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I'd like to be able to enter an interactive session, preferably with IPython, if a unit test fails. Is there an easy way to do this?

edit: by "interactive session" I mean a full Python REPL rather than a pdb shell.

edit edit: As a further explanation: I'd like to be able to start an interactive session that has access to the context in which the test failure occurred. So for example, the test's self variable would be available.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In IPython, use %pdb before running the test

In [9]: %pdb
Automatic pdb calling has been turned ON
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Hmm... that's about halfway there. Well, maybe. I actually want to be in an interactive shell, not so much in pdb. –  intuited Aug 19 '10 at 1:24
    
I'm not sure why you want to do this. But once in pdb, just enter q will get you back to the interactive shell. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 19 '10 at 14:06
    
Hmmm... not exactly. Entering q will exit the debug context entirely. I want to run a shell from within the debug context. For example, self should be defined. –  intuited Aug 19 '10 at 15:20
    
Nevermind, I didn't realize that pdb just layers shortcut commands on top of a full REPL. This is what I want. –  intuited Aug 31 '10 at 22:25
    
I dont understand how to use this solution. i have a unittest.TestCase class. how can run the test, so that ipython is activated upon a test failure? –  alex Jun 7 '13 at 15:35

Nosetests runner provides --pdb option that will put you into the debugger session on errors or failures.

http://nose.readthedocs.org/en/latest/usage.html

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Are you really sure you want to do this? Your unit tests should do one thing, should be well-named, and should clearly print what failed. If you do all of that, the failure message will pinpoint what went wrong; no need to go look at it interactively. In fact, one of the big advantages of TDD is that it helps you avoid having to go into the debugger at all to diagnose problems.

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+1: Please don't "automate" debugging. When the test fails, that's enough. An interactive session may not be the right thing to do. Entering into a text editor may be a bette choice. Or entering an an automated order for pizza because it will be a long night may be better than an interactive session. –  S.Lott Aug 19 '10 at 0:15
    
I guess you're saying I should write more tests to automatically do the stuff that I would do from the interactive shell. Seems like generally good advice, but there may be cases where it's helpful to do some exploring in order to figure out what the test needs to be. –  intuited Aug 19 '10 at 1:26
    
@intuited: Exploring is very good. Automating testing to "magically" switch between testing and interactive session is a bad idea. Too much automation is rarely useful. –  S.Lott Aug 19 '10 at 2:58
    
@S.Lott: The idea is to be able to run a particular test in such a way that an interactive session gets started in place of the failed assertion. That way when there is a case where the test doesn't make it immediately obvious what's wrong, it's convenient to jump into an environment well suited to digging around looking for the problem. –  intuited Aug 19 '10 at 3:23
    
@intuited: An interactive session may not be the right thing to do. Entering into a text editor may be a bette choice. Or entering an an automated order for pizza because it will be a long night may be better than an interactive session. Don't waste time trying to automate this. It's just debugging. You're writing code to save two mouse clicks. –  S.Lott Aug 19 '10 at 10:09

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