Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently I have to work in an environment where the power-operator is bugged. Can anyone think of a method temporarily work around this bug and compute a^b (both floating point) without a power function or operator?

share|improve this question
    
will 'b' always be an integer? if so, just start with 1 and multiply it by a, b times –  Tom Sirgedas Aug 19 '10 at 5:40
    
a and b are both floating point and will not be natural numbers –  ymihere Aug 19 '10 at 5:46
    
do you have sqrt() available? –  Tom Sirgedas Aug 19 '10 at 6:01
    
i do have sqrt, yes. –  ymihere Aug 19 '10 at 6:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

if you have sqrt() available:

double sqr( double x ) { return x * x; }
// meaning of 'precision': the returned answer should be base^x, where
//                         x is in [power-precision/2,power+precision/2]
double mypow( double base, double power, double precision )
{   
   if ( power < 0 ) return 1 / mypow( base, -power, precision );
   if ( power >= 10 ) return sqr( mypow( base, power/2, precision/2 ) );
   if ( power >= 1 ) return base * mypow( base, power-1, precision );
   if ( precision >= 1 ) return sqrt( base );
   return sqrt( mypow( base, power*2, precision*2 ) );
}
double mypow( double base, double power ) { return mypow( base, power, .000001 ); }

test code:

void main()
{
   cout.precision( 12 );
   cout << mypow( 2.7, 1.23456 ) << endl;
   cout << pow  ( 2.7, 1.23456 ) << endl;
   cout << mypow( 1.001, 1000.7 ) << endl;
   cout << pow  ( 1.001, 1000.7 ) << endl;
   cout << mypow( .3, -10.7 ) << endl;
   cout << pow  ( .3, -10.7 ) << endl;
   cout << mypow( 100000, .00001 ) << endl;
   cout << pow  ( 100000, .00001 ) << endl;
   cout << mypow( 100000, .0000001 ) << endl;
   cout << pow  ( 100000, .0000001 ) << endl;
}

outputs:

3.40835049344
3.40835206431
2.71882549461
2.71882549383
393371.348073
393371.212573
1.00011529225
1.00011513588
1.00000548981
1.00000115129
share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice! I'll have to remember that technique! –  Jim Lewis Aug 19 '10 at 6:46
2  
+1; btw it's int main() and not void main :-) –  sasuke Aug 19 '10 at 6:54
    
thanks alot. this is precisely was what i was looking for. Out of interest: can you give me any background to that algorithm? –  ymihere Aug 19 '10 at 7:40
5  
Sure, the basic idea is that x^.5 = sqrt(x), x^.25 = sqrt(sqrt(x)), x^.125 = sqrt(sqrt(sqrt(x))), etc. With these building blocks, we can say x^.625 = (x^.5)*(x^.125). We can't express, say, x^.3 exactly, but we can get arbitrarily close. I implemented this a little differently, but it uses the same concept. –  Tom Sirgedas Aug 19 '10 at 15:28

You can use the identity ab = e(b log a), then all the calculations are relative to the same base e = 2.71828...

Now you have to implement f(x) = ln(x), and g(x) = e^x. The fast, low precision method would be to use lookup tables for f(x) and g(x). Maybe that's good enough for your purposes. If not, you can use the Taylor series expansions to express ln(x) and e^x in terms of multiplication and addition.

share|improve this answer
    
i have a working ln function. However, for the Taylor series I need powers again. –  ymihere Aug 19 '10 at 6:28
    
@ymihere: The Taylor series expansion only contains integer exponents, which can be reduced to multiplication. –  Jim Lewis Aug 19 '10 at 6:41
    
@ymihere: do you have exp() available? if so, this solution is best! –  Tom Sirgedas Aug 19 '10 at 15:29
    
@tom: i don't have exp. actually, that's what I am working around. –  ymihere Aug 20 '10 at 8:32

given that you can use sqrt, this simple recursive algorithm works:

Suppose that we're calculating aˆb. The way the algorithm works is by doing Fast Exponentiation on the exponent until we hit the fractional part, once in the fractional part, do a modified binary search, until we're close enough to the fractional part.

double EPS = 0.0001;

double exponentiation(double base, double exp){
  if(exp >= 1){
    double temp = exponentiation(base, exp / 2);
    return temp * temp;
  } else{
    double low = 0;
    double high = 1.0;

    double sqr = sqrt(base);
    double acc = sqr;    
    double mid = high / 2;

    while(abs(mid - exp) > EPS){
      sqr = sqrt(sqr);

      if (mid <= exp) {
          low = mid;
          acc *= sqr;
      } else{
          high = mid;
          acc *= (1/sqr);
      }

      mid = (low + high) / 2;
    }

    return acc;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.