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Which is the better convention of declaring pointers in C++?

MyClass* ptr

(or)

MyClass *ptr

I find the first one meaningful, because i feel like declaring MyClass pointer rather than a MyClass and specifying a type modifier. But i see a lot of books recommending the later convention. Can you give the rational behind the convention you follow?

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closed as not constructive by µBio, Andreas Brinck, ennuikiller, Amardeep AC9MF, Henk Holterman Aug 18 '10 at 18:47

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It doesn't matter. Use what your team uses. If you are working alone, use what you like. – µBio Aug 18 '10 at 18:46
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The real question is whether to use K & R style braces or not... – Andreas Brinck Aug 18 '10 at 18:47
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What Stroustrup has to say: www2.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html#whitespace – Michael Burr Aug 18 '10 at 18:51
    
This should have been closed as a duplicate, not as subjective and argumentative. – sbi Aug 18 '10 at 18:56

The rational behind the convention MyClass *ptr is that the * belongs to a single variable, so if you have:

MyClass *ptr1, ptr2

This declares ptr2 as a MyClass, not a MyClass*.

Barring the use of this horribly confusing type of declaration, it is a matter of style.

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