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When returning values in php, is it considered good or bad practice to return mixed data types. I'm working on a project where I am constantly faced with methods that return an id number or null. I'm handling the null value by checking for null and returning -1 if it is null.

Another situation I find myself in a lot is where a method should do something and return a string. But sometimes it's not possible to return the string as it wasn't found or an exception happened. What's the best thing to do here? Return a string like 'failed' or something? This then creates a string coupling between methods, I think, as the calling method has to know exactly the string failure message to check for??

EDIT: OK there are a few different opinions already. I like the idea of returning false on failure and the actual result whatever its data type is on success. But... is there a defacto best practice when it comes to this? I mean, what do programmers in other languages do i.e. java and c++ etc in these situations?

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6 Answers 6

What I usually do is if the method worked, return the value, and if it failed return FALSE. That's what a lot of PHP's built-in methods do. So, then you can just check if the function returned FALSE or not.

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1  
Yeah that makes sense but i guess this is where im thinking that different data types are being returned. This isnt really allowed in many languages - is this good or bad practice? –  david Aug 19 '10 at 19:36
    
Returning mixed types isn't bad. –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 19 '10 at 19:38
    
PHP is not a strongly typed language and functions do not have an explicit return type like other languages. –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 19 '10 at 19:38
    
Returning mixed types itself isn't bad. But the use case will dictate what to do. Don't just return mixed types because you can. Return an appropriate response, or throw an exception if an exceptional condition applies. I can't stand functions that return false for a multitude of conditions so that you have to then hunt down (or try to) the reason why it failed... –  ircmaxell Aug 19 '10 at 20:13
1  
Stick with one return type. In the event of an error path throw an exception explaining the error, don't return an error message or code. It's your job to make strong decisions. Don't foist the error handling responsibility onto your api consumers. –  Josh Johnson Apr 1 at 17:50

I think it is bad practice to return mixed data types. It is possible, as you pointed out, but think about the readability and maintainability of your code. Make sure you comment what you are returning and why, I think that is going to be most important. If you are expecting back an int and you return -1 instead of null, comment that, so you (or someone else) doesn't go crazy trying to figure out what you were trying to do.

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instead of returning -1 better approach would be to return false,. and yes use documentation,. for example phpdoc to mention what the function returns –  ovais.tariq Aug 19 '10 at 19:38

Null is a fairly common return value to indicate that there is no return value. You should return null (not "failed", or -1) if the function wants to return no ID at all.

If it is exceptional that an ID was not found, you should throw an exception.

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+1 for mention of Exceptions. I wish the core used them more... –  ircmaxell Aug 19 '10 at 19:52

A function that returns mixed values is not considered bad., in fact thats the beauty of php, it being a dynamic language., so the thing to do is return false on failure and the required value if the function executes correctly,.

if( false == ( $data = do_something() ) ) return false;
else print_r( $data );
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3  
You should use ===, not ==. 0 == false is true. –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 19 '10 at 19:41
1  
0 == false is true so is null == false and '' == false and so forth,. using === or == usually depends on the situation,. –  ovais.tariq Aug 20 '10 at 15:37

I agree with the answers above.

However if you design a whole system, the "best practice" would be to use exceptions: always return something meaningful, and in case of anomaly, throw an exception. The caller can then deal with the situations he knows how to face, and let somebody higher catch the rest.

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1  
Yes but exceptions should be used for exceptional situations only surely. Id's not existing etc should really be handled by a proper return value? Dont you then get in to possibility of overusing exceptions and just using them for everything? –  david Aug 19 '10 at 19:56
1  
Well as the software architect you decide when to use it. I think exception is a great way to protect the execution of a part of the code. The problem with returning "false" is that you don't know the reason it's returned. So you have to clearly identify only ONE case where false can be returned (for example "end of loop"), or else you risk to mix up different errors. So in your API you write: returns: string in the usual case, false in end of loop, throw an exception in other cases. –  greg Aug 20 '10 at 13:15
    
Just wanted to +1 what @Greg said. Returning false (or "false") is an anti-pattern if you're doing exception-based programming. –  David Welch Jan 21 '13 at 15:54

Returning mixed type is bad, at least today in 2013. Boom! The way to go is to split this:

BAD, mixed return type style:

function checkResult($data)
{
    if ($data) {
        ...
        return $stuff;
    } else {
        return false;
    } 
}

People will need additional logic to work checkRsult(), and they never know exactly what type will return.

GOOD, clearly fixed return type style:

Maybe the example is not really good, but it shows the way to go.

function doesResultExist($data)
{
    if ($data) {
        return true;
    }
    // default return
    return false;
}

function getResultData()
{
    ...
    return $stuff;   
}
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