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I'm trying to create a regular expression for matching latitude/longitude coordinates. For matching a double-precision number I've used (\-?\d+(\.\d+)?), and tried to combine that into a single expression:

^(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?),\w*(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?)$

I expected this to match a double, a comma, perhaps some space, and another double, but it doesn't seem to work. Specifically it only works if there's NO space, not one or more. What have I done wrong?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Whitespace is \s, not \w

^(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?),\s*(\-?\d+(\.\d+)?)$

See if this works

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1  
Ah, a simple mistake! Thanks. :) –  Jake Petroules Aug 19 '10 at 4:31

Actually Alix Axel, above regex is wrong in latitude, longitude ranges point of view.

Latitude measurements range from –90° to +90° Longitude measurements range from –180° to +180°

So the regex given below validates more accurately.
Also, as per my thought no one should restrict decimal point in latitude/longitude.

^([-+]?\d{1,2}([.]\d+)?),\s*([-+]?\d{1,3}([.]\d+)?)$

OR for Objective C

^([-+]?\\d{1,2}([.]\\d+)?),\\s*([-+]?\\d{1,3}([.]\\d+)?)$
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This one will strictly match latitude and longitude values that fall within the correct range:

^[-+]?([1-8]?\d(\.\d+)?|90(\.0+)?),\s*[-+]?(180(\.0+)?|((1[0-7]\d)|([1-9]?\d))(\.\d+)?)$

Matches

  • +90.0, -127.554334 45, 180
  • -90, -180
  • -90.000, -180.0000
  • +90, +180
  • 47.1231231, 179.99999999

Doesn't Match

  • -90., -180.
  • +90.1, -100.111
  • -91, 123.456
  • 045, 180
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This is awesome. Kudos for the range check inclusion. –  radj Feb 23 at 4:17

Here is a more strict version:

^([-+]?\d{1,2}[.]\d+),\s*([-+]?\d{1,3}[.]\d+)$
  • Latitude = -90 -- +90
  • Longitude = -180 -- +180
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1  
I believe that {1,2} should come first, then {1,3} –  randunel Apr 2 '13 at 9:34
    
@Arjan: Fixed, I always confuse the two. Thanks! –  Alix Axel Apr 23 '13 at 14:25

I believe you're using \w (word character) where you ought to be using \s (whitespace). Word characters typically consist of [A-Za-z0-9_], so that excludes your space, which then further fails to match on the optional minus sign or a digit.

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this would work for format like this: 31 ͦ 37.4' E

^[-]?\d{1,2}[ ]ͦ[ ]\d{1,2}.?\d{1,2}[ ]\x27[ ]\w$

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Try this:

^(\()([-+]?)([\d]{1,2})(((\.)(\d+)(,)))(\s*)(([-+]?)([\d]{1,3})((\.)(\d+))?(\)))$

Check it out at:

http://regexpal.com/

Paste the expression in the top box, then put things like this in the bottom box:

(80.0123, -34.034)
(80.0123)
(80.a)
(980.13, 40)
(99.000, 122.000)

Regex breakdown:

^                    # The string must start this way (there can't be anything before). 
    (\()             # An opening parentheses (escaped with a backslash).
    ([-+]?)          # An optional minus, or an optional plus.
    ([\d]{1,2})      # 1 or 2 digits (0-9).
    (                # Start of a sub-pattern.
        (            # Start of a sub-pattern.
            (\.)     # A dot (escaped with a backslash).
            (\d+)    # One or more digits (0-9).
            (,)      # A comma.
        )            # End of a sub-pattern.
    )                # End of a sub-pattern.
    (\s*)            # Zero or more spaces.
    (                # Start of a sub-pattern.
        ([-+]?)      # An optional minus, or an optional plus. 
        ([\d]{1,3})  # 1 to 3 digits (0-9).
        (            # Start of a pattern.
            (\.)     # A dot (escaped with a backslash).
            (\d+)    # One or more digits (0-9).
        )?           # End of an optional pattern.
        (\))         # A closing parenthesis (escaped with a backkslash).
    )                # End of a pattern
$                    # The string must end this way (there can't be anything after).

Now, what this does NOT do is restrict itself to this range:

(-90 to +90, and -180 to +180)

Instead, it simple restricts itself to this range:

(-99 to +99, -199 to +199) 

But the point is mainly just to break down each piece of the expression.

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^-?[0-9]{1,3}(?:.[0-9]{1,10})?$

Regex breakdown:

^-?[0-9]{1,3}(?:.[0-9]{1,10})?$

-? # accept negative values

^ # Start of string

[0-9]{1,3} # Match 1-3 digits (i. e. 0-999)

(?: # Try to match...

. # a decimal point

[0-9]{1,10} # followed by one to 10 digits (i. e. 0-9999999999)

)? # ...optionally

$ # End of string

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^[-+]?(([0-8]\d|\d)(\.\d+)?|90(\.0+)?)$,\s*^[-+]?((1[0-7]\d(\.\d+)?)|(180(\.0+)?)|(\d\d(\.\d+)?)|(\d(\.\d+)?))$

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/(-?\d{1,2}[.]\d+)(?U:.*)(-?1?[0-8]?\d[.]\d+)/
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(?<!\d)([-+]?(?:[1-8]?\d(?:\.\d+)?|90(?:\.0+)?)),\s*([-+]?(?:180(?:\.0+)?|(?:(?:1[0-7]\d)|(?:[1-9]?\d))(?:\.\d+)?))(?!\d)

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5  
Pure code answers are rarely a good idea. Please add some descriptive text to your answer. –  timclutton Dec 4 '14 at 16:22
    
works great: validates accurately, and picks out lat, long from any surrounding text. Does not, however, limit the number of significant digits it allows after the decimal point. –  user4325241 Dec 11 '14 at 16:55

Ruby

Longitude -179.99999999..180

/^(-?(?:1[0-7]|[1-9])?\d(?:\.\d{1,8})?|180(?:\.0{1,8})?)$/ === longitude.to_s

Latitude -89.99999999..90

/^(-?[1-8]?\d(?:\.\d{1,8})?|90(?:\.0{1,8})?)$/ === latitude.to_s
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