Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm getting tired of using code like this:

var count = 0;
if (myEnumerable != null)
{
    count = myEnumerable.Count();
}

And this is a bit pedantic:

var count = (myEnumerable ?? new string[0]).Count();

Is there any tidier way of doing this? I once had a (badly named) PhantomCount extension method on IEnumerable<> that used my first code example, but it had something of a smell about it (besides the name).

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The problem is really in whatever is creating these enumerables. Unless you have a really good reason, anything that generates an iterable collection should return an empty collection instead of null. This would align with the Null-Object-Pattern, hence the benefits are the same.

My suggestion would be to fix whatever produces myEnumerable, or if you can't do this, add a check way earlier to see if it's null and react appropriately.

share|improve this answer
10  
+1 for diagnosing the root cause –  pickles Aug 19 '10 at 8:31
    
Have another +1. It is really good practise when designing an API to return empty collections rather than nulls to avoid placing a burden on developers to do testing like this all the time. –  uriDium Aug 19 '10 at 8:58
    
Depends. There is a difference between the list of all the really good wines made in Ireland (which is an empty list) and all the really good wines made in Narnia (which is null, because Narnia doesn't exist). Sometimes it is necessary to distinguish null from empty. I do agree that one should lean toward the returning empty though. –  Jon Hanna Aug 19 '10 at 10:12
1  
@Jon: Using null to signal a special condition is like an automobile applying the handbrake to indicate that it's low on gas. –  Anon. Aug 19 '10 at 10:22
1  
@Anon Using null to signal a null condition is like, eh, something really obvious and straight-forward and sensible. –  Jon Hanna Aug 19 '10 at 10:42

How about

count = myEnumerable == null? 0 : myEnumerable.Count()
share|improve this answer
1  
I have a feeling that hes going to ask for a tidier than this, +1 none the less :) –  VoodooChild Aug 19 '10 at 8:27
    
Your feeling is correct, but it's a good answer anyway. –  ProfK Aug 19 '10 at 9:01

I don't think using extension method is a bad idea.

public static int NullableCount<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection)
{
   return collection == null ? 0 : collection.Count();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I made exactly the same thing - just named it CountOrZero. I personally think it is clearer. –  Lasse Espeholt Aug 19 '10 at 8:30

I use a custom extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> EmptyIfNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return source ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>();
}

...

int count = myEnumerable.EmptyIfNull().Count();
share|improve this answer
    
+1, I think this is the cleanest of the extension method solutions listed. It's very explicit that you're assuming a null enumerable to simply be empty, after which you can work with the enumerable as usual. –  Dan Bryant Aug 19 '10 at 15:15

I would also write my own extension method CountOrZeroForNull, as shown in other answers.

Besides... Instead of:

var count = (myEnumerable ?? new string[0]).Count();
                          // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

you could write:

var count = (myEnumerable ?? Enumerable.Empty<string>()).Count();
                          // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

This doesn't alleviate your specific problem, but it circumvents allocation of an unused array. (Enumerable.Empty<T> is most likely implemented as a simple yield break statement.)

share|improve this answer
    
The current implementation of Enumerable.Empty<T> actually returns a singleton empty T[] array. –  LukeH Aug 19 '10 at 8:47
    
@LukeH: I wouldn't have thought that. Thanks for looking this up. –  stakx Aug 19 '10 at 8:52

Just create your own extension method that handles null enumerables as you wish.

public int CountOrNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    return source == null ? 0 : source.Count();
}

You can then simply use:

var list1 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
var list2 = (int[])null;

var count1 = list1.CountOrNull(); // 4
var count2 = list2.CountOrNull(); // 0

That's the great thing about extension methods. They still work fine even if the object on which (you appear to be) calling the method is null.

share|improve this answer
    
@Noldorin: Fixed a typo in your code example (the // 4 comment); perhaps verify that this is indeed what you intended. –  stakx Aug 19 '10 at 8:56
    
@stakx: Thanks; it was indeed a typo. –  Noldorin Aug 19 '10 at 9:00

What actions are you taking if the value returned is 0?

If that's what's interesting, maybe you should use Haack's IsNullOrEmpty extension method for IEnumerable like so:

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items) 
{
    return items == null || !items.Any();
}

The link is http://haacked.com/archive/2010/06/10/checking-for-empty-enumerations.aspx

Posted as a comment on the blog, you'll also find an Exception class I wrote to go with that:

public class ArgumentNullOrEmptyException : ArgumentNullException
{
    public ArgumentNullOrEmptyException( string paramName ) : base( paramName )
    {}

    public ArgumentNullOrEmptyException( string paramName, string message ) : base( paramName, message )
    {}

    public override string Message
    {
        get
        {
            return "Value cannot be null nor empty.{0}Parameter name: {1}".FormatWith( Environment.NewLine, ParamName );
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
var count = 0; 

if (myEnumerable != null) 
    count = myEnumerable.Count(); 

While it's not as technical as the other answers, it's far the most readable.

share|improve this answer
2  
I don't think those three lines are more readable than a well-named extension method. –  Lee Aug 19 '10 at 8:48
    
Yes, I want to avoid repeating the same check several times. That was the point of my question after all. –  ProfK Aug 19 '10 at 9:07
1  
Heh, maybe read the question? –  Jaco Pretorius Aug 19 '10 at 9:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.