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There are 100 numbers:

1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3,.. 50, 50.

How can I get a sequence which has one number between the two 1s, two numbers between the two 2s, three numbers between the two 3s,.. and fifty numbers between the two 50s using the hundred numbers?

Does anyone have a better idea than brute force? Or prove it there's no solution when n = 50.

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1  
Example for 8 numbers 1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4 The sequence is like 4,1,3,1,2,4,3,2. Hope it helpful. –  Zoozy Aug 18 '10 at 5:53
    
Are you sure, this is possible for all possible numbers? (It's not because it works with 4, it works for 50?) Try to program the algorithm, in the way you made your first solution. –  VeeWee Aug 18 '10 at 6:33
1  
I think you should express better what you want (maybe using "two" instead of "2" when referring to counting and not a literal number in the sequence, or use quotes, whatever), now it's very weird to read. –  fortran Aug 18 '10 at 6:46
1  
Interesting question. Comment: there are no solutions for n = 1 or n = 2. There are exactly two solutions for n = 3: {{3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2}, {2, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3}}. And exactly two for n = 4: {{4, 1, 3, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2}, {2, 3, 4, 2, 1, 3, 1, 4}}. –  Andrew Moylan Aug 18 '10 at 6:47
2  
@fortran A solution can't be a palindrome, because the subsequence 1 _ 1 containing all ones has odd length. –  starblue Aug 18 '10 at 11:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is only a solution to this problem for pairs of numbers from 1-n where n = 4m or n = 4m-1 for any positive integer m.

Update:

For any solution the odd number pairs must occupy two odd-numbered or two even-numbered positions. The even number pairs must occupy one of each. When there are an odd number of odd pairs (eg. 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 - 3 odd pairs) there is no solution. There's no way to place the first number of each pair, without resulting in a clash when you try to place the second.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langford_pairing

Another update:

My answer was basically from Knuth. I've been thinking it through, though, and came up with the following on my own.

For any sequence {1 1 2 2 ... n n} there are, say, m odd pairs, n-m even pairs, and 2n positions in which to place them (i.e. n positions of each parity).

If you place the even pairs first then you use n-m even positions and n-m odd positions, thus you have m positions of each parity left in which to place the odd pairs.

The odd pairs must be placed in positions of the same parity. If m is even there is no problem because half the pairs will will be placed in odd positions, and half in even positions.

If m is odd, however, you can only place m-1 of the odd pairs, at which point you'll have one odd pair left to place, and one position of each parity. As the odd pair requires positions of the same parity there is no solution when m (the number of odd pairs) is odd.

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1  
Thanks very much, but how to prove it? –  Zoozy Aug 18 '10 at 11:54

I adopted an elimination approach with paper and pencil for L(2,7).

  1. Place the two 7s. Just three possibilities
  2. Place the two 6s and so on.
  3. It is obvious when placing the 1s, 2s, and 3s simultaneously whether there is a solution or not.
  4. I found 18 of the 26 solutions thus.
  5. When time and paper permits I will tackle L(2,8).
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The Problem: Langford Pairing

The problem is known as Langford Pairing. From Wikipedia:

These sequences are named after C. Dudley Langford, who posed the problem of constructing them in 1958. As Knuth1 describes, the problem of listing ALL Langford pairings for a given N can be solved as an instance of the exact cover problem (one of Karp's 21 NP-complete problem), but for large N the number of solutions can be calculated more efficiently by algebraic methods.

1: The Art of Computer Programming, IV, Fascicle 0: Introduction to Combinatorial Algorithms and Boolean Functions

It's worth noting that there is no solution for N = 50. Solutions only exist for N = 4k or N = 4k - 1. This is proven in a paper by Roy A. Davies (On Langford's Problem II, Math. Gaz. 43, 253-255, 1959), which also gives the pattern to construct a single solution for any feasible N.

Related links


Brute force in Java

Here are some solutions that my quick and dirty brute force program was able to find for N < 100. Nearly all of these were found in under a second.

 3 [3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2]
 4 [4, 1, 3, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2]
 7 [7, 3, 6, 2, 5, 3, 2, 4, 7, 6, 5, 1, 4, 1]
 8 [8, 3, 7, 2, 6, 3, 2, 4, 5, 8, 7, 6, 4, 1, 5, 1]
11 [11, 6, 10, 2, 9, 3, 2, 8, 6, 3, 7, 5, 11, 10, 9, 4, 8, 5, 7, 1, 4, 1]
12 [12, 10, 11, 6, 4, 5, 9, 7, 8, 4, 6, 5, 10, 12, 11, 7, 9, 8, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2]
15 [15, 13, 14, 8, 5, 12, 7, 11, 4, 10, 5, 9, 8, 4, 7, 13, 15, 14, 12, 11, 10, 9, 6, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2, 6]
16 [16, 14, 15, 9, 7, 13, 3, 12, 6, 11, 3, 10, 7, 9, 8, 6, 14, 16, 15, 13, 12, 11, 10, 8, 5, 2, 4, 1, 2, 1, 5, 4]
19 [19, 17, 18, 14, 8, 16, 9, 15, 6, 1, 13, 1, 12, 8, 11, 6, 9, 10, 14, 17, 19, 18, 16, 15, 13, 12, 11, 7, 10, 3, 5, 2, 4, 3, 2, 7, 5, 4]
20 [20, 18, 19, 15, 11, 17, 10, 16, 9, 5, 14, 1, 13, 1, 12, 5, 11, 10, 9, 15, 18, 20, 19, 17, 16, 14, 13, 12, 8, 4, 7, 3, 6, 2, 4, 3, 2, 8, 7, 6]
23 [23, 21, 22, 18, 16, 20, 12, 19, 11, 8, 17, 4, 1, 15, 1, 14, 4, 13, 8, 12, 11, 16, 18, 21, 23, 22, 20, 19, 17, 15, 14, 13, 10, 7, 9, 3, 5, 2, 6, 3, 2, 7, 5, 10, 9, 6]
24 [24, 22, 23, 19, 17, 21, 13, 20, 10, 8, 18, 4, 1, 16, 1, 15, 4, 14, 8, 10, 13, 12, 17, 19, 22, 24, 23, 21, 20, 18, 16, 15, 14, 11, 12, 7, 9, 3, 5, 2, 6, 3, 2, 7, 5, 11, 9, 6]
27 [27, 25, 26, 22, 20, 24, 17, 23, 12, 13, 21, 7, 4, 19, 1, 18, 1, 4, 16, 7, 15, 12, 14, 13, 17, 20, 22, 25, 27, 26, 24, 23, 21, 19, 18, 16, 15, 14, 11, 9, 10, 5, 2, 8, 3, 2, 6, 5, 3, 9, 11, 10, 8, 6]
28 [28, 26, 27, 23, 21, 25, 18, 24, 15, 13, 22, 10, 6, 20, 1, 19, 1, 3, 17, 6, 16, 3, 10, 13, 15, 18, 21, 23, 26, 28, 27, 25, 24, 22, 20, 19, 17, 16, 14, 12, 9, 7, 11, 4, 2, 5, 8, 2, 4, 7, 9, 5, 12, 14, 11, 8]
31 [31, 29, 30, 26, 24, 28, 21, 27, 18, 16, 25, 13, 11, 23, 6, 22, 5, 1, 20, 1, 19, 6, 5, 17, 11, 13, 16, 18, 21, 24, 26, 29, 31, 30, 28, 27, 25, 23, 22, 20, 19, 17, 15, 12, 14, 9, 10, 2, 3, 4, 2, 8, 3, 7, 4, 9, 12, 10, 15, 14, 8, 7]
32 [32, 30, 31, 27, 25, 29, 22, 28, 19, 17, 26, 13, 11, 24, 6, 23, 5, 1, 21, 1, 20, 6, 5, 18, 11, 13, 16, 17, 19, 22, 25, 27, 30, 32, 31, 29, 28, 26, 24, 23, 21, 20, 18, 16, 15, 12, 14, 9, 10, 2, 3, 4, 2, 8, 3, 7, 4, 9, 12, 10, 15, 14, 8, 7]
35 [35, 33, 34, 30, 28, 32, 25, 31, 22, 20, 29, 17, 14, 27, 10, 26, 5, 6, 24, 1, 23, 1, 5, 21, 6, 10, 19, 14, 18, 17, 20, 22, 25, 28, 30, 33, 35, 34, 32, 31, 29, 27, 26, 24, 23, 21, 19, 18, 16, 13, 15, 12, 9, 4, 2, 11, 3, 2, 4, 8, 3, 7, 9, 13, 12, 16, 15, 11, 8, 7]
36 [36, 34, 35, 31, 29, 33, 26, 32, 23, 21, 30, 17, 14, 28, 10, 27, 5, 6, 25, 1, 24, 1, 5, 22, 6, 10, 20, 14, 19, 17, 18, 21, 23, 26, 29, 31, 34, 36, 35, 33, 32, 30, 28, 27, 25, 24, 22, 20, 19, 18, 16, 13, 15, 12, 9, 4, 2, 11, 3, 2, 4, 8, 3, 7, 9, 13, 12, 16, 15, 11, 8, 7]
40 [40, 38, 39, 35, 33, 37, 30, 36, 27, 25, 34, 22, 20, 32, 17, 31, 13, 11, 29, 7, 28, 3, 1, 26, 1, 3, 24, 7, 23, 11, 13, 21, 17, 20, 22, 25, 27, 30, 33, 35, 38, 40, 39, 37, 36, 34, 32, 31, 29, 28, 26, 24, 23, 21, 19, 16, 18, 15, 12, 4, 6, 14, 2, 5, 4, 2, 10, 6, 9, 5, 8, 12, 16, 15, 19, 18, 14, 10, 9, 8]
43 [43, 41, 42, 38, 36, 40, 33, 39, 30, 28, 37, 25, 23, 35, 20, 34, 16, 14, 32, 5, 31, 8, 6, 29, 2, 5, 27, 2, 26, 6, 8, 24, 14, 16, 22, 20, 23, 25, 28, 30, 33, 36, 38, 41, 43, 42, 40, 39, 37, 35, 34, 32, 31, 29, 27, 26, 24, 22, 21, 19, 17, 15, 18, 12, 7, 1, 3, 1, 13, 4, 3, 11, 7, 10, 4, 9, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 18, 13, 11, 10, 9]
44 [44, 42, 43, 39, 37, 41, 34, 40, 31, 29, 38, 26, 24, 36, 20, 35, 16, 14, 33, 5, 32, 8, 6, 30, 2, 5, 28, 2, 27, 6, 8, 25, 14, 16, 23, 20, 22, 24, 26, 29, 31, 34, 37, 39, 42, 44, 43, 41, 40, 38, 36, 35, 33, 32, 30, 28, 27, 25, 23, 22, 21, 19, 17, 15, 18, 12, 7, 1, 3, 1, 13, 4, 3, 11, 7, 10, 4, 9, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 18, 13, 11, 10, 9]
52 [52, 50, 51, 47, 45, 49, 42, 48, 39, 37, 46, 34, 32, 44, 29, 43, 26, 24, 41, 20, 40, 16, 14, 38, 7, 9, 36, 2, 35, 3, 2, 33, 7, 3, 31, 9, 30, 14, 16, 28, 20, 27, 24, 26, 29, 32, 34, 37, 39, 42, 45, 47, 50, 52, 51, 49, 48, 46, 44, 43, 41, 40, 38, 36, 35, 33, 31, 30, 28, 27, 25, 23, 21, 19, 22, 15, 8, 6, 1, 18, 1, 17, 4, 5, 6, 8, 13, 4, 12, 5, 11, 15, 10, 19, 21, 23, 25, 22, 18, 17, 13, 12, 11, 10]
55 [55, 53, 54, 50, 48, 52, 45, 51, 42, 40, 49, 37, 35, 47, 32, 46, 29, 27, 44, 23, 43, 20, 17, 41, 10, 11, 39, 4, 38, 8, 2, 36, 4, 2, 34, 10, 33, 11, 8, 31, 17, 30, 20, 23, 28, 27, 29, 32, 35, 37, 40, 42, 45, 48, 50, 53, 55, 54, 52, 51, 49, 47, 46, 44, 43, 41, 39, 38, 36, 34, 33, 31, 30, 28, 26, 24, 25, 21, 19, 16, 22, 9, 14, 6, 3, 18, 7, 5, 3, 15, 6, 9, 13, 5, 7, 12, 16, 14, 19, 21, 24, 26, 25, 22, 18, 15, 13, 1, 12, 1]
63 [63, 61, 62, 58, 56, 60, 53, 59, 50, 48, 57, 45, 43, 55, 40, 54, 37, 35, 52, 32, 51, 29, 27, 49, 23, 20, 47, 17, 46, 12, 9, 44, 10, 3, 42, 2, 41, 3, 2, 39, 9, 38, 12, 10, 36, 17, 20, 34, 23, 33, 27, 29, 32, 35, 37, 40, 43, 45, 48, 50, 53, 56, 58, 61, 63, 62, 60, 59, 57, 55, 54, 52, 51, 49, 47, 46, 44, 42, 41, 39, 38, 36, 34, 33, 31, 28, 30, 25, 26, 22, 19, 8, 18, 24, 11, 6, 4, 21, 5, 7, 8, 4, 6, 16, 5, 15, 11, 7, 13, 14, 19, 18, 22, 25, 28, 26, 31, 30, 24, 21, 16, 15, 13, 1, 14, 1]
64 [64, 62, 63, 59, 57, 61, 54, 60, 51, 49, 58, 46, 44, 56, 41, 55, 38, 36, 53, 33, 52, 29, 27, 50, 23, 20, 48, 17, 47, 12, 9, 45, 10, 3, 43, 2, 42, 3, 2, 40, 9, 39, 12, 10, 37, 17, 20, 35, 23, 34, 27, 29, 32, 33, 36, 38, 41, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54, 57, 59, 62, 64, 63, 61, 60, 58, 56, 55, 53, 52, 50, 48, 47, 45, 43, 42, 40, 39, 37, 35, 34, 32, 31, 28, 30, 25, 26, 22, 19, 8, 18, 24, 11, 6, 4, 21, 5, 7, 8, 4, 6, 16, 5, 15, 11, 7, 13, 14, 19, 18, 22, 25, 28, 26, 31, 30, 24, 21, 16, 15, 13, 1, 14, 1]
67 [67, 65, 66, 62, 60, 64, 57, 63, 54, 52, 61, 49, 47, 59, 44, 58, 41, 39, 56, 36, 55, 33, 30, 53, 26, 24, 51, 20, 50, 13, 11, 48, 12, 3, 46, 4, 45, 3, 7, 43, 4, 42, 11, 13, 40, 12, 7, 38, 20, 37, 24, 26, 35, 30, 34, 33, 36, 39, 41, 44, 47, 49, 52, 54, 57, 60, 62, 65, 67, 66, 64, 63, 61, 59, 58, 56, 55, 53, 51, 50, 48, 46, 45, 43, 42, 40, 38, 37, 35, 34, 32, 29, 31, 28, 25, 23, 21, 27, 18, 9, 10, 2, 5, 22, 2, 8, 6, 19, 5, 9, 17, 10, 16, 6, 8, 14, 15, 18, 21, 23, 25, 29, 28, 32, 31, 27, 22, 19, 17, 16, 14, 1, 15, 1]
72 [72, 70, 71, 67, 65, 69, 62, 68, 59, 57, 66, 54, 52, 64, 49, 63, 46, 44, 61, 41, 60, 38, 36, 58, 33, 30, 56, 27, 55, 23, 20, 53, 17, 14, 51, 10, 50, 5, 3, 48, 4, 47, 3, 5, 45, 4, 10, 43, 14, 42, 17, 20, 40, 23, 39, 27, 30, 37, 33, 36, 38, 41, 44, 46, 49, 52, 54, 57, 59, 62, 65, 67, 70, 72, 71, 69, 68, 66, 64, 63, 61, 60, 58, 56, 55, 53, 51, 50, 48, 47, 45, 43, 42, 40, 39, 37, 35, 32, 34, 31, 28, 26, 24, 22, 29, 15, 13, 8, 6, 25, 7, 12, 9, 11, 21, 6, 8, 19, 7, 18, 13, 15, 9, 16, 12, 11, 22, 24, 26, 28, 32, 31, 35, 34, 29, 25, 21, 19, 18, 2, 16, 1, 2, 1]
75 [75, 73, 74, 70, 68, 72, 65, 71, 62, 60, 69, 57, 55, 67, 52, 66, 49, 47, 64, 44, 63, 41, 39, 61, 36, 33, 59, 30, 58, 26, 24, 56, 20, 17, 54, 14, 53, 5, 6, 51, 7, 50, 3, 5, 48, 6, 3, 46, 7, 45, 14, 17, 43, 20, 42, 24, 26, 40, 30, 33, 38, 36, 39, 41, 44, 47, 49, 52, 55, 57, 60, 62, 65, 68, 70, 73, 75, 74, 72, 71, 69, 67, 66, 64, 63, 61, 59, 58, 56, 54, 53, 51, 50, 48, 46, 45, 43, 42, 40, 38, 37, 35, 32, 29, 34, 28, 25, 23, 31, 12, 15, 9, 11, 27, 21, 4, 13, 10, 8, 22, 4, 9, 12, 19, 11, 18, 15, 8, 10, 16, 13, 23, 25, 29, 28, 32, 21, 35, 37, 34, 31, 27, 22, 19, 18, 2, 16, 1, 2, 1]
76 [76, 74, 75, 71, 69, 73, 66, 72, 63, 61, 70, 58, 56, 68, 53, 67, 50, 48, 65, 45, 64, 42, 40, 62, 36, 33, 60, 30, 59, 26, 24, 57, 20, 17, 55, 14, 54, 5, 6, 52, 7, 51, 3, 5, 49, 6, 3, 47, 7, 46, 14, 17, 44, 20, 43, 24, 26, 41, 30, 33, 39, 36, 38, 40, 42, 45, 48, 50, 53, 56, 58, 61, 63, 66, 69, 71, 74, 76, 75, 73, 72, 70, 68, 67, 65, 64, 62, 60, 59, 57, 55, 54, 52, 51, 49, 47, 46, 44, 43, 41, 39, 38, 37, 35, 32, 29, 34, 28, 25, 23, 31, 12, 15, 9, 11, 27, 21, 4, 13, 10, 8, 22, 4, 9, 12, 19, 11, 18, 15, 8, 10, 16, 13, 23, 25, 29, 28, 32, 21, 35, 37, 34, 31, 27, 22, 19, 18, 2, 16, 1, 2, 1]
83 [83, 81, 82, 78, 76, 80, 73, 79, 70, 68, 77, 65, 63, 75, 60, 74, 57, 55, 72, 52, 71, 49, 47, 69, 44, 42, 67, 39, 66, 36, 33, 64, 30, 27, 62, 23, 61, 17, 14, 59, 15, 58, 7, 4, 56, 5, 11, 54, 4, 53, 7, 5, 51, 14, 50, 17, 15, 48, 11, 23, 46, 27, 45, 30, 33, 43, 36, 39, 42, 44, 47, 49, 52, 55, 57, 60, 63, 65, 68, 70, 73, 76, 78, 81, 83, 82, 80, 79, 77, 75, 74, 72, 71, 69, 67, 66, 64, 62, 61, 59, 58, 56, 54, 53, 51, 50, 48, 46, 45, 43, 41, 38, 40, 37, 34, 32, 29, 26, 35, 25, 16, 13, 24, 31, 8, 6, 3, 28, 12, 9, 3, 10, 6, 8, 22, 13, 21, 16, 20, 9, 19, 12, 10, 18, 26, 25, 29, 24, 32, 34, 38, 37, 41, 40, 35, 31, 28, 22, 21, 20, 19, 2, 18, 1, 2, 1]
84 [84, 82, 83, 79, 77, 81, 74, 80, 71, 69, 78, 66, 64, 76, 61, 75, 58, 56, 73, 53, 72, 50, 48, 70, 45, 43, 68, 39, 67, 36, 33, 65, 30, 27, 63, 23, 62, 17, 14, 60, 15, 59, 7, 4, 57, 5, 11, 55, 4, 54, 7, 5, 52, 14, 51, 17, 15, 49, 11, 23, 47, 27, 46, 30, 33, 44, 36, 39, 42, 43, 45, 48, 50, 53, 56, 58, 61, 64, 66, 69, 71, 74, 77, 79, 82, 84, 83, 81, 80, 78, 76, 75, 73, 72, 70, 68, 67, 65, 63, 62, 60, 59, 57, 55, 54, 52, 51, 49, 47, 46, 44, 42, 41, 38, 40, 37, 34, 32, 29, 26, 35, 25, 16, 13, 24, 31, 8, 6, 3, 28, 12, 9, 3, 10, 6, 8, 22, 13, 21, 16, 20, 9, 19, 12, 10, 18, 26, 25, 29, 24, 32, 34, 38, 37, 41, 40, 35, 31, 28, 22, 21, 20, 19, 2, 18, 1, 2, 1]
87 [87, 85, 86, 82, 80, 84, 77, 83, 74, 72, 81, 69, 67, 79, 64, 78, 61, 59, 76, 56, 75, 53, 51, 73, 48, 46, 71, 43, 70, 39, 36, 68, 33, 30, 66, 27, 65, 23, 17, 63, 14, 62, 16, 7, 60, 12, 3, 58, 4, 57, 3, 7, 55, 4, 54, 14, 17, 52, 12, 16, 50, 23, 49, 27, 30, 47, 33, 36, 45, 39, 44, 43, 46, 48, 51, 53, 56, 59, 61, 64, 67, 69, 72, 74, 77, 80, 82, 85, 87, 86, 84, 83, 81, 79, 78, 76, 75, 73, 71, 70, 68, 66, 65, 63, 62, 60, 58, 57, 55, 54, 52, 50, 49, 47, 45, 44, 42, 40, 41, 37, 35, 32, 38, 31, 28, 26, 24, 34, 8, 15, 9, 11, 6, 29, 13, 5, 10, 8, 25, 6, 9, 5, 22, 11, 21, 15, 20, 10, 13, 18, 19, 24, 26, 28, 32, 31, 35, 37, 40, 42, 41, 38, 34, 29, 25, 22, 21, 20, 18, 2, 19, 1, 2, 1]
95 [95, 93, 94, 90, 88, 92, 85, 91, 82, 80, 89, 77, 75, 87, 72, 86, 69, 67, 84, 64, 83, 61, 59, 81, 56, 54, 79, 51, 78, 48, 46, 76, 43, 40, 74, 36, 73, 33, 30, 71, 26, 70, 18, 15, 68, 17, 9, 66, 6, 65, 13, 14, 63, 4, 62, 6, 9, 60, 4, 15, 58, 18, 57, 17, 13, 55, 14, 26, 53, 30, 52, 33, 36, 50, 40, 49, 43, 46, 48, 51, 54, 56, 59, 61, 64, 67, 69, 72, 75, 77, 80, 82, 85, 88, 90, 93, 95, 94, 92, 91, 89, 87, 86, 84, 83, 81, 79, 78, 76, 74, 73, 71, 70, 68, 66, 65, 63, 62, 60, 58, 57, 55, 53, 52, 50, 49, 47, 45, 42, 39, 44, 38, 35, 32, 41, 31, 28, 34, 25, 37, 16, 12, 7, 11, 8, 3, 5, 10, 29, 3, 7, 27, 5, 8, 12, 11, 24, 16, 10, 23, 19, 20, 21, 22, 25, 28, 32, 31, 35, 39, 38, 42, 34, 45, 47, 44, 41, 37, 29, 27, 19, 24, 20, 23, 21, 2, 22, 1, 2, 1]
96 [96, 94, 95, 91, 89, 93, 86, 92, 83, 81, 90, 78, 76, 88, 73, 87, 70, 68, 85, 65, 84, 62, 60, 82, 57, 55, 80, 52, 79, 49, 46, 77, 43, 40, 75, 36, 74, 33, 30, 72, 26, 71, 18, 15, 69, 17, 9, 67, 6, 66, 13, 14, 64, 4, 63, 6, 9, 61, 4, 15, 59, 18, 58, 17, 13, 56, 14, 26, 54, 30, 53, 33, 36, 51, 40, 50, 43, 46, 48, 49, 52, 55, 57, 60, 62, 65, 68, 70, 73, 76, 78, 81, 83, 86, 89, 91, 94, 96, 95, 93, 92, 90, 88, 87, 85, 84, 82, 80, 79, 77, 75, 74, 72, 71, 69, 67, 66, 64, 63, 61, 59, 58, 56, 54, 53, 51, 50, 48, 47, 45, 42, 39, 44, 38, 35, 32, 41, 31, 28, 34, 25, 37, 16, 12, 7, 11, 8, 3, 5, 10, 29, 3, 7, 27, 5, 8, 12, 11, 24, 16, 10, 23, 19, 20, 21, 22, 25, 28, 32, 31, 35, 39, 38, 42, 34, 45, 47, 44, 41, 37, 29, 27, 19, 24, 20, 23, 21, 2, 22, 1, 2, 1]

For instructional purposes, here's the source code:

import java.util.*;

public class LangfordPairing {
    static void langford(int N) {
        BitSet bs = new BitSet();
        bs.set(N * 2);
        put(bs, N, new int[2 * N]);
    }
    static void put(BitSet bs, int n, int[] arr) {
        if (n == 0) {
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(arr));
            System.exit(0); // one is enough!
        }
        for (int i = -1, L = bs.length() - n - 1;
                    (i = bs.nextClearBit(i + 1)) < L ;) {

            final int j = i + n + 1;
            if (!bs.get(j)) {
                arr[i] = n;
                arr[j] = n;
                bs.flip(i);
                bs.flip(j);
                put(bs, n - 1, arr);
                bs.flip(i);
                bs.flip(j);
            }
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        langford(87);
    }
}

Solutions for some N values are missing; they are known to require an abnormally large number of operations just to find the first solution by brute force.

Note that as mentioned, there are generally many solutions for any given N. For N = 7, there are 26 solutions:

[7, 3, 6, 2, 5, 3, 2, 4, 7, 6, 5, 1, 4, 1]
[7, 2, 6, 3, 2, 4, 5, 3, 7, 6, 4, 1, 5, 1]
[7, 2, 4, 6, 2, 3, 5, 4, 7, 3, 6, 1, 5, 1]
[7, 3, 1, 6, 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 2, 6, 4, 2, 5]
[7, 1, 4, 1, 6, 3, 5, 4, 7, 3, 2, 6, 5, 2]
[7, 1, 3, 1, 6, 4, 3, 5, 7, 2, 4, 6, 2, 5]
[7, 4, 1, 5, 1, 6, 4, 3, 7, 5, 2, 3, 6, 2]
[7, 2, 4, 5, 2, 6, 3, 4, 7, 5, 3, 1, 6, 1]

[5, 7, 2, 6, 3, 2, 5, 4, 3, 7, 6, 1, 4, 1]
[3, 7, 4, 6, 3, 2, 5, 4, 2, 7, 6, 1, 5, 1]
[5, 7, 4, 1, 6, 1, 5, 4, 3, 7, 2, 6, 3, 2]
[5, 7, 2, 3, 6, 2, 5, 3, 4, 7, 1, 6, 1, 4]
[1, 7, 1, 2, 6, 4, 2, 5, 3, 7, 4, 6, 3, 5]
[5, 7, 1, 4, 1, 6, 5, 3, 4, 7, 2, 3, 6, 2]
[1, 7, 1, 2, 5, 6, 2, 3, 4, 7, 5, 3, 6, 4]
[2, 7, 4, 2, 3, 5, 6, 4, 3, 7, 1, 5, 1, 6]

[6, 2, 7, 4, 2, 3, 5, 6, 4, 3, 7, 1, 5, 1]
[2, 6, 7, 2, 1, 5, 1, 4, 6, 3, 7, 5, 4, 3]
[3, 6, 7, 1, 3, 1, 4, 5, 6, 2, 7, 4, 2, 5]
[5, 1, 7, 1, 6, 2, 5, 4, 2, 3, 7, 6, 4, 3]
[2, 3, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 1, 4, 1, 7, 6, 5, 4]
[4, 1, 7, 1, 6, 4, 2, 5, 3, 2, 7, 6, 3, 5]
[5, 2, 7, 3, 2, 6, 5, 3, 4, 1, 7, 1, 6, 4]
[3, 5, 7, 4, 3, 6, 2, 5, 4, 2, 7, 1, 6, 1]
[3, 5, 7, 2, 3, 6, 2, 5, 4, 1, 7, 1, 6, 4]
[2, 4, 7, 2, 3, 6, 4, 5, 3, 1, 7, 1, 6, 5]

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Great research. It always seems Knuth has written about everything. –  ShreevatsaR Aug 18 '10 at 13:33
    
That's wonderful, thanks a lot! –  Zoozy Aug 18 '10 at 15:56

I'm pretty sure I've seen this in Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming". I'll look it up when I get home tonight.

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Is it always possible? I can see the pattern is probable and not definite. It doesn't work for 1s or 1s and 2s.

If it is probablistic, the best idea would be to start with brute force and keep on eliminating wrong options as an when you encounter them.

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I think a good heuristic would be to start with the biggest numbers. You'll still need backtracking though.

The problem with the problem is that having a solution for n-1 usually doesn't help you much to find a solution for n.

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