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I am trying to parse out some information from Google's geocoding API but I am having a little trouble with efficiently getting the data out of the xml. See link for example

All I really care about is getting the short_name from address_component where the type is administrative_area_level_1 and the long_name from administrative_area_level_2 However with my test program my XPath query returns no results for both queries.

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    using(WebClient webclient = new WebClient())
    {
        webclient.Proxy = null;
        string locationXml = webclient.DownloadString("http://maps.google.com/maps/api/geocode/xml?address=1600+Amphitheatre+Parkway,+Mountain+View,+CA&sensor=false");
        using(var reader = new StringReader(locationXml))
        {
            var doc = new XPathDocument(reader);
            var nav = doc.CreateNavigator();
            Console.WriteLine(nav.SelectSingleNode("/GeocodeResponse/result/address_component[type=administrative_area_level_1]/short_name").InnerXml);
            Console.WriteLine(nav.SelectSingleNode("/GeocodeResponse/result/address_component[type=administrative_area_level_2]/long_name").InnerXml);

        }
    }
}

Can anyone help me find what I am doing wrong, or recommending a better way?

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to put the value of the node you're looking for in quotes:

".../address_component[type='administrative_area_level_1']/short_name"
                            ↑                           ↑
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1  
Yeah. One of the hardest things about getting started with XPath is that it doesn't give errors for nonsense strings that could conceivably be element names but aren't meant to be. You get no warning of what you did wrong; you just get no nodes selected. –  LarsH Aug 18 '10 at 21:01
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I'd definitely recommend using LINQ to XML instead of XPathNavigator. It makes XML querying a breeze, in my experience. In this case I'm not sure exactly what's wrong... but I'll come up with a LINQ to XML snippet instead.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Xml.Linq;

class Test
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using(WebClient webclient = new WebClient())
        {
            webclient.Proxy = null;
            string locationXml = webclient.DownloadString
                ("http://maps.google.com/maps/api/geocode/xml?address=1600"
                 + "+Amphitheatre+Parkway,+Mountain+View,+CA&sensor=false");
            XElement root = XElement.Parse(locationXml);

            XElement result = root.Element("result");
            Console.WriteLine(result.Elements("address_component")
                                    .Where(x => (string) x.Element("type") ==
                                           "administrative_area_level_1")
                                    .Select(x => x.Element("short_name").Value)
                                    .First());
            Console.WriteLine(result.Elements("address_component")
                                    .Where(x => (string) x.Element("type") ==
                                           "administrative_area_level_2")
                                    .Select(x => x.Element("long_name").Value)
                                    .First());
        }
    }
}

Now this is more code1... but I personally find it easier to get right than XPath, because the compiler is helping me more.

EDIT: I feel it's worth going into a little more detail about why I generally prefer code like this over using XPath, even though it's clearly longer.

When you use XPath within a C# program, you have two different languages - but only one is in control (C#). XPath is relegated to the realm of strings: Visual Studio doesn't give an XPath expression any special handling; it doesn't understand that it's meant to be an XPath expression, so it can't help you. It's not that Visual Studio doesn't know about XPath; as Dimitre points out, it's perfectly capable of spotting errors if you're editing an XSLT file, just not a C# file.

This is the case whenever you have one language embedded within another and the tool is unaware of it. Common examples are:

  • SQL
  • Regular expressions
  • HTML
  • XPath

When code is presented as data within another language, the secondary language loses a lot of its tooling benefits.

While you can context switch all over the place, pulling out the XPath (or SQL, or regular expressions etc) into their own tooling (possibly within the same actual program, but in a separate file or window) I find this makes for harder-to-read code in the long run. If code were only ever written and never read afterwards, that might be okay - but you do need to be able to read code afterwards, and I personally believe the readability suffers when this happens.

The LINQ to XML version above only ever uses strings for pure data - the names of elements etc - and uses code (method calls) to represent actions such as "find elements with a given name" or "apply this filter". That's more idiomatic C# code, in my view.

Obviously others don't share this viewpoint, but I thought it worth expanding on to show where I'm coming from.

Note that this isn't a hard and fast rule of course... in some cases XPath, regular expressions etc are the best solution. In this case, I'd prefer the LINQ to XML, that's all.


1 Of course I could have kept each Console.WriteLine call on a single line, but I don't like posting code with horizontal scrollbars on SO. Note that writing the correct XPath version with the same indentation as the above and avoiding scrolling is still pretty nasty:

            Console.WriteLine(nav.SelectSingleNode("/GeocodeResponse/result/" +
                "address_component[type='administrative_area_level_1']" +
                "/short_name").InnerXml);

In general, long lines work a lot better in Visual Studio than they do on Stack Overflow...

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1  
@Jon Skeet: I don't think that it's a good practice to recommend LINQ when someone ask for a specific XPath expression. Plus I don't see how "compiler helping" (?!) makes this Console.WriteLine(result.Elements("address_component").Where(x => (string) x.Element("type") == "administrative_area_level_2").Select(x => x.Element("long_name").Value).First()); better than Console.WriteLine(nav.SelectSingleNode("/GeocodeResponse/result/address_compone‌​nt[type='administrative_area_level_1']/short_name").InnerXml); –  user357812 Aug 18 '10 at 20:18
2  
@Dimitre: For someone whose primary tags are xml, xslt and xpath, I'm not surprised you'd prefer the XPath version. For someone who already knows LINQ but isn't as comfortable with the XPath, the LINQ version can be a lot easier to understand and extend. Don't assume everyone has your XPath knowledge/comfort. –  Jon Skeet Aug 18 '10 at 20:49
2  
@Dimitre: I don't see why that has a large cyclomatic complexity. Where do you see that coming in? I still think you're massively biased towards the XPath solution because you're so familiar with it. Undoubtedly I'm biased towards LINQ solutions because I'm familiar with that too... but what's wrong with showing options? Note the OP's comment: " I would love a example of linq to xml if you could provide one." –  Jon Skeet Aug 18 '10 at 21:10
2  
@Dimitre: I would still rather read code which made the difference clearer. I'm not a fan of embedding SQL in code either, for much the same reason. I think it's perfectly reasonable for us each to have our own preferences here, but I do wish you'd express yours less agressively. –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '10 at 20:33
2  
@Dimitre: How should I not feel it's aggressive when you say you'd like to take away 1000 rep, you question whether I've heard of cyclomatic complexity, things like "I at least am not teaching you what LINQ is or isn't" and "What an ugly code!" etc. Maybe you deem all of those as polite, but I certainly don't. –  Jon Skeet Aug 20 '10 at 6:14
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I would recommend just typing the XPath expression as part of an XSLT file in Visual Studio. You'll get error messages "as you type" -- this is an excellent XML/XSLT/XPath editor.

For example, I am typing:

<xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node() x"/>

and immediately get in the Error List window the following error:

Error   9   Expected end of the expression, found 'x'.  @* | node()  -->x<--

XSLTFile1.xslt  9   14  Miscellaneous Files

Only when the XPath expression does not raise any errors (I might also test that it selects the intended nodes, too), would I put this expression into my C# code.

This ensures that I will have no XPath -- syntax and semantic -- errors when I run the C# program.

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It's good that Visual Studio provides this feedback. It's bad that you have to create an XSLT file (including bits that won't be in the final XPath) in order to get any feedback. It would be nice if Visual Studio recognised methods which took XPath expressions and could apply some intelligence to those, but that's a bit of a fond dream, I suspect. This is always the problem I have when we embed one language within another, whether it's XPath, HTML, SQL, regular expressions, even simple formatting strings. That's why I tend to prefer solutions which stick to a single source language. –  Jon Skeet Aug 20 '10 at 6:16
    
@Jon-Skeet So everything is a hammer? :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 20 '10 at 13:43
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dtb's response is accurate. I wanted to add that you can use xpath testing tools like the link below to help find the correct xpath:

http://www.bit-101.com/xpath/

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string url = @"http://maps.google.com/maps/api/geocode/xml?address=1600+Amphitheatre+Parkway,+Mountain+View,+CA&sensor=false";
string value = "administrative_area_level_1";

using(WebClient client = new WebClient())
{
    string wcResult = client.DownloadString(url);

    XDocument xDoc = XDocument.Parse(wcResult);

    var result = xDoc.Descendants("address_component")
                    .Where(p=>p.Descendants("type")
                                .Any(q=>q.Value.Contains(value))
                    );

}

The result is an enumeration of "address_component"s that have at least one "type" node that has contains the value you're searching for. The result of the query above is an XElement that contains the following data.

<address_component>
  <long_name>California</long_name>
  <short_name>CA</short_name>
  <type>administrative_area_level_1</type>
  <type>political</type>
</address_component> 

I would really recommend spending a little time learning LINQ in general because its very useful for manipulating and querying in-memory objects, querying databases and tends to be easier than using XPath when working with XML. My favorite site to reference is http://www.hookedonlinq.com/

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