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I want to put my JSF 2.0 xhtml files under WEB-INF\jsf. How do I access them then? I know that anything inside WEB-INF isn't exposed to the outside, so I need a controller to redirect me to the corresponding JSP, right? (This is also the model 2 pattern iirc).

Can I achieve this with a parameter inside web.xml/faces-config.xml? I think the FacesServlet is the controller of my webapp so it should serve this purpose?

And another question for understanding the Model 2 Pattern. Does every action have to go first to a servlet which then handles the next possible step? So a simple <a href="anotherPage.html" /> is forbidden in this pattern since it doesn't go to the controlling servlet?

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2 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I want to put my JSF 2.0 xhtml files under WEB-INF\jsf. How do I access them then?

You cannot. Files in /WEB-INF folder are not directly accessible.

There are two options to workaround the problem of JSF source files being public accessible.

  1. Map the FacesServlet on *.xhtml instead of *.jsf.

  2. Restrict direct access on *.xhtml by a <security-constraint> in web.xml.

    <security-constraint>
        <display-name>Restrict direct access to XHTML files</display-name>
        <web-resource-collection>
            <web-resource-name>XHTML files</web-resource-name>
            <url-pattern>*.xhtml</url-pattern>
        </web-resource-collection>
        <auth-constraint />
    </security-constraint> 
    

And another question for understanding the Model 2 Pattern. Does every action have to go first to a servlet which then handles the next possible step?

The FacesServlet already does that. It's the controller. With JSF you already end up with a simple javabean as model and JSP/Facelets file as view. The FacesServlet as being the controller has already taken all the nasty work of request parameter gathering, validation, conversion, model updating and navigation from your hands.


So a simple <a href="anotherPage.html" /> is forbidden in this pattern since it doesn't go to the controlling servlet?

No, it's perfectly fine. The controller will kick in whenever needed. If the resource doesn't need a controller (i.e. static resource), then you also don't need to let it pass through some controller.


In the future, please ask multiple questions in separate Stack Overflow questions.

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Thanks for the reply. I already mapped only *.xhtml files (option 1). I've read that in some frameworks (Struts, Spring Webflow,..) it's possible/the preferred way to put the jsp files (=dynamic content) under WEB-INF and the controller accesses them there and displays them to the user. I just wanted to ask if the same is possible with JSF. But if I see it correctly no one can view the source of the xhtml files through the browswer since they are always rendered through the controller, right? –  Tim Aug 18 '10 at 13:48
    
That's correct. –  BalusC Aug 18 '10 at 13:59
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The security constraint is only a workaround for a JSF missing. How can I map a url like home.jsf to a file different than home.xhtml put under WebContent? In this way I have high coupling beetween navigation and project structure. How can I avoid that in JSF?

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4  
This should be posted as a separate question, not an answer. –  Bill the Lizard Jan 19 '11 at 14:02
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