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one of the threads in my application blocked at the following lock statement and resulted in a deadlock

void ExecuteCommand()
{
    lock(this._lockinstance)
    {
        // do some operation
    }
}

Is it possible to easily identify which thread is currently holding the lock?.. My application has more than 50 threads, which makes it difficult to go through each callstack using visual studio to locate the thread that holds the lock

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Some sample code to try out:

class Test {
    private object locker = new object();
    public void Run() {
        lock (locker) {  // <== breakpoint here
            Console.WriteLine(System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
        }
    }
}

Set a breakpoint on the indicated line. When it breaks, use Debug + Windows + Memory + Memory 1. Right click the window and choose "4-byte Integer". In the Address box, type &locker. The 2nd word is the thread ID of the thread that owns the lock. Step past the lock statement to see it change.

Beware that the number is the managed thread ID, not the operating system thread ID that you see in the Debug + Windows + Threads window. That kinda sucks, you probably should add some logging to your program that dumps the value of ManagedThreadId so you have a way to match the value to a thread.

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Make sure you have Debug > Options and Settings > Enable address level debugging so that the Memory windows will appear –  Anastasiosyal Feb 7 '12 at 17:47
6  
&locker doesn't seem to work. Just gives "Unable to evaluate the expression." locker works, but that doesn't then allow me to see the thread id as you describe. (VS2010) –  weston Dec 19 '12 at 10:48
    
Not working for me either - trying on 64 bit build, the expected managed ID was nowhere to be found in the memory monitor –  Amit Bens Jun 18 '14 at 15:19
    
Re-tested on VS2013, it still works fine. It is the 4th 4-byte integer for a 64-bit process. Further improved by the debugger's Debug + Windows + Threads window now displaying the managed thread ID. In decimal. Very important that the lock object is only ever used in a lock, it cannot work if code ever called GetHashCode() on it for example. There might be a Tools + Options, Debugging setting that matters, I can't imagine which one it might be. –  Hans Passant Jun 18 '14 at 15:28

Yes, there is a 'Threads' view that you can use in VS. Break anywhere in your application (or click the 'Break All' button) then you can select each thread and view who has the lock (if anyone).

To add it, go to Debug > Windows > Threads (Ctrl+D,T)

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+1 Yup. Hover the mouse over the thread to see a tooltip with the stack trace. Fifty threads, that's something you have to learn to avoid. –  Hans Passant Aug 19 '10 at 16:07
3  
Thanks. I know this technique. But very time consuming if number of threads is very high –  Maanu Aug 19 '10 at 16:08
    
@Hans Passant: In win32 (c++), it is possible to get the thread id of critical section by checking the attributes of the critical section object. Is there any similar technique available in c#? –  Maanu Aug 19 '10 at 16:25
    
@Maanu: yes you can find out. I'll post it as an answer. –  Hans Passant Aug 19 '10 at 16:45

The Managed Stack Explorer from http://mse.codeplex.com/ or http://www.microsoft.com/downloadS/details.aspx?FamilyID=80cf81f7-d710-47e3-8b95-5a6555a230c2&displaylang=en is excellent in such cases.

It hooks into running managed code (appropriate permissions needed) including live code, and grabs a list of running threads. You can double-click on any of them or (more useful in cases like this) select the lot and hit enter for a quick relatively non-invasive (obviously it's going to consume resources, but it goes in and out as quickly as it can) dump of the current stacks of different threads. Great for finding a deadlock, infinite loop, near-infinite loop (for those times when your application accidentally depends upon astronomers being pessimistic about how long the earth will last to have a hope of completing) and other such cases.

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You can implement a Monitor wrapper that saves stack traces & thread names on enter.

Old way:

private object myLock = new object();

...
lock(myLock)
{
    DoSomething();
}
...

With code below:

private SmartLock myLock = new SmartLock();

...
myLock.Lock( () =>
{
    DoSomething();
}
);
...

Source:

public class SmartLock
{
    private object LockObject = new object();
    private string HoldingTrace = "";

    private static int WARN_TIMEOUT_MS = 5000; //5 secs


    public void Lock(Action action)
    {
        try
        {
            Enter();
            action.Invoke();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Globals.Error("SmartLock Lock action", ex);
        }
        finally
        {
            Exit();
        }

    }

    private void Enter()
    {
        try
        {
            bool locked = false;
            int timeoutMS = 0;
            while (!locked)
            {
                //keep trying to get the lock, and warn if not accessible after timeout
                locked = Monitor.TryEnter(LockObject, WARN_TIMEOUT_MS);
                if (!locked)
                {
                    timeoutMS += WARN_TIMEOUT_MS;
                    Globals.Warn("Lock held: " + (timeoutMS / 1000) + " secs by " + HoldingTrace + " requested by " + GetStackTrace());
                }
            }

            //save a stack trace for the code that is holding the lock
            HoldingTrace = GetStackTrace();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Globals.Error("SmartLock Enter", ex);
        }
    }

    private string GetStackTrace()
    {
        StackTrace trace = new StackTrace();
        string threadID = Thread.CurrentThread.Name ?? "";
        return "[" + threadID + "]" + trace.ToString().Replace('\n', '|').Replace("\r", "");
    }

    private void Exit()
    {
        try
        {
            Monitor.Exit(LockObject);
            HoldingTrace = "";
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Globals.Error("SmartLock Exit", ex);
        }
    }
}
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