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Is there a simple way to time the execution of a command in PowerShell, like the 'time' command in Linux?
I came up with this:

$s=Get-Date; .\do_something.ps1 ; $e=Get-Date; ($e - $s).TotalSeconds

But I would like something simpler like

time .\do_something.ps1
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5 Answers 5

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Yup.

Measure-Command { .\do_something.ps1 }

Note that one minor downside of Measure-Command is that you see no stdout output. If you want to see the output, then you can use the .NET Stopwatch object e.g.:

$sw = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
.\do_something.ps1
$sw.Stop()
$sw.Elapsed
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks! –  Paolo Tedesco Aug 18 '10 at 15:19
    
Very nice answer - can't wait to use it. I'd previously used the approach in the question, which isn't ideal. –  cristobalito Aug 18 '10 at 20:14
24  
You can also see output like this, Measure-Command {ps | Out-Default}. Or anything else that writes directly to the host, which may or may not be useful. –  JasonMArcher Aug 21 '10 at 5:23
9  
I took this solution and wrote a function that may be useful to someone else. gist.github.com/2206444 -- Example: time { ping -n 1 google.com } -Samples 10 will run the command 10 times and return the average, minimum and maximum time taken. You can add -Silent to swallow STDOUT. –  silent__thought Mar 26 '12 at 18:11
1  
My preference would be to assign the result of Measure-Command to a variable, like $t = Measure-Command {<<your command or code block>>} . Try it out and then type $t at the prompt to see your results and all the properties you have access to, like $t.Milliseconds, $t.TotalSeconds, etc. Then we can write to whatever output we want, for instance, Write-Host That command took $t.TotalSeconds to complete. –  Baodad Jan 21 at 19:49

You can also get the last command from history and subtract its EndExecutionTime from its StartExecutionTime.

.\do_something.ps1  
$command = Get-History -Count 1  
$command.EndExecutionTime - $command.StartExecutionTime
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Wow, quite surprising. I have never heard about it :) –  stej Aug 18 '10 at 20:15
10  
Try this sometime: Get-History | Group {$_.StartExecutionTime.Hour} | sort Count -desc to see your PowerShell usage pattern by hour of day. :-) –  Keith Hill Aug 18 '10 at 21:41
    
Cool... +1 from me :) –  Paolo Tedesco Aug 19 '10 at 7:51

Use Measure-Command

Example

Measure-Command { ps | Out-Host }

The pipe to Out-Host allows you to see the output of the command, which is otherwise consumed by Measure-Command.

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Simples

function time($block) {
    $sw = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
    &$block
    $sw.Stop()
    $sw.Elapsed
}

then can use as

time { .\some_command }

You may want to tweak the output

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What's about Measure-Command ? –  Kiquenet Oct 9 '13 at 9:41

Using Stopwatch and formatting elapsed time:

Function FormatElapsedTime($ts) 
{
    $elapsedTime = ""

    if ( $ts.Minutes -gt 0 )
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format( "{0:00} min. {1:00}.{2:00} sec.", $ts.Minutes, $ts.Seconds, $ts.Milliseconds / 10 );
    }
    else
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format( "{0:00}.{1:00} sec.", $ts.Seconds, $ts.Milliseconds / 10 );
    }

    if ($ts.Hours -eq 0 -and $ts.Minutes -eq 0 -and $ts.Seconds -eq 0)
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format("{0:00} ms.", $ts.Milliseconds);
    }

    if ($ts.Milliseconds -eq 0)
    {
        $elapsedTime = [string]::Format("{0} ms", $ts.TotalMilliseconds);
    }

    return $elapsedTime
}

Function StepTimeBlock($step, $block) 
{
    Write-Host "`r`n*****"
    Write-Host $step
    Write-Host "`r`n*****"

    $sw = [Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
    &$block
    $sw.Stop()
    $time = $sw.Elapsed

    $formatTime = FormatElapsedTime $time
    Write-Host "`r`n`t=====> $step took $formatTime"
}

Usage Samples

StepTimeBlock ("Publish {0} Reports" -f $Script:ArrayReportsList.Count)  { 
    $Script:ArrayReportsList | % { Publish-Report $WebServiceSSRSRDL $_ $CarpetaReports $CarpetaDataSources $Script:datasourceReport };
}

StepTimeBlock ("My Process")  {  .\do_something.ps1 }
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thanks for sharing this, this makes the job easy. –  Sudhir Kesharwani Oct 14 '13 at 13:15
    
@SudhirKesharwani Better thanks is vote updown –  Kiquenet Jul 21 at 5:27

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