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I hope someone might be able to answer why the following doesn't work. Bear with me though, I am still very much a noob... I just cannot get to the bottom of why the following

using namespace std;
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class testClass
{
public:
 operator char* () {return (char*)"hi";};
 operator int ()  {return 77;};
 operator std::string  () {return "hello";};
};

int main()
{
 char* c;
 int i;
 std::string s = "goodday";

 testClass t;

 c = t;
 i = t;
 s = t;

 cout<< "char: " << c << " int: " << i << " string: "<<s<<endl;

 return 0;
}

gives me a compile time error:

myMain.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
myMain.cpp:23: error: ambiguous overload for ‘operator=’ in ‘s = t’
/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/basic_string.h:500: note: candidates are: std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>& std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::operator=(const std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/basic_string.h:508: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>& std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::operator=(const _CharT*) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/basic_string.h:519: note:                 std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>& std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::operator=(_CharT) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>]

If I do not attempt the assignment

s = t;

it does work.

I've been trying for hours to even comprehend the error message, but what's puzzling me most is that is does work for char*.

I'm grateful for any hint. Thanks! Markus

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5 Answers 5

$13.3.1.5/2 states- "The conversion functions of S and its base classes are considered. Those that are not hidden within S and yield type T or a type that can be converted to type T via a standard conversion sequence (13.3.3.1.1) are candidate functions. Conversion functions that return a cv-qualified type are considered to yield the cv-unqualified version of that type for this process of selecting candidate functions. Conversion functions that return “reference to cv2 X” return lvalues of type “cv2 X” and are therefore considered to yield X for this process of selecting candidate functions."

The assignment s = t works as follows:

a) All members in the type of 't' (testClass) are considered which can convert 't' to 's'.

Candidate 1: operator string();   // s created using member string::operator=(string const&)
Candidate 2: operator char *()    // s created using member string::operator=(char const*)
Candidate 3: operator char *()    // s created using member string::operator=(char *)

b) All of the above candidates are viable (that is, in absence of other candidates, the compiler can successfully resolve the function call to either of them)

c) However, now the best viable candidate has to be determined. The Conversion sequences involved are:

Candidate 1: U1 : operator string()
Candidate 2: U2 : operator char*()->const qualification to match string::operator=(char const*)
Candidate 3: U3 : operator char*()

$13.3.3.1.1/3 states - "The rank of a conversion sequence is determined by considering the rank of each conversion in the sequence and the rank of any reference binding (13.3.3.1.4). If any of those has Conversion rank, the sequence has Conversion rank;"

This means that U1, U2 and U3 are all having Conversion rank and at a first level neither s better than the other. However, the standard also states

User-defined conversion sequence U1 is a better conversion sequence than another user-defined conversion sequence U2 if they contain the same user-defined conversion function or constructor and if the second standard conversion sequence of U1 is better than the second standard conversion sequence of U2.

So, let's see what this means.

Between U1 and U2, they involve, different conversion functions and hence none is better than the other

Between U1 and U3, they involve, different conversion functions and hence none is better than the other

So what about U1 and U2. They involve the same conversion function, which satisfies the first part of the "and" condition above

So what about the part "and if the second standard conversion sequence of U1 is better than the second standard conversion sequence of U2."

In U2, the second standard conversion sequence requires a const qualification, where in U3 this is not required. The second standard conversion sequence of U3 is an Exact Match.

But as Table 9 in the Standard states, CV qualification is also considered to be an Exact Match.

Therefore U2 and U3 are also really indistinguisable as far as overload resolution is considered.

This means U1, U2 and U3 are all really as good as each other and the compiler finds resolving the call(as part of assignment statement) as ambiguous, as there is no unambiguous best viable function

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friends, am having difficulty in formatting step (c) in block quotes. Need help. –  Chubsdad Aug 19 '10 at 3:29
    
You need an extra newline. –  greyfade Aug 19 '10 at 4:19
    
@greyfade: Thanks buddy –  Chubsdad Aug 19 '10 at 4:26

What the error is trying to explain is that your assignment "s = t", where s is a std::string, would be valid if t were a std::string too, or if t were a [const] char*. Your conversion operators can convert a t into either, so the compiler has no basis on which to choose one over the other....

You can disambiguate this explicitly by selecting the conversion you want:

s = t.operator std::string();
s = static_cast<std::string>(t);

Or you can provide only one of the conversions and let the user do a further conversion when necessary.

You may find though - in the end - that any conversion operator is more trouble than it's worth... it's telling that std::string itself doesn't provide a conversion operator to const char*.

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But it doesn't compile even if I take variable c and the char* operator out of the equation. I am trying to avoid explicit disambiguation by the user of class testClass in an attempt to get around the inability to overload member functions differing in return value. –  Markus Aug 19 '10 at 2:22
1  
As per the error message, the third std::string assignment operator involved in the ambiguity is from type "char"... unfortunately your test class has an implicit conversion to int, and char is just a (typically) 8-bit int.... I sympathise with your aim... it would be great if a good solution existed - imagine not having to call std::string::c_str() so often - but unfortunately the available approaches have issues. Maybe C++ should support a notation to disambiguate such situations - when the programmer is confident that all the matches are functionally equivalent - but for now... :-(. –  Tony D Aug 19 '10 at 2:42
    
"Functionally equivalent" doesn't mean equivalent though. Constructing/assigning a string with const std::string& is likely to be more efficient than const char* (with GCC libstdc++, it shares the buffer and does copy-on-write, I think), even if they otherwise appear to do the same thing. –  tc. Aug 19 '10 at 13:57
    
Quite true. Similarly, std::string::size() is O(1) vs strlen() being O(n). So, say you've got overloaded fn(const std::string&) and fn(const char*), if you could indicate a preference for the former that would specify which of the argument's conversion operators to use, the callee would simply being making the optimal choice once, rather than the callers having to do it at every call site, possibly without knowledge of fn() implementation and which overload call is preferable. –  Tony D Aug 20 '10 at 3:37

There's no exact std::string::operator=. The candidates are, paraphrased,

s = (const std::string)(std::string)t;
s = (const char*)t;
s = (char)(int)t;

I think things will work if you change it to return const std::string. (EDIT: I'm wrong.) Also note that the first function should return const char *. If you need to cast a string literal to char*, you're doing something wrong; string literals are not writeable.

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Just tried that and it doesn't seem to work. And thanks for the hint. I am aware that I need to think and learn some more about when things are or should be const... –  Markus Aug 19 '10 at 2:22
    
There's nothing wrong with operator std::string()... it constructs a std::string temporary from the string literal that's then "owned" by the caller, so any non-const operation thereon doesn't affect the string literal itself. But it should definitely be operator const char*() for the first one. –  Tony D Aug 19 '10 at 2:49
    
Obviously my C++-Fu isn't up to scratch. It must pick both a cast and an assignment operator, and there's no reason for it to prefer operator=(const std::string&) to operator=(const char*). I'm not sure if you can define global assignment operators (i.e. ::operator=(std::string&,const testClass&), but if it works, that might be a solution.) –  tc. Aug 19 '10 at 13:51

Actually, it's because std::string offers an assignment operator that takes a const char*.

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1  
So that means that std::string operator= () and my testClass::operator std::string () are competing for the job? –  Markus Aug 19 '10 at 2:23
1  
@Markus: As others were kind enough to explain, the assignment operator is overloaded and can handle more than one of the types that your class has an implicit conversion for. –  Steven Sudit Aug 19 '10 at 2:41

Alright, thanks a lot already everyone. I think I am starting to get the hang of it, kind of...

First of all I wasn't aware of the fact, that char is just an 8-bit int. Thanks for that clarification.

So I understand that, because there are three assignment operators defined for std::string, each with different argument (string, char*, const char*) the right-hand-side of my expression

s=t

doesn't know, which type is has to convert into, since there are multiple, potentially matching (for this assignment to std::string) conversions defined with either

operator int ()  {return 77;};
operator std::string  () {return "hello";};

(since char : 8bit int)

or

operator char* () {return (char*)"hi";};
operator std::string  () {return "hello";};

Is that right? So in idiots terms, the left-hand-side of the assignment isn't telling the right-hand-side which type it expects, so rhs has to choose from its options, where one is as good as some other? std::string operator= is being to tolerant for my intents?

So far so good, I thought I got it - but then, why does the following create ambiguity as well?

 using namespace std;
 #include <string>
 #include <iostream>

 class testClass
  {
   public:
     operator float ()  {return float(77.333);};
     operator std::string  () {return "hello";};
  };

  int main()
  {
    std::string s = "goodday";
    testClass t;

    s = t;

    cout<< " string: "<<s <<endl;

    return 0;
  }

Now there is only one matching conversion operator defined by me, right? std::string operator= cannot take floats, or can it? Or is float in some way equivalent to some variant of char again?

I understand the code as 's=' telling the rhs: "give me a string, char* or const char*"

Rhs checks what it can provide given an instance of testClass, and the only match is testClass::operator std::string

Again, thanks for your patience, expertise and time guys - I really appreciate it.

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That's because a 'float' can be converted to 'char' as part of the floating-integral Standard Conversion Sequence. If you have difficulty in understanding compiler messages, one way to learn the concept is to comment out "operator string()" and check what happens in the code. VS gives "warning C4244: 'argument' : conversion from 'float' to 'char', possible loss of data". This means that operator float() is a candidate and the match to call this operator requires conversion from float to char –  Chubsdad Aug 19 '10 at 5:47
    
Ok, so there's still a lot I have to learn. Thanks again everyone! I guess my, what I thought of as an elegant solution doesn't work after all... –  Markus Aug 19 '10 at 16:34

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