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Is there anyway to make it so that the following code still uses a switch and returns b not a? Thanks!

$var = 0;
switch($var) {
    case NULL : return 'a'; break;
    default : return 'b'; break;
}

Using if statements, of course, you'd do it like this:

$var = 0;
if($var === NULL) return 'a';
else return 'b';

But for more complex examples, this becomes verbose.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Sorry, you cannot use a === comparison in switch, since according to the switch() documentaion:

Note that switch/case does loose comparision.

This means you'll have to come up with a work around. From the loose comparisons table, you could make use of the fact that NULL == "0" is false by type casting:

<?php
$var = 0;
switch((string)$var) 
{
    case "" : echo 'a'; break; // This tests for NULL or empty string   
    default : echo 'b'; break; // Everything else, including zero
}
// Output: 'b'
?>

Live Demo

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1  
Then what's the point of switch? Fall-through? –  strager Aug 19 '10 at 19:48
    
Well, there are other circumstances (not just with NULLs) that I'd like this to work with. –  Aaron Yodaiken Aug 19 '10 at 19:49
1  
This will not work! This is equivalent to if ($var == is_null($var)) which will never be true (if $var is NULL, it'll be NULL == true). –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 19 '10 at 19:50
    
@Daniel - Thanks. Looks like it can't be done without some sort of work around :( –  Peter Ajtai Aug 19 '10 at 20:35

make switch use === comparison not == comparison In PHP

Unfortunately switch uses loose comparison and as far as I know there's no way to change that.

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Nope. From the manual page:

Note that switch/case does loose comparision.

If you only have two conditions, use an if like your second example. Otherwise, check for NULL first and switch on the other possibilities:

if (is_null($var))
{
  return 'a';
}

switch ($var)
{
    // ...
}
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This is not possible.

You can, however, put the if statements inside the switch:

switch($var) {
    // Loose cases here

    case 0:
        if($var === NULL) {
            return 'a';
        }

        // Fall through

    default:
        return 'b';
}

Or simply:

switch($var) {
    // Loose cases here

    default:
        if($var === NULL) {
            return 'a';
        }

        return 'b';
}
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5  
At that point why bother with the switch? You could even do `switch (true) { case $var === null: ... } –  ircmaxell Aug 19 '10 at 19:51
    
@ircmaxell, I assumed the OP wants fall-through logic or otherwise a reason to use switch beyond strict checking at times. –  strager Aug 19 '10 at 20:02

One way you could do this is to do what I think of as a backwards switch (there may be a more official name for it). The idea is that you put true or false at the top and then your conditionals in the case statements.

switch(true)
{
  case ($var === NULL):
    return 'a';
    break;
  case ($var === 0):
    return 'b';
    break;
  default:
    return 'c';
}
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8  
what's the point of this vs just an if/elseif block? –  Aaron Yodaiken Aug 19 '10 at 19:53
1  
There's no point of doing this, and if you want to check against any other values the syntax will get pretty awkward. –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 19 '10 at 19:54
11  
Nothing really other than coding style, the end result will be the same. I think switches look a little tidier if you have a large number of conditions. I'd rather look at 10 cases than if/elseif/elseif/elseif etc. –  Greg W Aug 19 '10 at 19:57
3  
On second consideration, I'm liking this. –  Peter Ajtai Aug 19 '10 at 20:33
1  
I look back on this answer of mine and find it a bit nutty, which is ironic because people keep voting it up. –  Greg W Mar 23 '13 at 16:58

You can also switch on the type of the variable:

switch (gettype($var)) {
...
}
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Bad idea - From the docs: Never use gettype() to test for a certain type, since the returned string may be subject to change in a future version. In addition, it is slow too, as it involves string comparison. Instead, use the is_* functions. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 18 '10 at 17:57
    
If gettype() changes that would make the function useless and the language less reliable. Using is_* doesn't answer the question about the switch. For the rest I agree :) –  greg Mar 1 '12 at 15:07

Not with switch - it only does so called "loose" comparisons. You can always replace it with a if/else if block, using ===.

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are you referring to your experience or documentation? If the later, please post a link –  TMS Jan 26 '12 at 12:15
    
Already linked :) –  Adam Wright Jan 26 '12 at 12:16
1  
You actually can do this with switch (see my answer) although I do think that if-else is better for this particular job. –  DaveRandom Jan 26 '12 at 12:21
    
A lot of good answers, sorry I can only pick 1. I went with if/elseif thanks everyone. –  yar matie Jan 26 '12 at 12:27

Switch statement in php does loose comparisons only (==) see http://www.php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php

Use if/elseif/else if you need strict comparisons.

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Presumably you are switching on the variable and expecting integers. Why not simply check the integer status of the variable beforehand using is_int($val) ?

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You can do this:

<?php

  $myVar = 1;

  switch (TRUE) {
    case $myVar === 1.0:
      echo "It's a float!";
      break;
    case $myVar === 1:
      echo "It's an int!";
      break;
  }

Although when you start doing things like this, it may be less confusing to the program flow to replace it with an if-else.

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$myVar = 0; *sadface* –  salathe Jan 26 '12 at 12:27
    
@salathe <facepalm> sorry, corrected. –  DaveRandom Jan 26 '12 at 12:31
    
Not really - this is loosely comparing the variable with the boolean generated by the comparison. It's working here as you picked a value for myVar that is loosely equal to true. Consider the code at codepad.org/humkHv4P. This prints "Default case" even though myVar is 0 (Edit: Ah, you changed the condition. Now it's just an alternative syntax for if/else, with extra overhead :) –  Adam Wright Jan 26 '12 at 12:33
    
@salathe I know, which is why my code now switches TRUE - this fixes the problem. –  DaveRandom Jan 26 '12 at 12:34
    
@DaveRandom thanks for editing the answer, no more sadness or palms for our faces (though, using switch for this is horrible). –  salathe Jan 26 '12 at 13:13

I just use

$var === null and $var = -1; // since switch is not type-safe
switch ( $var ) {
    case 0:
        # this tests for zero/empty string/false
        break;
    case -1:
        # this tests for null
        break;
}

I think this still looks very readable if the comment starting with // is left behind (and the ones starting with # are probably best deleted).

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Switch/Case in PHP can become tricky and cause unexpected problems with the logic in your application.

Here is a brief explanation how tricky it might be: http://www.codedwell.com/post/33/loose-comparison-in-php-example-of-breakable-functionality

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One of the best way is to check NULL value by using is_null

<?php
echo getValue();
function getValue()
{
    $var = 0;   
    switch(true) {
        case is_null($var) : return 'a'; break;
        default : return 'b'; break;
    }
}
?>
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