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I've got this subclass implementing my Interface and there are no errors in terms of satisfying the contract. However when I try to set the current session in the sub class's constructor I get this compile-time error when it tries to compare the variable type with the returned type of GetCurrentSession():

"Cannot convert source type IAPISession to target type FacebookSession"

Ok why? Facebook is a IAPISession... right??? polymorphism at play is my thinking so it should be happy with this comparison. Not sure here.

public class FacebookSession : IAPISession
{
    private FacebookSession currentSession;

    private FacebookSession()
    {
        currentSession = GetCurrentSession();
    }

    ...more code

    public IAPISession GetCurrentSession()
    {
        // my logic is here...whatever that may be
    }
     ... more code
 }

Updated

here's my actual interface:

public interface IAPISession
{
    #region Properties

    int SessionID { get; }

    string UserID { get; }

    bool SessionHasExpired { get; }

    DateTime ExpirationDate { get; }

    void LogOut(); // expires the session & sets SessionHasExpired

    #endregion Properties

    #region Methods

    IAPISession GetCurrentSession();

    #endregion Methods

}

This interface will be utilized across any API wrapper projects of ours (e.g. FlickrSession, etc.)

share|improve this question
    
so just a quick comment. I see a lot of people here gunning for a Singleton because it's close to looking and functioning like a Singleton. But the usage of sessions in my case are a 1x1 relationship..user to unique session. A user will have many unique types of sessions (i.e. FacebookSession, PicasaSession, FlickrSession, and so on). So UserA will have several unique sessions depending on what API they've signed into via our code. When looking at this page from SwDevMan81, it reads " lets clients access its unique instance". Singletons are to be used for many to one resource situations –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 19:14
    
A few days ago I thought I was just going to make these singletons but a good programmer friend of mine says in my case, it's the wrong use..you should not use a Singleton here due the fact that you're not sharing anything...that is a session is specific to one person, one thread. It's not that many threads "users" are using -one- specific session floating around. They each have multiple of their own based on what APIs they're logging into. As I look at that article by Gang of Four, it completely backs up what he stated, that it's many to one (singleton) relationships where it makes sense –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 19:15
    
Thanks all for your help..really appreciate it. –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 21:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes this needs an explicit cast. You are receiving a generic (interface) session, but you want to use specific (Facebook) methods/fields.

You might envisage a scenario where GetCurrentSession() returns a different type of IAPISession!

  • use currentSession = (FacebookSession) GetCurrentSession();

  • use a try block around the cast to catch this possibility. I assume your code would get confused if it weren't a type of FacebookSession, so you need to deal with that situation.

Addition

Just to clarify:

FacebookSession fbSess;
IAPISession     genSess;
FacebookSession getFbSession() { ... return this; }
IAPISession     getSession()   { ... return this; }

genSess = getSession();        // legal
genSess = getFbSession();      // legal - implicit cast works as FacebookSession 
                               // is always a kind of IAPISession
fbSess  = getFbSession();      // legal
fbSess  = getSession();        // ILLEGAL - not all IAPISession's will be
                               // kinds of FacebookSession
fbSess  = (FacebookSession) getSession();
                               // legal, but might throw a class cast exception
                               // if it isn't a FacebookSession.

and likewise,

genSess = fbSess;              // ok, implicit cast to generic type
fbSess  = genSess;             // ILLEGAL, it may not be a FacebookSession
fbSess  = (FacebookSession) genSess; 
                               // legal but can throw an exception
share|improve this answer
    
so unlike abstract classes..whereas if I were to do something like this: MyMethod(SomeAbstractType type) where I could pass any subtype to this method that inherits SomeAbstractType, the same technique is not true to interfaces. Just because I have MyMethod(IAPISession session) doesn't mean I can pass in any subclass which has implemented IAPISession? So polymorphism works differently in the case of interfaces? Or am I just completely missing something beginner here that I've not taken into account with the concept of polymorphism and interfaces? –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 16:31
    
OK I've answered this by adding an example –  Sanjay Manohar Aug 19 '10 at 17:58
    
got it was wrong interfaces are no different than abstract classes in the polymorphism relm...you can definitely swap out an interface for its subtype in lets say a method param as I talkd about in my last reply. Thanks. –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 20:49

Although GetCurrentSession might actually be returning a FacebookSession, the return type is IAPISession and there is no implicit cast from an interface to any class implementing that interface.

Either change the return type of the GetCurrentSession method to FacebookSession or change the currentSession field type to IAPISession (or both if it makes sense to do so).

share|improve this answer
    
but I thought due to polymorphism (an interface variable or lets say method param can take in any class which has implemented that interface into your method or set to your variables...just like an abstract class method param or variable type can take in any subclass which has implemented it). Isn't that a major purpose of using interfaces due to polymorphism?? –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 16:16
    
(Either change the return type of the GetCurrentSession method to FacebookSession) I can't because that doesn't satisfy my Interface contract. My Interface defines an abstact public IAPISession GetCurrentSession(); method becaue my intent is that this interface will be implemented by other API type sessions (Flickr, etc.) and reused across other api projects of ours. So that means if I make the return type IAPISession on that method, I should be able to return that subtype even though the return type is set to IAPISession I thought. –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 16:18
    
It looks like you're part way towards the Singleton pattern. As it stands you have a GetCurrentSession() method that is not static so you'll need to create a sesson in order to get the current sesson! If a user of this class already has a reference to an instance of it, why would it ever need to call GetCurrentSession - it already has a session! –  Daniel Renshaw Aug 19 '10 at 16:29
4  
Polymorphism allows you to treat all FacebookSessions "as an" IAPISession but you can't do it the other way around since an IAPISesion may actually be a TwitterSession, for example. –  Daniel Renshaw Aug 19 '10 at 16:32
    
gotcha, so that's why I was able to send in any subclass which implemented an abstract class in a method expecting that abstract class param type. –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 16:35

You need the other way around:

public class FacebookSession : IAPISession
{
    private IAPISession currentSession;

    private FacebookSession()
    {
        currentSession = GetCurrentSession();
    }

    ...more code

    public FacebookSession GetCurrentSession()
    {
        // my logic is here...whatever that may be
    }
     ... more code
 }

If you want to use the specific implementation inside the class, then I would instantiate that class in the constructor. Then just return that instance in you GetCurrentSession class. For example:

public class FacebookSession : IAPISession
{
    private FacebookSession currentSession;

    private FacebookSession()
    {
        currentSession = new FacebookSession();
    }

    ...more code

    public IAPISession GetCurrentSession()
    {
        return currentSession;
    }
     ... more code
 }

And like Daniel mentions, this is getting close to the singleton pattern. See an implementation of it here. See the section under .NET Optimized Code

share|improve this answer
    
but not good if your logic requires specific FacebookSession methods. –  Sanjay Manohar Aug 19 '10 at 15:39
1  
IF GetCurrentSession() is defined on the interface, that would also need to return type IAPISession. –  Rowland Shaw Aug 19 '10 at 15:39
    
In which case it could just return IAPISession –  SwDevMan81 Aug 19 '10 at 15:40
    
And the downvote for what reason? –  SwDevMan81 Aug 19 '10 at 15:44
    
see the updated post, I added my interface definition –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 16:21

In C#, you can't cast from a more generic type (IAPISession, in your case) to a more specific type (FacebookSession) without using an explicit cast unless there is an implict cast defined.

Think about what would happen in this case:

var flickrSession = new FlickrSession();
var iApiFlickrSession = flickrSession as IAPISession;

var faceBookSession = iApiFlickrSession;

You can be guaranteed that an instance of FacebookSession is also an instance of IAPISession but you can't always be guaranteed that an instance of IAPISession is also an instance of FacebookSession.

In that second case, the compiler wouldn't know what to do.

What you could try is using the as operator (which may or may not work in your case). The value will be null if the cast fails:

currentSession = GetCurrentSession() as FacebookSession;
share|improve this answer
3  
Of course you can cast from more generic to more specific. (In your example, you will get a run-time error, but if the typed matched, it would work fine). –  James Curran Aug 19 '10 at 15:37
    
would you even need the as? I mean wouldn't it know by polymorphism that flickrSession is a IAPISession in your second line? –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 19:04
    
well, I'd rather design by compile time errors...good practice and must makes sense and is why typed is "good" –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 19:05

You must be explicit when you want to do that:

private FacebookSession() 
{ 
    currentSession = (FacebookSession) GetCurrentSession(); 
} 

Note that is will throw an exception of the object returned by GetCurrentSession() is not actually a FacebookSession.

UPDATE:

You seem to be confusing what happens at run-time with what happens at compile time:

    currentSession = GetCurrentSession(); 

This fails to compile, because, while the object returned by GetCurrentSession may be a FacebookSession object at run-time, all the compiler knows about it is that it implements IAPISession, and there could be many non-FacebookSeesion object which implement IAPISession.

    currentSession = (FacebookSession) GetCurrentSession(); 

Here you are telling the compiler, "Trust me -- when we run this, it's going be a FacebookSession object. If I'll lyin', you can crash the run with an exception!"

    currentSession = (int) GetCurrentSession(); 

This won't compile. You are trying to say "Trust me" blah-blah-blah, but the compiler calls your bluff say, "Baloney! There is no way a IAPISession can ever be an int"

share|improve this answer
    
GetCurrentSession DOES returns an IAPISession which sould be interchangable via polymorphism I thought since FaceookSession implements IAPISession –  MSSucks Aug 19 '10 at 16:22
    
@CoffeeAddict: Yes, so what you are trying won't crash at run-time. But you still must cast it! –  James Curran Aug 19 '10 at 16:34

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