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I have a component that sends messages to a queue to be handled by another system. It should also publish a topic about job statuses every once in a while. Can I just use the same JmsTemplate used to send to a queue AND to publish to a topic?

I created a new topic in ActiveMQ, except that when I send from JmsTemplate a message, a new queue with the topic name gets created with the sent message (instead of sending the data to the actual topic), what am I doing wrong here?

here's my config:

<bean id="connectionFactory" class="org.springframework.jms.connection.CachingConnectionFactory">
    <constructor-arg ref="amqConnectionFactory" />
    <property name="exceptionListener" ref="jmsExceptionListener" />
    <property name="sessionCacheSize" value="100" />
</bean>

<!--  JmsTemplate Definition -->
<bean id="jmsTemplate" class="org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate">
    <constructor-arg ref="connectionFactory" />
</bean>


<bean id="messageFacade" class="org.foo.MessageFacadeJms">
    <property name="jmsTemplate" ref="jmsTemplate" />
</bean>

MessageFacadeJms is the class I use to send a queue message (and it works), can I also just used that to publish a topic?

Can I just use this to do both queue sending and topic publishing?:

jmsTemplate.convertAndSend("TOPIC_NAME" /* or queue name */, message);
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up vote 17 down vote accepted

This might seem a bit odd, you need to tell JmsTemplate that it's a topic rather than a queue, by setting its pubSubDomain property to true.

That means you're going to need two JmsTemplate beans, one for the queue, and one for the topic:

<bean id="jmsQueueTemplate" class="org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate">
   <constructor-arg ref="connectionFactory" />
   <property name="pubSubDomain" value="false"/>
</bean>

<bean id="jmsTopicTemplate" class="org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate">
   <constructor-arg ref="connectionFactory" />
   <property name="pubSubDomain" value="true"/>
</bean>
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If you create the destination as a spring bean rather than using the destination name in your code, Spring won't need to know whether it is a topic or a queue. Else the solution suggested above should work as well.

AMQ JMS destinations can be created by directly instantiating them:

  <bean id="destination" class="org.apache.activemq.command.ActiveMQTopic">
    <constructor-arg value="TOPIC_NAME" />
  </bean>

or fetching from JNDI:

<bean id="topic" class="org.springframework.jndi.JndiObjectFactoryBean">
        <property name="jndiName" value="TOPIC_NAME"/>
        <property name="jndiTemplate" ref="jmsJndiTemplate"/> 
</bean>

I prefer the JNDI technique as it is more standard.

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For others who may need more information, here is some more detail on using Spring to send JMS messages.

Bruce

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If it's ok for you to use a naming convention for queue/topics, then you can implement a custom org.springframework.jms.support.destination.DestinationResolver

public class NamingDestinationResolver implements DestinationResolver {
   public Destination resolveDestinationName(Session session, String destinationName, boolean pubSubDomain) throws JMSException {
      if (destinationName.endsWith("Queue")) {
         return session.createQueue(destinationName);
      } else if (destinationName.endsWith("Topic")) {
         return session.createTopic(destinationName);
      }
      throw new RuntimeException("Naming convention not respected for destination " + destinationName);
   }
}

and reference it using JmsTemplate.setDestinationResolver

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