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What are, in your opinion, the pros/cons of the following extension method?

static class Log
{
    public static string AddToLog(this string input)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(input);
        return input;
    }

    public static string AddToLog(this string input, string format)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(format, input);
        return input;
    }
}

Usage scenario:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string tableName = "Bills".AddToLog("Default table name is {0}");

        "Starting...".AddToLog();
        "Creating table".AddToLog();
    }
}
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1  
Why would you do this? –  Paul Aug 19 '10 at 16:33
    
Seconded... why not AddToLog("hello world!")... what do you think the advantage of your approach is? –  James Gaunt Aug 19 '10 at 16:34
4  
Use log4net instead. –  user195488 Aug 19 '10 at 16:35
    
I think Trace.WriteLine is more appropriate than Console.WriteLine in this case. –  Jordão Aug 19 '10 at 16:48
1  
Look at NLog, log4net, or one of the many other logging libraries out there. Don't reinvent the wheel unless you can add significant functionality. –  chilltemp Aug 19 '10 at 16:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well they're static for a start, which is going to make testing more difficult and will couple everything more tightly.

I also personally think something like

Logger.Write("Starting..");

is more understandable than

"Starting...".AddToLog();
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1  
Agreed. Seems like a solution looking for a problem. Not that I'm not guilty of that myself of course :) –  Dzejms Aug 19 '10 at 16:38
    
Not sure what you mean by static methods making testing more difficult. Personally, there's nothing I love unit testing more than a public static method. –  ladenedge Aug 19 '10 at 16:39
    
Yeah, I'm the same with lambdas.. 'I'm sure I could somehow use a lambda to do this... But how?!' –  Grant Crofton Aug 19 '10 at 16:40
    
@ladenedge - yeah, I love testing them too! It's the methods which call them that start to get tricky... Unless you use TypeMock or something, but that's cheating! –  Grant Crofton Aug 19 '10 at 16:42
    
They're only more difficult to test because they use Console.WriteLine. Trace.WriteLine is more amenable to testing, because you can easily divert the output. –  Jordão Aug 19 '10 at 16:49

This makes for interesting, ruby like, syntax. However, like John said, just because you can doesn't mean you should.

This would confuse most C# developers out there and add unneeded confusion.

For the the specific purposes of logging there are far better ways to get what you want. My very first question would be, why are you rolling your own logging solution? Logging is a very well solved problem and you shouldn't be wasting dev cycles on something that, log4net for instance, does just fine.

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To me, it isn't very readable.

Just because you can doesn't mean you should :)

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I'm gonna go with not a good idea. I can't think of any reason to do this. It clutters the namespace, and it isn't very intuitive. (At least to me)

EDIT

Now that I think about it, I have seen some advocate extending simple objects like this, but a logger isn't a good case IMHO. If you are providing a .ToX() functionality, like converting an integer to a MPH string or something like that, an extension method might be useful, but a logger is just not a good fit.

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Normally instead of Console.WriteLine you have a call to your actual logging mechanism

Your logging API (if you are using one) could not only be able to log strings but also log any kind of objects.
For example in log4net you can call .Error method with an object parameter. Then the logging mechanism decides what information about the object to actually log.

The way you have done it defeats that idea.

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For proper logging, you would want far more than just some string. Date, source, category etc., which you may want to store in a more structured manner.

All in all, creating a logging extension method on String feels just plain wrong. The extension method's functionality should have a fairly strong association with the type it's operating upon, in line with the single responsibility principle. In the case as you described, that's clearly being violated.

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The biggest problem in this approach is it is nearly impossible to inject dependencies into static/extension methods very cleanly. Meaning your logging solution (presuming it is to become more complex than dumping things to stdout/console/debug) has to be spun up and configured to do just about any sort of testing on the project. Ever.

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