Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to use std::vector<T*>::push_back with std::mem_fun and std::binder1st, but it doesnt seem to be feasible, can this be done?

I've tried to exemplify with the code below.

#include <vector>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct A {
        int _Foo;
        virtual int AFoo() { return _Foo; };
};

struct B: public A {
        int BFoo(int bar) { return _Foo+bar ; };
};
struct C: public A {
        int CFoo() { return --_Foo; };
};

class MyContainer
{
        static const int MyArraySize = 100;
        A* MyArray[MyArraySize];

public:
        MyContainer() {
                int half = MyArraySize / 2;
                for( int i=0; i< half; ++i )
                        MyArray[i] = new B;
                for( int i=half; i < MyArraySize; ++i )
                        MyArray[i] = new C;
        }

        template<class T, class Fn1>
        int Execute( Fn1 func )
        {
                int count = 0;
                for( int i=0; i< MyArraySize; ++i ){
                        T* t = dynamic_cast<T*>(MyArray[i]);
                        if( t )
                        {
                                func(t);
                                ++count;
                        }
                }
                return count;
        }

        template<class T, class Res, class Arg>
        int Execute( mem_fun1_t<Res, T, Arg> func, Arg argument )
        {
                return Execute<T>( binder2nd< mem_fun1_t<Res,T,Arg> >( func, argument ) );
        }

        template<class T>
        vector<T*> GetItems()  // <-- This is the problem function
        {
                vector<T*> ret;
                Execute<T>( bind1st( mem_fun(&vector<T*>::push_back), ret ) );
                return ret;
        }
};

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
        MyContainer cont;
        cont.Execute<B>( mem_fun(&B::BFoo), 10 );
        cont.Execute<C>( mem_fun(&C::CFoo) );
        vector<B*> v = cont.GetItems<A>();  // <-- the problem function is called here.
        cout << "v.size = " << v.size() << endl;
}

My goal is to have a container class to which I can tell it to execute a function receiving the selected items ('A' objects or 'A' derivate objects) as parameters. But I didn't manage to use std::vector::push_pack with it.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that binder1st defines operator() as:

operator() (const typename Operation::second_argument_type& x) const

and mem_fun1_t defines operator() as:

S operator() (T* p, A x) const

The problem is that push_back is defined as:

void vector<T>::push_back(const T &x)

So what we end up with is this:

void mem_fun1_t::operator()(vector<T *> *p, const T *&x)

And:

void binder1st::operator()(const T *&&x)

In other words, a reference to a reference to a pointer. A reference to a reference doesn't exist in C++. The only decent way I can think of fixing this is to use boost::bind instead:

vector<T*> ret;
Execute<T>( boost::bind( mem_fun(&vector<T*>::push_back), &ret,  _1) );
return ret;

Also note that you had a bug, and need to pass bind &ret instead of just ret (as mem_fun expects a pointer, mem_fun_ref would work however).

share|improve this answer
1  
that bug was a typo creating an example, but thanks! Boost is not really an option right now. =/ –  Vargas Aug 19 '10 at 19:38
1  
You can always roll your own bind1st function and binder1st struct. Just copy their implementation but change const T &t to T t. That way you won't end up with the double reference. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Aug 20 '10 at 13:34
    
Thanks, great idea! –  Vargas Aug 20 '10 at 19:16

The easiest way to call member functions on the entire set of items in your container is to use for_each:

using namespace std; 
using namespace std::tr1;
vector<T> cont;
// ...
for_each( cont.begin(), cont.end(), 
    bind( &T::foo, 42 ) );

// assume void T::foo(int); exists

If you don't have tr1 you can use:

for_each( cont.begin(), cont.end(), 
   bind2nd( mem_fun( &s::foo ), 42 ) // first parameter is the object itself
);

I am not sure what you are trying to achieve here though. You have both compile time polymorphism (aka templates) and runtime polymorphism (aka virtual member functions). The design seems a bit too complicated. In fact the following definition suffices:

int Execute()        
{
      int count = 0;
      for( int i=0; i< MyArraySize; ++i ){
          MyArray[ i ]->Foo(); // assume virtual int A::Foo(); exists
          ++count;
      }
      return count;
}

However, as you may have found out, virtual members need to have the same signature in order to be overriden in sub-classes (otherwise you are overloading the function).

Note that the sample GetItems does not call a member function of the contained objects, it calls a member, namely, push_back on the vector container object.

If all you want to do is to copy the pointers from a vanilla array to a vector you could use vector's specialized ctor that takes two iterators:

template<class T>
vector<T*> GetItems()  // <-- This is the problem function
{
    return vector<T*>( &MyArray[ 0 ], &MyArray[ 0 ] + MyArraySize );
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm actually using VS2005 which does not support std::tr1, I've edited the question to update my goals. I know I can copy the array to the vector, I really wanted to know what exactly I am doing wrong... –  Vargas Aug 19 '10 at 18:54
    
VS2005 has a limited support for TR1. IIRC tr1::bind is not available though. However, if you are trying to call a member function of A or subclasses thereof the for_each should work with little change. See my updated answer. –  dirkgently Aug 19 '10 at 19:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.