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I have a 2D array of Numpy data read from a .csv file. Each row represents a data point with the final column containing a a 'key' which corresponds uniquely to 'key' in another Numpy array - the 'lookup table' as it were.

What is the best (most Numponic) way to match up the lines in the first table with the values in the second?

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4  
surely that should be numpythonic? –  PreludeAndFugue Aug 19 '10 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Some example data:

import numpy as np

lookup = np.array([[  1.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
                   [  2.     ,   2.71818,   3.7    ],
                   [  3.     ,  42.     ,  43.     ]])

a = np.array([[ 1, 11],
              [ 1, 12],
              [ 2, 21],
              [ 3, 31]])

Build a dictionary from key to row number in the lookup table:

mapping = dict(zip(lookup[:,0], range(len(lookup))))

Then you can use the dictionary to match up lines. For instance, if you just want to join the tables:

>>> np.hstack((a, np.array([lookup[mapping[key],1:] 
                            for key in a[:,0]])))
array([[  1.     ,  11.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
       [  1.     ,  12.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
       [  2.     ,  21.     ,   2.71818,   3.7    ],
       [  3.     ,  31.     ,  42.     ,  43.     ]])    
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+1, building an auxiliary dict is clearly the way to go. –  Alex Martelli Aug 19 '10 at 15:25
    
+1 for getting +1 from Alex Martelli ;) And for having a useful answer, of course. –  Wayne Werner Aug 19 '10 at 15:49
2  
For whatever it's worth, there is a built-in numpy function to do this: numpy.lib.recfunctions.join_by. projects.scipy.org/numpy/browser/trunk/numpy/lib/… It's rather clunky if you're not already using structured arrays, though. –  Joe Kington Aug 19 '10 at 15:53
    
Can someone explain to me what this portion does exactly? np.array([lookup[mapping[key],1:] for key in a[:,0]]) –  Carl Sep 29 '14 at 5:39
1  
@Carl, it takes each key from the first column of a and looks up the matching row in the lookup array. Then it makes an array of those rows, leaving out the first column (the key). –  Vebjorn Ljosa Oct 1 '14 at 1:25

In the special case when the index can be calculated from the keys, the dictionary can be avoided. It's an advantage when the key of the lookup table can be chosen.

For Vebjorn Ljosa's example:

lookup:

>>> lookup[a[:,0]-1, :]
array([[  1.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
       [  1.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
       [  2.     ,   2.71818,   3.7    ],
       [  3.     ,  42.     ,  43.     ]])

merge:

>>> np.hstack([a, lookup[a[:,0]-1, :]])
array([[  1.     ,  11.     ,   1.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
       [  1.     ,  12.     ,   1.     ,   3.14   ,   4.14   ],
       [  2.     ,  21.     ,   2.     ,   2.71818,   3.7    ],
       [  3.     ,  31.     ,   3.     ,  42.     ,  43.     ]])
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