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I'm trying to do a simple implementation of the Specification pattern in my domain layer.

If I have a static class full of specifications like this:

public static class FooSpecifications
{
  public static Func<Foo, bool> IsSuperhuman
  {
    get
    {
      return foo => foo.CanShootLasersOutOfItsEyes && foo.CanFly;
    }
  }
}

Then I can do marvellous things like this:

IEnumerable<Foo> foos = GetAllMyFoos();
var superFoos = foos.Where(FooSpecifications.IsSuperhuman);

I can also add bool method to Foo to determine if a particular instance meets a specification:

public bool Meets(Func<Foo, bool> specification)
{
  return specification.Invoke(this);
}

Given that Foo, like all my domain entities, extends DomainObject, is there a way I can put a generic implementation of Meets() into the DomainObject to save me implementing Meets() separately in every entity?

share|improve this question
    
Tip: you can use Predicate<T> instead of Func<T, bool>. –  Paul Ruane Aug 19 '10 at 10:49
2  
@Paul: You can, but the trend in more recent versions of the framework, and especially LINQ, is to use Func<T,bool> rather than Predicate<T>. –  LukeH Aug 19 '10 at 10:54
    
@LukeH: Interesting, did not know this (obviously) thanks. –  Paul Ruane Aug 19 '10 at 12:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Something like this...

    public abstract class DomainObj<T> // T - derived type
        where T : DomainObj<T>
    {
        public bool Meets(Func<T, bool> specification)
        {
            return specification.Invoke((T) this);
        }
    }

    public class Foo : DomainObj<Foo> {}

    public class Bar : DomainObj<Bar> {}       

        Func<Foo, bool> foospec = x => true;
        Func<Bar, bool> barspec = x => true;

        var foo = new Foo();
        var bar = new Bar();
        foo.Meets(foospec);
        foo.Meets(barspec); // won't compile because of mismatched types of spec and object instance

EDIT

Maybe it will be better to translate Meet method to extension. This will remove need in type parameter.

    public abstract class DomainObj
    {
    }

    public static class DomainObjExtensions
    {
        public static bool Meets<T>(this T obj, Func<T, bool> f)
            where T : DomainObj
        {
            return f(obj);
        }
    }

    public class Foo : DomainObj {}

    public class Bar : DomainObj {}

    Func<Foo, bool> foospec = x => true;
    Func<Bar, bool> barspec = x => true;

    var foo = new Foo();
    var bar = new Bar();
    foo.Meets(foospec);
    foo.Meets(barspec); // error
share|improve this answer
    
What are the braces after the derived class declarations? When I put them in, I start getting 'namespace cannot contain members' compiler errors. –  David Aug 19 '10 at 11:08
    
Either way, in the derived class the compiler doesn't recognise the DomainObject type, even though they're in the same namespace. –  David Aug 19 '10 at 11:09
    
My bad: I had pasted some of your code but not noticed you were using DomainObj instead of DomainObject. –  David Aug 19 '10 at 11:13
    
This appears to work but now I have another problem. How do I cast a derived type back to DomainObject<T>? –  David Aug 19 '10 at 11:16
    
Sorry, I don't mean cast derived type to DomainObject, rather cast an object to DomainObject. –  David Aug 19 '10 at 11:28

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