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I have the following classes:

class Field<T> {

  private final Class<T> type;

  public Field(Class<T> type) {
    this.type = type;
  }
}

class Pick<V> {
  private final V value;
  private final Class<V> type;

  public Pick(V value, Class<V> type) {
    this.value = value;
    this.type = type;
  }
}

and the class the question is related to:

class PickField<T> extends Field<Pick<T>> {

  public PickField(Class<Pick<T>> type) {
    super(type);
  }
}

Now this seems to be accepted by the compiler. Unfortunately I do not know/understand how I could create a new instance of PickField, e.g. for String picks.

This does - of course - not work:
new PickField<String>(Pick.class)

This is not allowed (I think I understand why):
new PickField<String>(Pick<String>.class)

So how to do it? Or does the whole approach somehow "smell"?

share|improve this question
    
What do you want to do with it? There are a couple of patterns for doing one or two specific things with T, but if you need to do a bunch of stuff where the class of T actually matters, then the code probably does smell. – Morgen Feb 1 at 15:35
up vote 15 down vote accepted

I think PickField should be parameterized with Pick instances only.

So doing this should be fine:

class PickField<T extends Pick<T>> extends Field<T> {

    public PickField(Class<T> c) {
        super(c);
    }
}

Then, you could just instantiate it with:

PickField<SomeSpecificPick> instance = new PickField<>(SomeSpecificPick.class);

where SomeSpecificPick is defined as:

public class SomeSpecificPick extends Pick<SomeSpecificPick> {

    public SomeSpecificPick(SomeSpecificPick value, Class<SomeSpecificPick> type) {
        super(value, type);
    }
}

More info (related with the topic):

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but there is an error I think inside SomeSpecificPick? If the type parameter is the class itself this will give some strange circular reference, right? – JDC Feb 1 at 14:47
    
No, there's no error. And this won't give circular references - this is the so-called self-reference type and the JDK actually defines few such, for example Integer extends Comparable<Integer>, etc. So just try the snippet out and get familiar with the links I shared. :) – Konstantin Yovkov Feb 1 at 14:52
    
Ok, seems to work after trying it out ;). One additional bonus question: what if the PickField would look like this: PickField<T extends Pick<T>> extends Field<List<T>> so that I have a list of picks? I can't manage to get the super(type) correct. – JDC Feb 2 at 15:16
1  
In such case, you will need a second type parameter. Should be something like: PickField<T extends Pick<T>, L extends List<T>> extends Field<L> – Konstantin Yovkov Feb 2 at 15:32

There are various issues here.

Firstly as you point out, you cannot obtain the class of a parametrized type at compile time, since only one class is compiled for generic types, not one per given type parameter (e.g. the Pick<String>.class idiom does not compile, and doesn't actually make sense).

Again as you mention, parametrizing the PickField<String> constructor with Pick.class only will not compile again, as the signatures aren't matched.

You could use a runtime idiom to infer the right Pick<T> parameter, but that creates another problem: due to to type erasure, your type argument for T will be unknown at runtime.

As such, you can parametrize your constructor invocation by explicitly casting, as follows:

new PickField<String>(
    (Class<Pick<String>>)new Pick<String>("", String.class).getClass()
);

... which will compile with an "unchecked cast" warning (Type safety: Unchecked cast from Class<capture#1-of ? extends Pick> to Class<Pick<String>>).

The real question is likely why do you need to know the value of type in your Pick class.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not need to know the type of the field, but the type of the pick. The field would be of type Pick<String> and the value of the Pick would be of type String. Edited the question for clarification. – JDC Feb 1 at 13:24
2  
@JDC Semantics IMO. The "smell" here as you mention it, is that you want to know the type your generic class Pick has been parametrized with, within the instance scope. This generally defiles the concept behind generics, and likely indicates a broader issue with your design. – Mena Feb 1 at 13:26

There is a way, but is not exactly a good one. You need to create a method like this:

public static <I, O extends I> O toGeneric(I input) {
    return (O) input;
}

Then, you create the object:

new PickField<String>(toGeneric(Pick.class));

Like I said, not really a good way, since you basically just lie to the compiler, but it works.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is equivalent to explicitly casting to (Class<Pick<String>>) and will generate another unchecked cast warning. No to mention the fact that, since it's presented as some general utility method, it might be misused a lot before someone starts finding bugs... – Mena Feb 1 at 13:19

In order to pass generics information as an argument, Class<T> is not enough. You need some extra power to achive that. Please see this article, where it is explained what a super type token is.

In short, if you have the following class:

public abstract class TypeToken<T> {

    protected final Type type;

    protected TypeToken() {
        Type superClass = getClass().getGenericSuperclass();
        this.type = ((ParameterizedType) superClass).getActualTypeArguments()[0];
    }

    public Type getType() {
        return this.type;
    }
}

You could use it to store generics type information, such as Pick<String>.class (which is illegal). The trick is to use the superclass' generic type information, which is accessible via the Class.getGenericSuperclass() and ParameterizedType.getActualTypeArguments() methods.

I have slightly modified your Pick, Field and PickField classes, so that they use a super type token instead of a Class<t>. Please see the modified code:

class Field<T> {

    private final TypeToken<T> type;

    public Field(TypeToken<T> type) {
        this.type = type;
    }
}

class Pick<V> {

    private final V value;

    private final TypeToken<V> type;

    public Pick(V value, TypeToken<V> type) {
        this.value = value;
        this.type = type;
    }
}

class PickField<T> extends Field<Pick<T>> {

    public PickField(TypeToken<Pick<T>> type) {
        super(type);
    }
}

And here is a sample usage:

TypeToken<Pick<String>> type = new TypeToken<Pick<String>>() {};
PickField<String> pickField = new PickField<>(type);

As TypeToken class is abstract, you need to subclass it (this explains the {} at the end of its declaration.

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