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I'd like to do some work every 5 seconds. When I say every 5 seconds I mean on 00:00, 00:05, 00:10, 00:15, 00:20 according to the system clock. Not every 5 seconds since the timer is started.

Is there a .net timer which can do this already - I can't find one?

I can think of two work arounds...

  1. Have a very high resolution timer and read the system clock each timer event. Fire off my work immediatelly after each whole 5 secods has passed.

  2. Have a very high resolution timer and read the system clock each timer event. Fire off a second timer which has a resolution of 5 seconds immediatelly after each whole 5 secods has passed.

Not happy with either approach - the first puts unnecessary load on the cpu (depending on how high the reolution is). The second method might drift after a very long time. I don't know whether that's true or not.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not directly, but you could set a one short timer to trigger at the next 5s multiple, and in that event handler set up the every 5s schedule.

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All the usual Timers (WinForms, Threading, Timer) have a ~20 ms resolution.

You can use any of these in one-shot mode and recalculate the time in ms to the next 5sec point. Expect an error of 0..100 ms.

If that is too much you will need a hires timer, but be aware that they are quite a load on your system.

But note that your thread/process could be swapped out for N * 20ms at any moment.

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If I left the timer running, with events every 5 seconds, would it eventually drift or would it average out ok over a long time? I don't mind a bit of drift due to threading but as long as it sorts itself out when the process is swapped back in then that's ok. –  flobadob Aug 19 '10 at 13:35

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