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I have a data frame that I am outputting to MS Word. Lets say I'm trying to output the data frame mtcars, then using the R2wd package, I get:

#install.packages("R2wd")
require(R2wd)
wdGet()
wdTable(mtcars)

'>ncol(mtcars)
11

however a count shows that there are actually 12 columns. R doesn't include the model of car.

I have a dataframe that's outputting the numeric sequence of a dataframe and I really need that suppressed. In the report I'm outputting to it's useless information. So I basically need to suppress the model column of mtcars.

Also, how is it that they can get the car names to be the "hidden" column?

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The "extra column" is the row names. Try row.names(mtcars). Beyond that, your question isn't very clear. Can you give an example of your data.frame, the output you are getting, and what you are desiring. –  kmm Aug 19 '10 at 3:12
1  
After reading your question again, it appears that you have two options at your disposal to "suppress" the offending column. 1. Set your first column as the row.names for the data frame (best solution). 2. Subset the data.frame you are printing or passing into the R2wd command with something like my.df[ , -1]. Without seeing some sample data or exactly what's wrong with the output, it's hard to give any more advice. –  Chase Aug 19 '10 at 3:34
    
I was able to fix it using: LQI is a spreadsheet, X is another dataframe > W<-data.frame(Desc=LQI$Description[X$clusterNumber==i], row.names = X$Loc[X$clusterNumber==i]) thank you! –  Zach Folwick Aug 19 '10 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

All data.frame objects have rowname attributes. You're confusing the rowname for an actual column.

> str(mtcars)
'data.frame':   32 obs. of  11 variables:
 $ mpg : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 ...
 $ cyl : num  6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 ...
 $ disp: num  160 160 108 258 360 ...
 $ hp  : num  110 110 93 110 175 105 245 62 95 123 ...
 $ drat: num  3.9 3.9 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 ...
 $ wt  : num  2.62 2.88 2.32 3.21 3.44 ...
 $ qsec: num  16.5 17 18.6 19.4 17 ...
 $ vs  : num  0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 ...
 $ am  : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ gear: num  4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 ...
 $ carb: num  4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 ...
> rownames(mtcars)
 [1] "Mazda RX4"           "Mazda RX4 Wag"       "Datsun 710"         
 [4] "Hornet 4 Drive"      "Hornet Sportabout"   "Valiant"            
 [7] "Duster 360"          "Merc 240D"           "Merc 230"           
[10] "Merc 280"            "Merc 280C"           "Merc 450SE"         
[13] "Merc 450SL"          "Merc 450SLC"         "Cadillac Fleetwood" 
[16] "Lincoln Continental" "Chrysler Imperial"   "Fiat 128"           
[19] "Honda Civic"         "Toyota Corolla"      "Toyota Corona"      
[22] "Dodge Challenger"    "AMC Javelin"         "Camaro Z28"         
[25] "Pontiac Firebird"    "Fiat X1-9"           "Porsche 914-2"      
[28] "Lotus Europa"        "Ford Pantera L"      "Ferrari Dino"       
[31] "Maserati Bora"       "Volvo 142E"         
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In the mtcars data.frame, they have set the rownames for the data.frame = the name of the car. You can check this out by doing something like this:

data(mtcars)
rownames(mtcars)

You can also set the rownames for an object. From the help page:

m2 <- cbind(1,1:4)
rownames(m2) <- rownames(m2, do.NULL = FALSE, prefix = "Obs.")

The equivalent funcitonality exists with colnames.

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