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What is the best approach in stripping leading and trailing spaces in C?

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13 Answers 13

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do this entirely in place.

 void stripLeadingAndTrailingSpaces(char* string){

     assert(string);

     /* First remove leading spaces */

     const char* firstNonSpace = string;

     while(*firstNonSpace != '\0' && isspace(*firstNonSpace))
     {
          ++firstNonSpace;
     }

     size_t len = strlen(firstNonSpace)+1;         

     memmove(string, firstNonSpace, len);

     /* Now remove trailing spaces */

     char* endOfString = string + len;

     while(string < endOfString  && isspace(*endOfString))
     {
          --endOfString ;
     }

     *endOfString = '\0';

}
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3  
There are two problems with this: (1) strcpy has undefined behaviour if the source and destination buffers overlap (use memmove or a while loop to copy the string), and (2) consider what happens if the string contains embedded whitespace characters, not just leading and trailing spaces. –  ChrisN Dec 9 '08 at 8:48
1  
I don't really like the use of assert here. In my mind, assert means 'this really shouldn't happen, but just in case', whereas a null pointer passed to this function is quite possible. Perhaps it is merely taste. –  Bernard Dec 9 '08 at 11:16
1  
My interpretation is this: A string which consists of one or more printable characters is of course a string. An empty string (containing only the null terminator) is also a string. However, a string which is just a null pointer is not a string at all; this is a precondition violation. –  AlfaZulu Dec 9 '08 at 11:31
2  
I would like to see this calculate the size that actually NEEDS to be memmoved rather than memmoving the whole string and then trimming the trailing spaces. –  SoapBox Dec 9 '08 at 11:59
2  
Any solution eliciting this much commentary is not a strong solution. –  Norman Ramsey Dec 10 '08 at 8:19

Here is how linux kernel does the trimming, called strstrip():

char *strstrip(char *s)
{
    size_t size;
    char *end;

    size = strlen(s);

    if (!size)
    	return s;

    end = s + size - 1;
    while (end >= s && isspace(*end))
    	end--;
    *(end + 1) = '\0';

    while (*s && isspace(*s))
    	s++;

    return s;
}

Its basically a better formatted and error-checked version what the previous poster said.

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2  
This implementation is easy to misuse. A naive user is likely to try to free the returned pointer (or overwrite their original pointer). Since we're not working in the kernel, I think it would be nicer to copy the trimmed string to the beginning of the buffer :) –  AlfaZulu Dec 9 '08 at 8:54
1  
This looks quite bad. You're not only altering the original string but creating another pointer at a different location; I'd say this is a bad example at this level; I also agree that a buffer should be passed, or the result stored somewhere else. –  Christopher Lightfoot Dec 9 '08 at 9:52
    
...If you don't keep the original pointer; surely you've just caused a memory leak as the initial "space" can never be recovered. –  Christopher Lightfoot Dec 9 '08 at 9:53
2  
This discussion shows that what makes a good answer depends on the context in which the code will be used. If preserving the original string is important, this is not the solution; otherwise, this works. It also works unless tracking the initial pointer is important or a memory copy is an issue, –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 9 '08 at 15:39
    
To address the concerns listed in the comments, you could just return strdup(s) and require the caller free the result. (i know non-standard but it's like 4 lines to hand roll if you don't have it). –  Evan Teran Dec 9 '08 at 19:19

This question looks as if it might be a homework question, so I'll answer obliquely: look up the man pages for isspace(3) and strlen(3) and use pointer arithmetic. Also depending on the problem at hand you may need malloc(3) to hold space for the result.

Don't forget that the representation of a C string includes a trailing 0 byte, often written '\0', which is not counted as part of the length of the string.

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Here's a version using isspace:

char * trim(char *c) {
    char * e = c + strlen(c) - 1;
    while(*c && isspace(*c)) c++;
    while(e > c && isspace(*e)) *e-- = '\0';
    return c;
}
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char *strstrip(char *s)
{
    char *end;

    while ( (*s) && isspace( *s))
        s++;

    if(!( *s) )
        return s;
    end = s;

    while( ! *end)
        end++;
    end--;

    while (end ! = s && isspace( *end))
        end--;
    *(end + 1) = '\0';

    return s;
}

It is basically a more optimized code (in terms of speed & codesize ).

If we need to retain memory space then,

void strstrip(char *s)
{
    char *start;
    char *end;

    start = s; 
    while ( (*start) && isspace( *start))
        start++;

    if(!( *start) ) 
    {
        *s='\0';
        return ;
    }
    end = start;

    while( ! *end)
        end++;
    end--;

    while (end ! = start && isspace( *end))
        end--;
    *(end + 1) = '\0';

    memmove(s, start, end-start+1);

    return;
}
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Here is a more concise and safer version of lakshmanaraj's first function:

#include <ctype.h>
char *mytrim(char *s)
{
    if(s) { /* Don't forget to check for NULL! */
        while(*s && isspace(*s))
            ++s;
        if(*s) {
            register char *p = s;
            while(*p)
                ++p;
            do {
                --p;
            } while((p != s) && isspace(*p));
            *(p + 1) = '\0';
        }
    }
    return(s);
}
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checking s is not null should be done before the function call. Assume s is a garbage pointer and then how do you gaurantee that this program? Hence bset practice is that S should be checked before the function call and not inside the function call. –  lakshmanaraj Feb 6 '09 at 5:38
    
@lakshmanaraj: I said safer...not safe. What if our user is on a non-standard system and wants to call the function like this: mytrim(strdup(x));? –  anon Feb 7 '09 at 19:44

A refinement of another post above.

void  strstrip( char *s )
{
  char *start;
  char *end;

  // Exit if param is NULL pointer
  if (s == NULL)
    return;

  // Skip over leading whitespace
  start = s;
  while ((*start) && isspace(*start))
    start++;      

  // Is string just whitespace?
  if (!(*start)) 
  {         
    *s = 0x00; // Truncate entire string
    return;     
  }     

  // Find end of string
  end = start;
  while (*end)         
    end++;     

  // Step back from NUL
  end--;      

  // Step backward until first non-whitespace
  while ((end != start) && isspace(*end))         
    end--;     

  // Chop off trailing whitespace
  *(end + 1) = 0x00;

  // If had leading whitespace, then move entire string back to beginning
  if (s != start)
    memmove(s, start, end-start+1);      

  return; 
} 
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For those who would like to see a recursive solution, I offer this:

static char* trim_left_ptr(char* str)
{
    if (*str == 0)
    {
        // no more in string. It is an empty string
        return str;
    }

    if (*str == ' ' || *str == '\t')
    {
        // it is space or tab. Try next.
        return trim_left_ptr(str + 1);
    }


    // found left side of string
    return str;
}


static char* trim_right_ptr(char* str)
{
    if (*str == 0)
    {
        // found end of string
        return str;
    }

    // try next (recursion)
    char* ptr = trim_right_ptr( str + 1 );

    // on the return from recursion.
    // ptr == str until a nonspace/nontab is found.
    if (*(ptr - 1) == ' ' || *(ptr - 1) == '\t')
    {
        // is space or tab. Have not yet found right side
        return ptr - 1;
    }

    // found right side of string
    return ptr;
}



char* trim(char* str)
{
    char* L_Ptr = trim_left_ptr(str);
    char* R_Ptr = trim_right_ptr(str);

    // calculate characters to store in new buffer
    _int32 sz = R_Ptr - L_Ptr;

    // allocate buffer
    char* newstr = (char*) malloc(sz + 1);

    // copy trimmed string
    memcpy(newstr, L_Ptr, sz);

    // terminate string
    *(newstr + sz) = 0;

    return newstr;
}

Of course, it is not the only possible recursive solution.

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int i = strlen(s) - 1;
while (isspace(s[i]))
    s[i--] = '\0';
while (isspace(*s))
    s++;

That should take care of the problem as long as you don't care about mangling up the string like crazy and if you don't care about memory leaks!

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1  
what heppens if s contains only spaces? ;-) –  Serge Dec 9 '08 at 8:11
    
This will under run if s is zero lenth or contains only spaces. –  Binary Worrier Dec 9 '08 at 8:25

You should be able to do it in-place; stripping whitespace can never cause the string to grow. You might be able to do it without first checking the length of the string, but doing so might be needlessly "clever". You should look into the memmove() function, in addition to the ones @Norman Ramsey mentioned.

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If you're on Linux/Windows and have the library glib linked into your program, you can use the the routine g_strstrip().

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char *strip(char *string)
{
    char *start = string;
    while(isblank(*start)) start++;
    int end = strlen(start);
    if(start != string) {
        memmove(string, start, end);
        string[end] = '\0';
    }
    while(isblank(*(string+end-1))) end--;
    string[end] = '\0';
    return string;
}
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Correted algorithm from fpsgamer (also ISO C90 valid):

void trimWhitespace(char *string) {
    const char* firstNonSpace = string;
    char* endOfString;
    size_t len;

    if (string[0] == '\0') {
        return;
    }

    /* First remove leading spaces */
    while(*firstNonSpace != '\0' && isspace(*firstNonSpace)) {
        ++firstNonSpace;
    }
    len = strlen(firstNonSpace) + 1;
    memmove(string, firstNonSpace, len);

    /* Now remove trailing spaces */
    endOfString = string + len;

    while(string < endOfString && (isspace(*endOfString) || *endOfString == '\0')) {
        --endOfString ;
    }

    *(endOfString + 1) = '\0';
}
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1  
Can you please add some explanation of how this corrects or improves on his answer? (Please include the explanation in the answer rather than replying in a comment) –  Adi Inbar Apr 22 at 23:42

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