Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I usually do something like this:

    Dim Attempts = 0
    Try
Retry:
        <Block>
    Catch
        If Attempts < 3 Then
            Attempts += 1
            Thread.Sleep(2000)
            GoTo Retry
        Else
            Throw
        End If
    End Try

This is really bad looking for me, but i don't know of a better way of doing it.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that's a bad usage, I use this one, and it's much cleaner.

Dim maxAttempt As Integer = 2

For i As Integer = maxAttempt To 0 Step -1

 Try
    ...
    'Successful Quit
    Exit For

  Catch
     Thread.Sleep(2000)

  End Try
Next 
share|improve this answer
1  
Be aware that you are silently catching all exceptions, even in the last try where the exception should be passed. It would also be better to catch only a very specific exception inside the for loop (the one that is thrown due to the transient error). You don't want to retry on an ArgumentException for instance. –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Aug 19 '10 at 9:15
    
but how i throw away the last exception? that's important –  ariel Aug 19 '10 at 9:16
    
ok, i could do "If i = 0 Then Throw" inside the catch.. –  ariel Aug 19 '10 at 9:17

Just use a For loop or a While loop rather than GoTo, breaking on success. But other than that, it's the right approach.

share|improve this answer
    
@Job Skeet: It woulb be nice if .NET languages had such constructs. –  the_drow Aug 19 '10 at 9:03
    
Sorry but i dont see how this can be done. The loop would enclose the whole Try ? –  ariel Aug 19 '10 at 9:05

You could also try the following:

Dim retryCount as Integer = 0
Dim wasSuccessful as Boolean = False

Do
    Try
        <statements>
        'set wasSuccessful if everything was okay.'
        wasSuccessful = True
    Catch
        retryCount +=1
    End Try
Loop Until wasSuccessful = True OrElse retryCount >=5

'check if the statements were unsuccessful'
If Not wasSuccessful Then
    <do something>
End If

It will retry up to five times if the statements were not successful but will immediately exit the loop if the statements' execution was successful.

share|improve this answer
1  
Now if you do this statement along with catching the specific exception at: Catch ex as SpecificExceptionType : retryCount += 1 : End Try I like this solution, it seems a bit more elegant than a recursive retry or GoTo block. –  Blue Aug 19 '10 at 9:42

Conceptually it's the right approach, although I would not catch each and every exception, see answer by @0xA3.

You could make it a bit 'prettier' by separating the retry logic from the actual code, e.g.:

    Sub TryExecute(Of T As Exception)(ByVal nofTries As Integer, 
                                      ByVal anAction As Action)
        For i As Integer = 1 To nofTries - 1
            Try
                anAction()
                Return
            Catch ex As T
                Thread.Sleep(2000)
            End Try
        Next
        ' try one more time, throw if it fails
        anAction()
    End Sub

Which could then be used like so:

TryExecute(Of SomeExceptionType)(3, Sub()
                                      <Block>
                                    End Sub())

This will only work in VB 10, if you're using .Net 3.5 / VB 9, you need to separate this in a separate function

share|improve this answer
    
AFAIK you can't do Sub()<Block>End Sub() in VB.NET 3.5 or can you? –  dr. evil Aug 19 '10 at 10:20
    
@dr. evil That's right, as written the code will only work in VB.Net 10 (.Net 4) –  jeroenh Aug 19 '10 at 10:52
    
Oh I see, haven't touch VB.NET 10 yet. It's good to see finally VB got anon delegates as well. –  dr. evil Aug 19 '10 at 14:07

In general, retrying something that failed should be considered very carefully. Usually it is much better to report the error and let the user decide.

Raymond Chen gives a nice example how automatic retries might lead to unwanted problems and gives the advice to avoid retrying:

Take it easy on the automatic retries

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. It's less of a problem if you catch more specific exception types though. –  jeroenh Aug 19 '10 at 9:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.