Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list and I want to remove from it the items that don't appear in another list. I've tried the following:

for w in common:
        for i in range(1,n):
            if not w in words[i]:
                common.remove(w)
However, this fails to remove some of the items. Adding print statements
for w in common:
        for i in range(1,n):
                        print w
            if not w in words[i]:
                print w
                common.remove(w)
results in some w never being printed. Any ideas as to what's happening? I assume the answer's simple and I just don't have adequate Python knowledge, but I'm completely out of ideas.

share|improve this question
    
For efficiency's sake, you should make common a set, since it is faster to check membership of a set than a list. –  katrielalex Aug 18 '10 at 15:25

5 Answers 5

I think you can simplify your statement with something like this:

filtered = filter(lambda x: x in words, common)

That's checking each element in common for it's presence in words and removing based on it. You may need to try x not in words depending on what you're desired result is, but I think that should come close.

I wanted to add one other approach, that might also come close, though I would need to see examples of your initial lists to test it fully.

filtered = [x for x in common if x in words]

-- EDITED -- I had the syntax in the list comprehension backwards, but caught it after I saw the comment. Thanks!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the pythonic solution :) –  Nicolas78 Aug 18 '10 at 15:13
2  
Good, but I would have preferred either filtered = [x for x in common if x in words] or filtered = filter(words.__contains__, common) or using operator.contains rather than the lambda in this case. Probably the first one. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Aug 18 '10 at 15:20
    
it's getting pythonicer and pythonicer ;) –  Nicolas78 Aug 18 '10 at 15:24
    
Thanks Muhammad. I thought of the list comprehension second. Appreciate the feedback though. :) –  g.d.d.c Aug 18 '10 at 15:26

You can't delete items from the list you're iterating over. Try iterating over a copy of the list instead.

for w in common[:]:
    for i in range(1,n):
        if not w in words[i]:
            common.remove(w)
share|improve this answer

From the Python docs:

It is not safe to modify the sequence being iterated over in the loop (this can only happen for mutable sequence types, such as lists). If you need to modify the list you are iterating over (for example, to duplicate selected items) you must iterate over a copy.

share|improve this answer

You are modifying the list while trying to iterate through it. You could modify the first line of the code to iterate through a copy of the list (using common[:]).

share|improve this answer

If you delete (say) item 5, then the old item 6 will now be item 5. So if you think to move to item 6 you will skip it.

Is it possible to iterate backwards over that list? Then index-changes happen in parts you already processed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.