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Variable variables seem pretty cool, but I can't think of a scenario where one would actually use them in a production environment. What would such a scenario be? How were they used?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Its purpose, I guess, is to allow novice programmers to dynamically change data without using "complicated stuff" like composite types (arrays and objects).

I never use them.

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// allow novice programmers to dynamically change data without using "complicated stuff" like composite types (arrays and objects) // It is not complicated once it has been learned. –  dreftymac Nov 26 '12 at 23:18
1  
I think that's the meaning of the quotes. –  user151841 Nov 27 '12 at 15:19
1  
how did this answer get upvoted so many times and accepted? –  jasonszhao Jun 4 at 0:15

A variable variable is essentially an array (map/dictionary). The following are equivalent ideas:

<?php
$foo = array('a' => 1);
$bar = 'a';
echo $foo[$bar]."\n";

$foo_a = 1;
$bar = 'a';
$vv = "foo_$bar";
echo $$vv."\n";
?>

Thus if you wrap your "variable variables" into a parent array, you can do away with them.

I've seen people use variable properties inside classes:

<?php
class Foo
{
  private $a = 1;

  public function __get($key)
  {
    if (isset($this->$key)) return $this->$key;
  }
}

$foo = new Foo();
echo $foo->a;
?>

But again, you could use an array:

<?php
class Foo
{
  private $props = array('a' => 1);

  public function __get($key)
  {
    if (array_key_exists($key, $this->props))
      return $this->props[$key];
  }
}

$foo = new Foo();
echo $foo->a;
?>

And outside classes:

<?php
class Foo
{
  public $a = 1;
}

$foo = new Foo();
$prop = 'a';
echo $foo->{$prop};
?>

So you never "have" to use variable variables or variable properties when writing your own controlled code. My personal preference is to never use variable variables. I occasionally use variable properties, but prefer to use arrays when I'll be accessing data in that way.

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Personally, I use them fairly often. All calls of the following types use variable-variables:

$foo->$bar = 'test';
$foo->$bar();
$bar();

So any time you do a dynamic method/function call, you're using variable-variables...

A common use for this is accessing protected properties via the __get magic method. I've seen the following quite often:

public function __get($name) {
    return isset($this->$name) ? $this->$name : null;
}

Which by definition is using variable variables to provide read-access to the protected members...

I've never directly used the $$var syntax (and don't think I ever will). I have seen it used to access global variables by name global $$name; echo $$name;, but the same thing can be done with the $_GLOBALS[$name] syntax, so that's not a good use-case (not to mention that using global variables is usually seen as bad practice)...

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Those are not variable variables. Methods are not variables. –  Artefacto Aug 19 '10 at 16:31
    
Though they can be (kind of) if this go ahead: wiki.php.net/rfc/closures/… –  Artefacto Aug 19 '10 at 16:33
    
It's a variable-function. You're right. It still operates on the same principal though (where the variable is dereferenced to determine the execution path)... –  ircmaxell Aug 19 '10 at 16:35

Think of it for use in a template system where you are using PHP files and need to set in variables:

function fetch_template($file, $vars){
    $ret = 'File not loaded.';
    if(file_exists(TEMPLATE_PATH.$file)){
        //could do this with extract() but I am showing you
        foreach($vars as $varName => $value){
            ${$varName} = $value;
        }
        ob_start();
        include(TEMPLATE_PATH.$file);
        $ret = ob_get_contents();
        ob_end_clean();
    }
    return $ret;
}

Now assuming you used these variable names in your template, you could call it and pass variables into it for use.

echo fetch_template('hi_there.tpl', array('name'=>'JJ'));

Then in your template:

Hello <?php echo $name; ?>!
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This same thing can be done with extract –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 19 '10 at 16:20
2  
And now you have a bug $vars has a key "file". This is why variable variables (and extract, for that matter) are dangerous. Would it be so much harder to use something like $m['var'] in the template? –  Artefacto Aug 19 '10 at 16:23
    
@Daniel: the code example explicitly says that can be done with extract(). This was an example. @Artefecto: this was not produced to demonstrate security, but instead the use of variable variables. I never advocated passing in variables blindly like anything in the $_GET array. –  Jage Aug 19 '10 at 16:31
    
sorry, missed the comment –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 19 '10 at 17:18

I found it useful in a single scenario. I was having YouTube API results in JSON format, like this

 $obj->media$title => Video title

So I used it like

$mt = 'media$title';
$obj->$mt ;

So it worked for me here :)

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You could just do $obj->{'media$title'}. –  Artefacto Aug 19 '10 at 17:19

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