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I have a designer working at the ASPX level. He doesn't do C#, doesn't do code-behinds, doesn't compile, etc. He's a pure designer, working with HTML and server controls.

I need a conditional control -- an If...Then-ish type thing. Normally, I would do this:

<asp:Placeholder Visible='<%# DateTime.Now.Day == 1 %>' runat="server">
  It's the first day of the month!
</asp:PlaceHolder>

Is there any way to do something like this without the databinding syntax? Something like:

<asp:If test="DateTime.Now.Day == 1" runat="server">
  It's the first day of the month!
</asp:If>

Is there some kind of way to extend a placeholder to allow this? I've fiddled around a bit, but in the end, I have a conditional that I essentially have to compile.

Now, there's nothing wrong with the databinding syntax, but's just one more bit of...weirdness, the a designer is going to have to understand. Additionally, it doesn't give me "else" statements. Something like this would be great...

<asp:If test="DateTime.Now.Day == 1" runat="server">
  It's the first day of the month!
  <asp:Else>
    It's not the first day of the month!
  </asp:Else>
</asp:If>
share|improve this question
    
if i had this problem i'd put two Panel controls, one for each condition, set their respective visible attributes myself, and just tell my programmer to code each one properly. This would naturally lead me to insert testing infrastructure at the same time. – Aaron Anodide Aug 30 '10 at 14:45
up vote 0 down vote accepted
+100

The data-binding syntax has two problems: first it's a little weirder for your designer vs. using plain text, and second it requires the designer to remember to invert the "if" test in your "else" block.

The first problem may annoy your designer a little, but the second problem is much more severe, because it forces your designer to think like a programmer (inverting boolean logic!) and makes every if/else block into a possible bug you need to test for after your designer hands over a template.

My suggestion: use data-binding syntax, but fix the more severe problem by creating custom controls that only require data-binding test code on the If control, but not on the Else control. Sure your designers will have to type a few more characters, but the other more severe problems won't apply and your performance won't suffer as it would if you had to dynamically compile code each time your page ran.

Here's an example I coded up to illustrate:

<%@ Page Language="C#"%>
<%@ Register Assembly="ElseTest" TagPrefix="ElseTest" Namespace="ElseTest"%>

<script runat="server">
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DataBind();
    }
</script>

<html>
<body>

    <ElseTest:IfControl runat="server" visible="<%#1 == 1 %>">
        This should be visible (in "if" area) 
    </ElseTest:IfControl>
    <ElseTest:ElseControl runat="server">
        This should not be visible (in "else" area) 
    </ElseTest:ElseControl>

    <br /><br />

    <ElseTest:IfControl runat="server" visible="<%#0 == 1 %>">
        This should not be visible (in "if" area) 
    </ElseTest:IfControl>
    <ElseTest:ElseControl runat="server">
        This should be visible (in "else" area) 
    </ElseTest:ElseControl>

</body>
</html>

Here's the underlying controls, which are simply wrappers around asp:Literal:

using System;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

[assembly: TagPrefix("ElseTest", "ElseTest")]
namespace ElseTest
{
    // simply renames a literal to allow blocks of data-bound-visibility
    [ToolboxData("<{0}:IfControl runat=\"server\"></{0}:IfControl>")]
    public class IfControl : Literal
    {
    }

    [ToolboxData("<{0}:ElseControl runat=\"server\"></{0}:ElseControl>")]
    public class ElseControl : Literal
    {
        public override bool Visible
        {
            get
            {
                // find previous control (which must be an IfControl). 
                // If it's visible, we're not (and vice versa)
                for (int i = Parent.Controls.IndexOf(this)-1; i >= 0; i--)
                {
                    Control c = Parent.Controls[i];
                    if (c is IfControl)
                        return !c.Visible;  // found it! render children if the if control is not visible
                    else if (c is Literal)
                    {
                        // literals with only whitespace are OK. everything else is an error between if and then
                        Literal l = c as Literal;
                        string s = l.Text.Trim();
                        if (s.Length > 0)
                            throw new ArgumentException("ElseControl must be immediately after an IfControl");
                    }
                }
                throw new ArgumentException("ElseControl must be immediately after an IfControl");
            }
            set
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Visible property of an ElseControl is read-only");
            }
        }
    }
}

If you want it more concise, you can easily shorten the tag name (by changing the class names and/or tag prefix). You can also create a new property (e.g. "test") to use instead of "Visible".

If you really want to get rid of the <%# %>, there are likley many different tricks you can use to leverage CodeDOM or other ways to dynamically compile code, although performance will be a challenge since you'll probably end up dynamically compiling code each time the page runs, it may introduce pesky security issues, and more. I'd stay away from that.

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite what I was looking for, but it's well thought out and a step in the right direction. – Deane Aug 30 '10 at 14:43

Instead of writing control

asp:If

why not use:

<% if expression
       { %>
    Yellow
    <% } %>
    <% else
        {%>
    Red
    <% } %>
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this won't work if the expression relies on runtime data generated in Page_Load, in postback code, etc. because the expression above is evaluated very early in the page lifecycle before server-side event handlers are run. – Justin Grant Aug 27 '10 at 6:27

Taking into account that codebehind files are out as the designer probably not got VS, I think a simpler solution with less code may be more preferential:

<%@ Page Language="C#"%>

<script runat="server">
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (DateTime.Now.Day == 1)
        {
            DateTestPanelFirst.visible = true;
            DateTestPanelOther.visible = false;
        }
    }
</script>

<html>
<body>

<asp:panel runat="server" id="DateTestPanelFirst" visible="false">
  It's the first day of the month!
<asp:panel>

<asp:panel runat="server" id="DateTestPanelOther">
    It's not the first day of the month!
<asp:panel>

</body>
</html>

the <asp:panel> could be changed to another type of web control, like <asp:label> etc. I think almost all dot net controls have the visible property, so you can hide/show them at any time.

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