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What am I doing wrong here ?

/*
 * Consider the following pseudo code !
 */
typedef struct foobar {
    unsigned char id, count;
    struct foobar *child;
} foobar;

foobar root = (foobar *) malloc( sizeof(struct foobar) );
root->child = (foobar *) malloc( sizeof(struct foobar) );

root->count++;
root->child[0].id = 1;

root->count++;
root->child[1].id = 2;

root->count++;
root->child[3].id = 3;

root->child[0].child = (foobar *) malloc( sizeof(struct foobar) );

root->child[0].child[0].count++;
root->child[0].child[0].id = 4;

root->child[1].child = (foobar *) malloc( sizeof(struct foobar) );
root->child[0].child[0].count++;
root->child[1].child[0].id = 5;

root->child[0].child[0].count++;
root->child[1].child[1].id = 6;

/* and so on */

/*
 * Function to search for an ID inside the tree,
 * it should call itself in order to go deeper into
 * the childs, but taht's not implemented here
 */
foobar *search( unsigned char id, foobar *start_node = NULL );
foobar *search( unsigned char id, foobar *start_node ) {
    if( start_node == NULL ) {
        unsigned char x;
        for( x = 0; x < root->count; x++ ) {
            if( root->child[ x ].id == id ) {
                foobar *ptr = &root->child[ x ];
                /* If I call ptr->id now, it will return the correct value */
                return &ptr;
            }
        }

    } else { /* not implemented */ }
}

/* Search the array for and ID */
foobar **ptr = this->search( 1 );
/* If I call ptr->id now, it will return memory garbage */
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5 Answers 5

root has 4 children (as you access root->child[3]), so you must allocate enough memory:

root->child = (foobar *) malloc( sizeof(struct foobar) * 4 ); //at least 4

Also, you should return the foobar pointer itself, and not a pointer to it (i.e. return ptr; instead of return &ptr;.

share|improve this answer
    
I've corrected the code and now I'm returning only "return ptr"; the memory is still garbaged. How can I return a valid pointer pointing to the memory address of root->child[ x ] so it can be used later on outside the function. The ideia is to do a search for the id and return the object that contains that id. –  Joao Aug 18 '10 at 10:04
    
Did you remember to change foobar **ptr = this->search( 1 ); to foobar *ptr = this->search( 1 ); too? –  adamk Aug 18 '10 at 10:32
    
Yes.. also did that. I'm very newb to C but if a function returns a pointer to the memory address of root->child[ x ] (root is a var at global level), the memory addr would be valid either inside or outside the function.. correct ? –  Joao Aug 18 '10 at 10:39
    
@Joao: You are correct. The code should work - try printing the value of ptr and ptr->id inside search and after it returns - it should be the same value for both printouts. –  adamk Aug 18 '10 at 10:51

You're returning the address of the pointer you've retrieved. You should be returning the pointer itself.

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You only malloc memory for one child, but try to set the id for up to 4 children.

It should be like this:

root->child = (foobar *) malloc( sizeof(struct foobar) * 4 );
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You are returning the address of a local variable from function search (return &ptr;). This object will be destroyed as soon as the search function is exited. Trying to use this memory location from outside the function will result in undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
I've corrected the code and now I'm returning only "return ptr"; the memory is still garbaged. How can I return a valid pointer pointing to the memory address of root->child[ x ] so it can be used later on outside the function. The ideia is to do a search for the id and return the object that contains that id. –  Joao Aug 18 '10 at 10:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was doing a couple things wrong.. in the code above the lines:

foobar *ptr = &root->child[ x ];
return &ptr;

Should be changed simply to return &root->child[ x ];, this will return a pointer to the memory addr of root->child[ x ].

The line foobar **ptr = this->search( 1 ); will become foobar *ptr = this->search( 1 );, this will allow to access the struct properties using the . char; -> cannot be used and will output garbage. Correct usage example: (*ptr).description.

Many thanks to adamk !

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You are mistaken - (*ptr).description is exactly the same as ptr->description. –  caf Aug 19 '10 at 1:07

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