Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Accuracy Vs. Precision

What I would like to know is whether I should use System.currentTimeMillis() or System.nanoTime() when updating my object's positions in my game? Their change in movement is directly proportional to the elapsed time since the last call and I want to be as precise as possible.

I've read that there are some serious time-resolution issues between different operating systems (namely that Mac / Linux have an almost 1 ms resolution while Windows has a 50ms resolution??). I'm primarly running my apps on windows and 50ms resolution seems pretty inaccurate.

Are there better options than the two I listed?

Any suggestions / comments?

share|improve this question
    
Better yet would be to just try both in your game on a variety of platforms. –  erjiang Nov 4 '10 at 2:56
25  
nanoTime is significantly usually more accurate than currentTimeMillis but it's a relatively expensive call as well.currentTimeMillis() runs in a few (5-6) cpu clocks, nanoTime depends on the underlying architecture and can be 100+ cpu clocks. –  bestsss Feb 21 '11 at 1:15
2  
You do all realise that Windows generally has a timeslice granularity of 1000ms / 64, right? Which is 15.625ms, or 15625000nanoseconds! –  user968961 Sep 28 '11 at 11:30
3  
I don't think a hundred extra clock cycles are going to impact your game, and the trade off would probably be worth it. You should only be calling the method once per game update then saving the value in mem, so it won't add a lot of overhead. As for the granularity of different platforms, I have no idea. –  aglassman Jun 13 '12 at 15:58
2  
Windows has a DEFAULT timeslice granularity of 1000ms/64. You can increase this through the native timeBeginPeriod API. Modern PCs also have high-resolution timers in addition to the basic timer. High-resolution timers are accessible via the QueryPerformanceCounter call. –  Robin Davies Jan 16 '13 at 8:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 115 down vote accepted

If you're just looking for extremely precise measurements of elapsed time, use System.nanoTime(). System.currentTimeMillis() will give you the most accurate possible elapsed time in milliseconds since the epoch, but System.nanoTime() gives you a nanosecond-precise time, relative to some arbitrary point.

From the Java Documentation:

public static long nanoTime()

Returns the current value of the most precise available system timer, in nanoseconds.

This method can only be used to measure elapsed time and is not related to any other notion of system or wall-clock time. The value returned represents nanoseconds since some fixed but arbitrary time (perhaps in the future, so values may be negative). This method provides nanosecond precision, but not necessarily nanosecond accuracy. No guarantees are made about how frequently values change. Differences in successive calls that span greater than approximately 292 years (263 nanoseconds) will not accurately compute elapsed time due to numerical overflow.

For example, to measure how long some code takes to execute:

long startTime = System.nanoTime();    
// ... the code being measured ...    
long estimatedTime = System.nanoTime() - startTime;

See also: JavaDoc System.nanoTime() and JavaDoc System.currentTimeMillis() for more info.

share|improve this answer
11  
Are you sure you know the difference between accuracy and precision? There is no way it is accurate to a nanosecond precision. –  Simucal Dec 9 '08 at 2:09
2  
Sorry, I meant precise. I was using the term loosely, but I agree it was confusing (and an improper use of the word). –  dancavallaro Dec 9 '08 at 2:10
    
And since you want elapsed time, you don't care about accuracy, you care about precision. System.nanoTime() will give you the most precise time interval possible. –  dancavallaro Dec 9 '08 at 2:11
4  
@dancavallaro, thanks for the information. If you don't mind, I edited your answer to include a quote from the docs and fixed up the links –  Simucal Dec 9 '08 at 2:28
27  
This answer is technically correct in choosing nanoTime() but completely glosses over an extremely important point. nanoTime(), as the doc says, is a precision timer. currentTimeMillis() is NOT A TIMER, it is the "wall clock". nanoTime() will always produce positive elapsed time, currentTimeMillis will not (e.g. if you change the date, hit a leap second, etc.) This is an extremely important distinction for some types of systems. –  charstar Apr 10 '11 at 10:32

David Holmes of Sun posted a blog article a couple years ago that has a very detailed look at the Java timing APIs (in particular System.currentTimeMillis() and System.nanoTime()), when you would want to use which, and how they work internally.

Inside the Hotspot VM: Clocks, Timers and Scheduling Events - Part I - Windows

One very interesting aspect of the timer used by Java on Windows for APIs that have a timed wait parameter is that the resolution of the timer can change depending on what other API calls may have been made - system wide (not just in the particular process). He shows an example where using Thread.sleep() will cause this resolution change.

share|improve this answer
2  
    
@Justin: thanks –  Michael Burr Feb 15 '12 at 21:39

System.nanoTime() isn't supported in older JVMs. If that is a concern, stick with currentTimeMillis

Regarding accuracy, you are almost correct. On SOME Windows machines, currentTimeMillis() has a resolution of about 10ms (not 50ms). I'm not sure why, but some Windows machines are just as accurate as linux machines.

I have used GAGETimer in the past with moderate success.

share|improve this answer
    
If you have used GAGE, would you mind answering this question on Java 2D Frameworks? stackoverflow.com/questions/293079/java-2d-game-frameworks –  Lawrence Dol Dec 9 '08 at 2:22
1  
I posted an answer on your thread. –  Paul Morel Dec 9 '08 at 4:04

Since none else has mentioned this, it is not safe to compare the results of System.nanoTime() calls between different Threads. Even if the events of the Threads happen in a predictable order, the difference in nanoseconds can be positive or negative.

System.currentTimeMillis() is safe for use between threads.

share|improve this answer
1  
On Windows that only holds until SP2 according to: stackoverflow.com/questions/510462/… –  Peter Schmitz Feb 22 '12 at 11:25
    
Well, you learn something new every day. I suspect, though, that given it was unsafe in the past (definitely returns nonsense readings across threads), such usage is probably still outside the spec and so should probably be avoided. –  jgubby Mar 4 '12 at 14:55
    
@jgubby: Very interesting... any reference to support that is not safe to compare the results of System.nanoTime() calls between different Threads? The following links are worth to see: bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6519418 docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… –  user454322 Oct 9 '12 at 10:45

As others have said, currentTimeMillis is clock time, which changes due to daylight saving time, users changing the time settings, leap seconds, and internet time sync. If your app depends on monotonically increasing elapsed time values, you might prefer nanoTime instead.

You might think that the players won't be fiddling with the time settings during game play, and maybe you'd be right. But don't underestimate the disruption due to internet time sync, or perhaps remote desktop users. The nanoTime API is immune to this kind of disruption.

If you want to use clock time, but avoid discontinuities due to internet time sync, you might consider an NTP client such as Meinberg, which "tunes" the clock rate to zero it in, instead of just resetting the clock periodically.

I speak from personal experience. In a weather application that I developed, I was getting randomly occurring wind speed spikes. It took a while for me to realize that my timebase was being disrupted by the behavior of clock time on a typical PC. All my problems disappeared when I started using nanoTime. Consistency (monotonicity) was more important to my application than raw precision or absolute accuracy.

share|improve this answer

Yes, if such precision is required use System.nanoTime(), but be aware that you are then requiring a Java 5+ JVM.

On my XP systems, I see system time reported to at least 100 microseconds 278 nanoseconds using the following code:

private void test() {
    System.out.println("currentTimeMillis: "+System.currentTimeMillis());
    System.out.println("nanoTime         : "+System.nanoTime());
    System.out.println();

    testNano(false);                                                            // to sync with currentTimeMillis() timer tick
    for(int xa=0; xa<10; xa++) {
        testNano(true);
        }
    }

private void testNano(boolean shw) {
    long strMS=System.currentTimeMillis();
    long strNS=System.nanoTime();
    long curMS;
    while((curMS=System.currentTimeMillis()) == strMS) {
        if(shw) { System.out.println("Nano: "+(System.nanoTime()-strNS)); }
        }
    if(shw) { System.out.println("Nano: "+(System.nanoTime()-strNS)+", Milli: "+(curMS-strMS)); }
    }
share|improve this answer

I've had good experience with nanotime. It provides wall-clock time as two longs (seconds since the epoch and nanoseconds within that second), using a JNI library. It's available with the JNI part precompiled for both Windows and Linux.

share|improve this answer

one thing here is the inconsistency of the nanoTime method.it does not give very consistent values for the same input.currentTimeMillis does much better in terms of performance and consistency,and also ,though not as precise as nanoTime,has a lower margin of error,and therefore more accuracy in its value. i would therefore suggest that you use currentTimeMillis

share|improve this answer
    
As noted in other answers and comments, currentTimeMillis is subject to system clock changes and therefore a poor choice for calculating elapsed time since some earlier event in the JVM. –  duelin markers Oct 14 '13 at 19:00

protected by Elenasys Jan 3 at 17:50

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.