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import java.net.URL;
import java.net.URLConnection;
import java.sql.*;
public class searchlink{
public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {
    //String link="http://hosted.ap.org";
    Connection con=null;
    Statement stmt=null;
    Statement stmtR=null;
    if(con==null){
            SQLConnection.setURL("jdbc:sqlserver://192.168.2.53\\SQL2005;user=sa;password=365media;DatabaseName=LN_ADWEEK");
            con=SQLConnection.getNewConnection();
            stmt=con.createStatement();
            stmtR=con.createStatement();
    }
    ResultSet rs;
    rs=stmt.executeQuery("select url from urls where url='http://www.topix.com/rty/elyria-oh'");
    while(rs.next()){
    String mem=rs.getString(1);
    System.out.println("Result is "+mem);}
}
}

The above program prints the output if the query returns a row. If the query does not return any, the program stops without printing anything.

Instead of it getting stopped without printing anything, I want the program to identify that the query has returned nothing and print the output saying something like this " There is nothing returned after SQL query execution ".

How to identify using some method or variable that the query has been executed without returning any row?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted
bool hasRows = false;
while(rs.next()){
  hasRows = true;
  // do other stuff required.
}

if(!hasRows)
{
  // do stuff when no rows present.
}

-- or

if(!rs.next())
{
  // do stuff when no rows prsent.
}
else
{
  do{
  // do stuff required
  }while(rs.next());
}

keeping in mind that the check if(!rs.next()) will advance the cursor in the result set. Don't advance it again before you get the values.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mathew :) –  LGAP Aug 19 '10 at 17:25
    
+1 for the elegant second version. Unfortunately, the logic is harder to read, and you missed a semicolon. –  tc. Aug 19 '10 at 17:25
    
@tc thanks, got that semicolon in there, I always forget them in do-whiles. I agree it's not immediately obvious what you are doing in the second example. Like anything else it's all about personal tastes and team standards which side of the readability / elegance spectrum you choose to error on (though thankfully they aren't always mutually exclusive). –  Matthew Vines Aug 19 '10 at 17:31

The normal JDBC idiom is to collect the results in a collection like List<Entity>. The another normal idiom is to properly close resources in finally. Your code is leaking DB resources. If you run this repeatedly in a short time, then the DB will run out of resources.

Here's a kickoff example:

public List<Entity> list() throws SQLException {
    // Declare resources.
    Connection connection = null;
    Statement statement = null;
    ResultSet resultSet = null;
    List<Entity> entities = new ArrayList<Entity>();

    try {
        // Acquire resources.
        connection = database.getConnection();
        statement = connection.createStatement("SELECT id, name, value FROM entity");
        resultSet = statement.executeQuery();

        // Gather data.
        while (resultSet.next()) {
            Entity entity = new Entity(); 
            entity.setId(resultSet.getLong("id"));
            entity.setName(resultSet.getString("name"));
            entity.setValue(resultSet.getInteger("value"));
            entities.add(entity);
        }
    } finally {
        // Close resources in reversed order.
        if (resultSet != null) try { resultSet.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
        if (statement != null) try { statement.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
        if (connection != null) try { connection.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
    }

    // Return data.
    return entities;
}

This way you can use the usual List methods to determine the state of the result:

List<Entity> entities = entityDAO.list();

if (entities.isEmpty()) {
    // It is empty!
if (entities.size() == 1) {
    // It has only one row!
} else {
    // It has more than one row!
}

See also:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Balus... Ur answers are really helpful and very brief. Hope you will guide me till I become a good java programmer :) –  LGAP Aug 19 '10 at 17:53
    
You're welcome. –  BalusC Aug 19 '10 at 18:16
if (rs.hasNext())
{
    while(rs.next())
   {
    String mem=rs.getString(1);
    System.out.println("Result is "+mem);
   }

}
else
{
   System.out.println("There is nothing returned after SQL query execution ");
}

maybe~

share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe the ResultSet will be null, but rather instantiated and empty. –  Matthew Vines Aug 19 '10 at 16:56
    
Thanks, edited my reponse accordingly. –  Eton B. Aug 19 '10 at 16:59
    
Still not right. "rs.next()" will move it to the next row. You mean "rs.hasNext()" –  Jeff Walker Aug 19 '10 at 17:13

if(!rs.isBeforeFirst()) System.out.println("no data is returned");

share|improve this answer

The first (rs.next()) will tell you if any data was returned. React to that one, then loop through the rest (if there are any).

Below I extract the logic for what to do when there is a row into a separate method, and then call that after the "if" and within each "where".

   . . .


   ResultSet rs;
   rs=stmt.executeQuery("select url from urls where url='http://www.topix.com/rty/elyria-oh'");
   if (rs.next() {
      printRow(rs);
      while(rs.next()){
          printRow(rs);
      }
    }
    else {
        System.out.println("no data returned");
    }
  }

  static public printRow(ResultSet rs) {
    String mem=rs.getString(1);
    System.out.println("Result is "+mem);}
  }   

}
share|improve this answer
boolean got_result = false;
while (...) {
  got_result = true;
  ...
}
if (!got_result) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

Place a counter in your loop...

int count = 0;

while ( rs.next() )
{
    count++;

    String mem=rs.getString(1);   
    System.out.println("Result is "+mem);}
    .
    .
    .
}

then ...

if (count==0)
{
    // show your message "There is nothing returned after SQL query execution"
}

Any call to rs.next() moves the cursor so if (rs.next() == false) would bump you one ahead and make you skip the first result if you had 2 or more or miss it entirely if you had one result.

Good Luck,

Rick

share|improve this answer
    
Which fails if it returns 2**32 rows. –  tc. Aug 19 '10 at 17:24
    
With all due respect the statement while(rs.next()) works for 0,1,many results... count is incremented for any scenerio of 1 or more so testing count for non-zero yeilds the answer that you either found 1 or more records or none. At least thats what it looks like to me. Rick –  Rick Schmid Aug 23 '10 at 16:43

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