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We are building an application which utilizes LDAP via php and I got to thinking is there anything you can do with injecting into LDAP and better yet how does one protect against LDAP injections ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When constructing LDAP filters you must ensure that filter values are handled according to RFC2254:

Any control characters with an ACII code < 32 as well as the characters with special meaning in LDAP filters "*", "(", ")", and "\" (the backslash) are converted into the representation of a backslash followed by two hex digits representing the hexadecimal value of the character.

Zend_Ldap for example uses the following routine

//[...]
$val = str_replace(array('\\', '*', '(', ')'), array('\5c', '\2a', '\28', '\29'), $val);
for ($i = 0; $i<strlen($val); $i++) {
    $char = substr($val, $i, 1);
    if (ord($char)<32) {
        $hex = dechex(ord($char));
        if (strlen($hex) == 1) $hex = '0' . $hex;
        $val = str_replace($char, '\\' . $hex, $val);
    }
}
//[...]
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How would I sanitize the password, since those specials characters are allowed ? –  Bastien974 Jan 22 '13 at 18:35

One item to consider is that an LDAP bind with a Username (DN) but no password is considered an anonymous bind. Therefore should you test to see if the passed credentials can bind via LDAP to validate the user, if they pass a blank password, and you passed it through as is, you could let someone in incorrectly.

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Thanks, this I do understand and is not really an injection. –  Chris Aug 20 '10 at 10:39
    
@Chris: Agreed, not truly an injection, but within the same basic problem space. –  geoffc Aug 20 '10 at 13:28
1  
After reading this answer, I immediately tested an app we have in development and this particular problem was not caught, thanks! –  Crazy Joe Malloy Dec 14 '11 at 17:49

In most cases it is using a read-only account for LDAP. Since LDAP is poor at writes updates only occur in very small sections of the application where another account can be used.

Even then the query language and the update language are completely separated.

To protect against displaying unwanted information treat all user input as tainted and make sure tainted data is never used before being parsed, cleaned and properly escaped and copied to a clean variable.

Similarly you might consider only picking the data you expect from the response and return that for display.

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"To protect against displaying unwanted information treat all user input as tainted and make sure tainted data is never used before being parsed, cleaned and properly escaped and copied to a clean variable." how would one go about doing this is the question ? –  Chris Aug 19 '10 at 10:49

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