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I don't know if I"m even approaching this right so bare with me. I'm newer to using Interfaces.

My intent is that any API wrapper projects we write in the future around 3rd party or even internal APIs that need a session will need to (should by expected team pattern) implement this interface because it will enforce commonality in terms of those API Wrapper projects because I know that any session classes will always have GetCurrentSession, RenewSession, etc. in them...so we have a consistent pattern in terms of common members to be implemented for concrete session classes.

So here's my interface:

/// <summary>
/// Represents an API end user based session
/// </summary>
public interface IAPISession
{
    #region Properties

    int SessionID { get; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the user ID.
    /// Note: type string since userID is not always int in 3rd party APIs 
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The user ID.</value>
    string UserID { get; }

    bool SessionHasExpired { get; }

    DateTime ExpirationDate { get; }

    void LogOut(); // expires the session & sets SessionHasExpired

    #endregion Properties

    #region Methods

    /// <summary>
    /// Renews the session by returning a brand new session 
    /// if the existing session has expired.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    IAPISession RenewSession();


    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the current API session
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    IAPISession GetCurrentSession();

    #endregion Methods
}

Here is an implementation example:

public class FacebookSession : IAPISession
{
    private static FacebookSession _singletonInstance;

    private FacebookSession() { }

    #region Properties

    private HttpContext CurrentContext { get; set; }

    private HttpCookie CurrentSessionCookie { get; set; }

    #endregion


    #region IAPISession Members

    // Checks for a current session cookie
    public bool SessionHasExpired 
    { 
        get
        {
            return _singletonInstance == null;
        }
    }

    public IAPISession RenewSession()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the current API session singleton instance
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static IAPISession GetCurrentSession()
    {
        if (SessionHasExpired)
        {
            return null;
        }

        // TODO: return the singleton instance here...

    }

    public void LogOut()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }


    public int SessionID { get; private set; }

    public string UserID { get; private set; }

    public DateTime ExpirationDate { get; private set; }

    #endregion


    public void LogIn(HttpContext currentContext)
    {
        if (SessionHasExpired)
        {
            const string redirectUri = "http://localhost/Photo/FacebookOauth.aspx"; // page they will be redirected to after they auth
            string authUrl = ConfigUtil.GetAppConfigSetting("PayPalBaseUri") + "?client_id=" +
                             ConfigUtil.GetAppConfigSetting("PayPalClientID") +
                             "&redirect_uri=" + redirectUri;

            CurrentContext.Response.Redirect(authUrl); // redirect them to log in
        }
    }
}

and here's my problem. A session is a singleton for the current user thread. To access a singleton, that method GetCurrentSession() which I know all APIs we create will need to implement (will be totally different in HOW they will be implemented based on the API) I need the property to be a static property to get the singleton.

But you can't. Because you can't have static members in an Interface. So...yea I could take out the Interface pattern requirement but I really don't want to.

FYI this is not functional code above, I'm doing my initial coding of all this and trying to design it best.

UPDATE:

On the topic of factories, let me step back to give you more context in what I'm doing here. I needed to get the right custom APIService object (I create a service class for every API wrapper to work with) based on what API wrapper I'm coding for, so I created a GetService factory (or at least attempted to..have not done a lot of factories) like below. And in it you can see that all the methods are static, properties, etc.

Usage example for below would be:

FacebookService service = PhotoServiceFactory.CurrentPhotoUploadServiceFactory;

Thoughts? I'm just trying to do the same for Session but feel I would like to actually expose the related session inside the Specific Service instance that I get back from the factory. So for instance I'd be able to do something like this:

service.CurrentSession which would give me the current facebook singleton session.

The service here is FacebookService type because the factory went out to get it based on the API type I'm working with (API type is an Enum I created that has values like Facebook, Flickr, etc.)

    public class PhotoServiceFactory
    {
        private static PhotoServiceFactory _singletonInstance;

        private PhotoServiceFactory(){}

        #region Properties

        public static PhotoUploadServiceFactory CurrentPhotoUploadServiceFactory
        {
            get
            {
                _singletonInstance = _singletonInstance ?? (_singletonInstance = new PhotoUploadServiceFactory());
                return _singletonInstance;
            } 
        }

        #endregion

        #region Methods

        public static IAPIService GetAPIService(APIType apiType)
        {
            IAPIService apiService = null;

            switch (apiType)
            {
                // return the right service singleton instance
                // based on the API type that we're working with
                case APIType.Facebook:
                    apiService = FacebookAPIService.CurrentFacebookAPIService;
                    break;
                case APIType.Flickr:
                    apiService = null; // service not implemented
                    break;
                case APIType.PhotoBucket:
                    apiService = null; // service not implemented
                    break;
                case APIType.Picasa:
                    apiService = null; // service not implemented
                    break;
                case APIType.Kodak:
                    apiService = null; // service not implemented
                    break;
            }

            return apiService;
        }

        #endregion
    }
share|improve this question
    
It's not clear to me how you want to use these classes. Could you include an example of the code which would call these static methods? Possibly in the form of a unit test? –  Douglas Aug 18 '10 at 17:47
    
sure: elbalazo.net/post/uml3.pdf. That doesn't show how you'd call the GetCurrentSession but here's how I want to call it, pretty standard: FacebookSession.GetCurrentSession(); so GetCurrentSession() is static and checking for an existing instance of FacebookSession. But again then I end up having to take the requirement to have GetCurrentSession() out of the contract if it's always needing and oging to be access statically in all future projects (Related or not) that will implement my IAPISession and it doesn't make me feel good...I feel strongly that that method needs to be there –  CoffeeAddict Aug 20 '10 at 14:46

5 Answers 5

Why do you need the property to be static to get the singleton? An instance member can get at static members with no problem - it's the other way round that's tricky.

// This should compile with no problems
public IAPISession GetCurrentSession()
{
    if (SessionHasExpired)
    {
        return null;
    }

    // TODO: return the singleton instance here...
}

If other code needs to get at the session statically, you could have another static member to do that.

Admittedly it's a bit of a design smell for an instance member to only refer to static variables (any instance of FacebookSession will effectively have the same session, if you're on the same thread) but it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
(this is my thinking currently as I work through this) In order to call GetCurrentSession I'd have to create a new instance of FacebookSession which goes against the fact that it's a singleton class and you can't create an instance of that in order to then call GetCurrentSession. So lets say somewhere in code-behind, I need to get/check for the current session because I need to use is. Well I should I think be able to just do FacebookSession.GetCurrentSession() and it will either return me the current static session or create a new one and return it... –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 16:59
    
@CoffeeAddict: You should think about using dependancy injection for giving your service its instance of the session - let the container worry about the lifecycle, not your service impl.. –  DanP Aug 18 '10 at 17:03
    
thanks Dan, have not yet gotten to IoC. Still trying to get more comfortable with Interfaces. Abstract classes are a piece of cake but incorporating interfaces and when to and opportunities to are not always clear in the beginning of a project...so I run into walls like this where my intent "might" be ok but then run into beginner walls like these. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:06
    
(Admittedly it's a bit of a design smell for an instance member to only refer to static variables) Thanks. So it's best practice not to have instance members reference static? –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:11
    
check out my updated thread above...added more context of what I'm attempting to provide and do overall outside of just the session. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:19

You could try using Extension methods for interfaces to provide a common implementation for an interface method. You could declare this extension method in the same namespace/assembly as the interface so that when someone references the interface, the extension method will be there already for them to use. In that implementation, you could use your singleton and it would be a static.

public interface IAPIWrapper
{
    string UserID { get; }
    bool SessionHasExpired { get; }
    DateTime ExpirationDate { get; }
    void LogOut(); // expires the session & sets SessionHasExpired

    IAPISession RenewSession();
    IAPISession GetCurrentSession();
}

public static class IAPIWrapperImpl
{
    private static Session session = new Session(); // Instantiate singleton here

    // This is an extension method for the IAPISession RenewSession method
    // the this keyword before the first parameter makes this an extension method
    public static IAPISession RenewSession(this IAPIWrapper wrapper)
    {
         // implementation details
         // use session here
    }

    // This is an extension method for the IAPISession GetCurrentSession method
    // the this keyword before the first parameter makes this an extension method
    public static IAPISession GetCurrentSession(this IAPIWrapper wrapper)
    {
         // implementation details
         // use session here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So, in this example, the extension method here is...? –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:23
    
I've added some comments. Please review msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx for more information on extension methods –  Dave White Aug 18 '10 at 17:30
    
thanks I know of and have actually created some extension methods in the past but just not with interfaces. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:43
    
ah! did not see the "this"...got it. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:43
    
but then like John was saying, you need to still fulfill the Interface contract by providing a non-static GetCurrentSession() method implementation...sooo? –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:45

You can convert the interface to a class, make it abstract, and make all those methods abstract too. Then you can put whatever static fields you want in that abstract base class.

share|improve this answer
    
yea but I'd prefer it to be an interface. I don't need an abstract class as all these members are going to be implemented differently anyway. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 16:55
    
Whether all the members are implemented differently is completely irrelevent to using an abstract class. –  Kirk Woll Aug 18 '10 at 19:51
    
why would an abstract class make any difference here? You still cannot add static members in an abstract class and subclasses can choose to even ignore the abstract stub if they desire unlike Interfaces (contracts) where you MUST implement that method somehow. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 20 '10 at 17:13
    
What do you mean "you still cannot add static members in an abstract class". Of course you can. But you are correct that you can't enforce any sort of contract with static methods. –  Kirk Woll Aug 20 '10 at 17:15
    
"It is an error to use the static or virtual modifiers in an abstract method declaration". msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sf985hc5%28VS.71%29.aspx –  CoffeeAddict Aug 20 '10 at 17:36

If the method is static, there's really no way to force children to implement it. If you think about how Interfaces are typically used, it makes more sense. The typical use-case is something like:

var myInterfaceInstance = new SomeClassThatImplementsInterface();
myInterfaceInstance.InterfaceMethod();

My suggestion would be to create a Factory to get the different Singleton instances of IAPISession:

public class IAPISessionFactory
{
    public static IAPISession<T> GetInstance() where T : IAPISession
    {
        if(typeof(T) == typeof(ConcreteSession)
            return ConcreteSession.GetInstance();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but the thing is, I really want that method to be in the contract...but since that method is usually going to be returning a singleton, it needs to be static. I just don't want to leave it out of the contract. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 16:57
    
(My suggestion would be to create a Factory to get the different Singleton instances of IAPISession.) actually I have a factory already. And I get the FacebookSession back from that factory...I still need to check if it's null or not (valid session or not) –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:04
2  
@CoffeeAdict - That's still the responsibility of the concrete object. The point of throwing the Factory in front of it is that we don't care how the object is constructed (or whether it's a Singleton or not) as long as it is exposed via the Factory. Therefore, you don't need the GetCurrentSession in the Interface because we don't care how the instance of IAPISession gets created as long as we get a good one back. –  Justin Niessner Aug 18 '10 at 17:11
    
check out my updated thread above...added more context of what I'm attempting to provide and do overall outside of just the session. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:20
1  
@CoffeeAddict - The point is that using a Factory hides the need for GetCurrentSession. Each object can implement its own way of getting an instance of itself. You rely on the Factory to call the correct one for you. –  Justin Niessner Aug 18 '10 at 18:30

I'm not 100% sure of what you're looking for but you can use statics with an interface. Instead using

public static IAPISession GetCurrentSession()
{
    if (SessionHasExpired)
    {
        return null;
    }

    // TODO: return the singleton instance here...

}

To meet the interface definition you would implement this privately and expose it to the interface

private static IAPISession GetTheCurrentSession()
{
    if (SessionHasExpired)
    {
        return null;
    }

    // TODO: return the singleton instance here...

}

public IAPISession GetCurrentSession()
{
return GetTheCurrentSession();
}
share|improve this answer
    
interesting...seems like a good solution to me at least... –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:02
    
This smells to me--it implies you'll need to instantiate the class to access a static method. –  STW Aug 18 '10 at 17:14
    
Yea I should not have to instantiate it to access the static method, I agree..I don't like that. –  CoffeeAddict Aug 18 '10 at 17:23
    
To access the value through the interface you have to have an instance. Whoever downvoted me clearly doesn't understand C#. –  Chris Marisic Aug 18 '10 at 20:19

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