

  void rl()
  {
  Random r = new Random();
  List s = new ArrayList();

  for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    s.add(r.nextInt());

  for(Object i : s)
    System.out.println((Integer) i);
  }
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This is not a joke. It's the best I can do at the moment. :)

JavaScript:

a=[];for(i=0;i<100;i++){b=Math.round(Math.random()*100);a[i]=b;}c=0;
while(c==0){c=1;for(j=0;j<99;j++){if(a[j]>a[j+1]){d=a[j];a[j]=a[j+1];a[j+1]=d;c=0;}}}
for(k=0;k<100;k++)document.write(a[k],"<br>")
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1  
<<0 for parseInt is a nice touch :) – Jimmy Dec 9 '08 at 22:58

Here's the best I can do with a Delphi 2007 Win32 console app (aside from removing some line breaks and indents):

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
var a:array[0..99] of integer; i,j,k:integer;
begin
  FOR i:=0 to 99 DO a[i]:=random(maxint)+1;
  FOR i:=0 to 98 DO
    FOR j:=i+1 to 99 DO
      IF a[j]<a[i] THEN begin
        k:=a[i]; a[i]:=a[j]; a[j]:=k
      end;
  FOR i:=0 to 99 DO writeln(a[i])
end.

AFAIK, none of the standard units contain a sorting routine, so I had to write the shortest one I know. Also, since I haven't called Randomize, it produces the same result every time it's run.

Edit: I took "positive integers" to mean every positive (non-zero) number in the range of the integer type, hence the use of maxint (a system constant) and "+1" to ensure it's not zero.

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Plain old C, not so minimal as to be obfuscated:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
static int cmp(const void *a, const void *b)
{
    return *(const int *) a > *(const int *) b;
}
int main(void)
{
    int x[100], i;
    for(i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            x[i] = rand();
    qsort(x, 100, sizeof *x, cmp);
    for(i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            printf("%d\n", x[i]);
    return 0;
}

This builds without warnings using gcc 4.1.2 in Linux. In real code, I would of course:

  • Return EXIT_SUCCESS rather than 0
  • Only write the 100 once, and use sizeof x for the remaining references
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Pike

void main() {
  array a=({});
  while (sizeof(a)<100) a+=({random(1<<30)});
  sort(a);
  foreach (a, int b) write("%d\n",b);
}
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Erlang, 157 chars

-module (intpr).
-export ([q/0]).
q() ->
	lists:foldl(
	fun(X,A)->io:format("~p,",[X]),A end, 
	n, 
	lists:sort( 
		lists:map(fun(_)->random:uniform(100) end, lists:seq(1,100)) 
	)
	).

Sure it's not the best erlang solution, basically it creates a list from 1 to 100 (only because I didn't found a better/shorter way to initialize the list) and map every item with a random integer (<100), then the resulting list is sorted. Finally the list is "folded", used just as a way to get through all the items and print them.

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You would think SQL would be good at this sort of thing:-

SELECT * FROM
(SELECT TRUNC(dbms_random.value(1,100)) r
FROM user_objects
WHERE rownum < 101)
ORDER BY r

That's an Oracle version in 108 characters. Someone might do better in a different variant using a TOP 100 syntax.

Edit, in 82 characters:

select trunc(dbms_random.value(1,100))
from dual 
connect by level < 101
order by 1
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VB - 151 chars:

Not quite as elegant as C# sadly...

Sub Main()
    Dim r = New Random
    Enumerable.Range(1, 100) _
      .Select(Function(i) r.Next) _
      .OrderBy(Function(i) i) _
      .ToList _
      .ForEach(AddressOf Console.WriteLine)
End Sub
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Delphi... alphabetically sorted version

program PrintRandomSorted;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses SysUtils,Classes;

var I:Byte;
begin
  with TStringList.Create do
  begin
    for I in [0..99] do
      Add(IntToStr(Random(MaxInt)));
    Sort; Write(Text); Free;
  end;
end.


Properly sorted, using generics..

program PrintRandomSorted;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses SysUtils, generics.collections;
var I:Byte;S:String;
begin
  with TList<Integer>.Create do
  begin
    for I in [0..99] do Add(Random(MaxInt));
    Sort;
    for I in [0..99] do WriteLn(Items[I]);
    Free;
  end;
end.
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Notice that nobody gave an answer in C or C++ ?

Once they were called high-level languages (compared to assembler). Well I guess now they are the low-level.

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Common Lisp (as I remember it, might have a few details wrong):

(setf a '(99 61 47))
(setf a (sort a))
(princ a)

The numbers are of course random; I chose them right now by dice roll.

(Maybe we could tighten up the definition a little?)

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I can't edit or comment, so here's Java v3 (the previous 2 had negative numbers):

import java.util.TreeSet;

class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Collection<Double> s = new TreeSet<Double>();
        while (s.size() < 100) s.add(Math.random());
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
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python, 71 chars

import random
print sorted(random.randint(0,2**31)for i in range(100))
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Coldfusion:

<cfloop index="i" to="100" from="1">
    <cfset a[i] = randrange(1,10000)>
</cfloop>

<cfset ArraySort(a, "numeric")>

<cfdump var="#a#">
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Qt4 version (c++), 116 chars.

#include <QtCore>
int main(){QList<int>l;int i=101;while(--i)l<<qrand()%101;qSort(l);foreach(i,l)printf("%d\n",i);}

-> wc -c main.cpp
116 main.cpp
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C#

var sequence = Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
                         .OrderBy(n => n * n * (new Random()).Next());

foreach (var el in sequence.OrderBy(n => n))
    Console.Out.WriteLine(el);

F#

let rnd = System.Random(System.DateTime.Now.Millisecond)

List.init 100 (fun _ -> rnd.Next(100)) 
|> List.sort 
|> List.iter (fun (x: int) -> System.Console.Out.WriteLine(x))
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prints random 100 random numbers in the range [0,100] sorted in C++

srand((unsigned int)time(NULL)); list<int> r;
for (int i=0;i<100;i++) r.push_back((int)((100)*rand()/(float)RAND_MAX));
r.sort();
for (list<int>::iterator j=r.begin();j!=r.end();j++) cout << *j << endl;

If you don't care about parity then replace r.push_back((int)((100)*rand()/(float)RAND_MAX)) with r.push_back(rand()%(101))

--

Here's a complete program in 200 characters:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <random>
using namespace std;int main(){int a[100];generate_n(a,100,tr1::mt19937());sort(a,a+100);for(int i=0;i<100;++i){cout<<a[i]<<endl;}return 0;}

Array notation was shorter than any standard container I could find. tr1::mt19937 was the shortest random number generator I could find. using namespace std; was shorter than several instances of std::.

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C without allocating an array (basically keeps adding a random integer to the last value printed, which implicitly sorts):

#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i;
    unsigned long baseline = 0;
    srand(atoi(argv[1]));
    for ( i = 0 ; i < 100 ; i++ ) {
    	baseline += rand();
    	printf("%ld\n", baseline);
    }

}

which, with the usual obfuscation+removal of newlines, goes down to 136 chars.

ps: run with $RANDOM on the command line, obviously.

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C#

var r=new Random();
var l=from i in new C[100] let n=r.Next() orderby n select n;

81 characters (including newlines)

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Matlab:

arrayfun( @(x) display(x), sort( rand(1,100) ) )
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Using C - 152 chars

main(){int a=100,b,t,x[a];while(a--)x[a]=rand();a=100;while(b=a--)while(b--)if(x[a]>x[b]){t=x[a];x[a]=x[b];x[b]=t;}a=100;while(a--)printf("%d\n",x[a]);}

or expanded

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a=100,b,t,x[a];

    while(a--)x[a]=rand();
    a=100;

    while(b=a--)
        while(b--)
            if(x[a]>x[b])
            {
                t=x[a];
                x[a]=x[b];
                x[b]=t;
            }

    a=100;
    while(a--)
        printf("%d\n",x[a]);
}
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