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Recently I needed to do weighted random selection of elements from a list, both with and without replacement. While there are well known and good algorithms for unweighted selection, and some for weighted selection without replacement (such as modifications of the resevoir algorithm), I couldn't find any good algorithms for weighted selection with replacement. I also wanted to avoid the resevoir method, as I was selecting a significant fraction of the list, which is small enough to hold in memory.

Does anyone have any suggestions on the best approach in this situation? I have my own solutions, but I'm hoping to find something more efficient, simpler, or both.

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It's hard to agree with a posting like this. It's slightly better to ask the question, then post your answer so we can upvote your answer or provide a better/different answer. –  S.Lott Dec 9 '08 at 13:56
    
Your m in the description is n in the code, correct? –  ShreevatsaR Dec 9 '08 at 15:20
    
Refactored as S.Lott suggested –  Nick Johnson Dec 9 '08 at 17:06
    
ShreevatsaR: Yes, you're right. Fixed. –  Nick Johnson Dec 9 '08 at 17:07
    
I've improved my answer, I hope that helps. –  John with waffle Dec 10 '08 at 1:03
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5 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

One of the fastest ways to make many with replacement samples from an unchanging list is the alias method. The core intuition is that we can create a set of equal-sized bins for the weighted list that can be indexed very efficiently through bit operations, to avoid a binary search. It will turn out that, done correctly, we will need to only store two items from the original list per bin, and thus can represent the split with a single percentage.

Let's us take the example of five equally weighted choices, (a:1, b:1, c:1, d:1, e:1)

To create the alias lookup:

  1. Normalize the weights such that they sum to 1. (a:0.2 b:0.2 c:0.2 d:0.2 e:0.2) This is the probability of choosing each weight.

  2. Find the smallest power of 2 greater than or equal to the number of variables, and create this number of partitions, |p|. Each partition represents a probability mass of 1/|p|. In this case, we create 8 partitions, each able to contain 0.125.

  3. Take the variable with the least remaining weight, and place as much of it's mass as possible in an empty partition. In this example, we see that 'a' fills the first partition. (p1{a|null,1.0},p2,p3,p4,p5,p6,p7,p8) with (a:0.075, b:0.2 c:0.2 d:0.2 e:0.2)

  4. If the partition is not filled, take the variable with the most weight, and fill the partition with that variable.

Repeat steps 3 and 4, until none of the weight from the original partition need be assigned to the list.

For example, if we run another iteration of 3 and 4, we see

(p1{a|null,1.0},p2{a|b,0.6},p3,p4,p5,p6,p7,p8) with (a:0, b:0.15 c:0.2 d:0.2 e:0.2) left to be assigned

At runtime:

  1. Get a U(0,1) random number, say binary 0.001100000

  2. bitshift it lg2(p), finding the index partition. Thus, we shift it three, yielding 001.1, or position 1, and thus partition 2.

  3. If the partition is split, use the decimal portion of the shifted random number to decide the split. In this case, the value is 0.5, and 0.5<0.6, so return a.

Here is some code and another explanation, but unfortunately it doesn't use the bitshifting technique, nor have I actually verified it.

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Sorry to say your explanation here is a bit unclear, but the linked page describes it in more detail - thanks! It certainly is a rather cool algorithm, and seems like it fits the bill. :) –  Nick Johnson Dec 9 '08 at 22:53
    
Yes, I was at work, and I wanted to hammer it out. I'll expand on this in the near future. Glad you found it helpful, even so. :) –  John with waffle Dec 9 '08 at 23:39
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after running another iteration of 3 and 4, isn't 0 left in a, since you assigned it all to p2? –  Eli Bendersky Jan 23 '10 at 13:53
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The bitwise trick is neat, but keep in mind that the random number used has to be large enough to select a partition and to select a value within that partition. I'm not sure how to calculate the required number of bits needed to calculate the 2nd part, but one should make sure they have enough bits... (for example, on a 32-bit machine with 2^32 partitions, you're going to need more bits than a single random number!) I just use two random numbers for each sampling. –  Ryan Marcus Jun 25 '12 at 23:45
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Here is a Ruby implementation of the Walker Alias method as well: github.com/cantino/walker_method –  Andrew Mar 5 '13 at 7:21
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I'd recommend you start by looking at section 3.4.2 of Donald Knuth's Seminumerical Algorithms.

If your arrays are large, there are more efficient algorithms in chapter 3 of Principles of Random Variate Generation by John Dagpunar. If your arrays are not terribly large or you're not concerned with squeezing out as much efficiency as possible, the simpler algorithms in Knuth are probably fine.

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I just took a look at section 3.4.2, and it covers only unbiased selection with and without replacement - there's no mention made of weighted selection. –  Nick Johnson Dec 9 '08 at 16:25
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Here's what I came up with for weighted selection without replacement:

def WeightedSelectionWithoutReplacement(l, n):
  """Selects without replacement n random elements from a list of (weight, item) tuples."""
  l = sorted((random.random() * x[0], x[1]) for x in l)
  return l[-n:]

This is O(m log m) on the number of items in the list to be selected from. I'm fairly certain this will weight items correctly, though I haven't verified it in any formal sense.

Here's what I came up with for weighted selection with replacement:

def WeightedSelectionWithReplacement(l, n):
  """Selects with replacement n random elements from a list of (weight, item) tuples."""
  cuml = []
  total_weight = 0.0
  for weight, item in l:
    total_weight += weight
    cuml.append((total_weight, item))
  return [cuml[bisect.bisect(cuml, random.random()*total_weight)] for x in range(n)]

This is O(m + n log m), where m is the number of items in the input list, and n is the number of items to be selected.

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That first function is brilliant, but alas it doesn't weight the items correctly. Consider WeightedSelectionWithoutReplacement([(1, 'A'), (2, 'B')], 1). It will choose A with probability 1/4, not 1/3. Hard to fix. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 28 '10 at 14:27
    
Btw, faster but more complex algorithms are in my answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2140787/… –  Jason Orendorff Jan 28 '10 at 14:43
    
Nice find @JasonOrendorff. In fact the difference is quite bad. For weights (1, 2, 3, 4), you'd expect "1" to be chosen 1/10 of the time, but it'll be chosen 1/94 of the time. I really wanted that to work! –  Lawrence Kesteloot Mar 9 '12 at 5:11
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@JasonOrendorff: How did you calculate 1/4? If you have a formula for that, can we invert it and replace the original weights with weights that will give correct results? –  Lawrence Kesteloot Mar 9 '12 at 6:44
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The following is a description of random weighted selection of an element of a set (or multiset, if repeats are allowed) without replacement in O(n) space and O(log n) time.

It consists of implementing a binary search tree, sorted by the elements to be selected, where each node of the tree contains:

  1. the element itself (element)
  2. the un-normalized weight of the element (elementweight), and
  3. the sum of all the un-normalized weights of the left-child node and all of its children (leftbranchweight).
  4. the sum of all the un-normalized weights of the right-child node and all of its chilren (rightbranchweight).

Then we randomly select an element from the BST by descending down the tree. A rough description of the algorithm follows. The algorithm is given a node of the tree. Then the values of leftbranchweight, rightbranchweight, and elementweight of node is summed, and the weights are divided by this sum, resulting in the values leftbranchprobability, rightbranchprobability, and elementprobability, respectively. Then a random number between 0 and 1 (randomnumber) is obtained.

  • if the number is less than elementprobability,
    • remove the element from the BST as normal, updating leftbranchweight and rightbranchweight of all the necessary nodes, and return the element.
  • else if the number is less than (elementprobability + leftbranchweight)
    • recurse on leftchild (run the algorithm using leftchild as node)
  • else
    • recurse on rightchild

DISCLAIMER: The algorithm is rough, and a treatise on the proper implementation of a BST is not attempted here; rather, it is hoped that this answer will help those who really need fast weighted selection without replacement (like I do).

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A simple approach that hasn't been mentioned here is one proposed in Efraimidis and Spirakis. In python you could select m items from n >= m weighted items with strictly positive weights stored in weights, returning the selected indices, with:

import heapq
import math
import random

def WeightedSelectionWithoutReplacement(weights, m):
    elt = [(math.log(random.random()) / weights[i], i) for i in range(len(weights))]
    return [x[1] for x in heapq.nlargest(m, elt)]

This is very similar in structure to the first approach proposed by Nick Johnson. Unfortunately, that approach is biased in selecting the elements (see the comments on the method). Efraimidis and Spirakis proved that their approach is equivalent to random sampling without replacement in the linked paper.

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