Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Sometimes, I find myself in a situation where valid files are made invalid by doubling the contents, placing ======= in the middle, <<<<<<< .mine at the beginning and <<<<<<< .r1276 at the end. This results in unbuildable projects:

<<<<<<< .mine
using System;
using System.Data;

namespace MyNamespace
{
     class Xyz
     //... a lot more code ...
}=======
using System;
using System.Data;

namespace MyNamespace
{
     class Xyz
     //... a lot more code ...
}
>>>>>>> .r1276

It seems to want to say "the first part is mine the second part belongs revision 1276", but why does it do this and more importantly, how do I prevent it? I use AnkhSVN and Visual SVN / Tortoise from Visual Studio. I probably clicked the wrong buttons, but wdon't know which I did and would gladly hear from someone more knowledgeable with SVN how I managed to get my files to messed up and what to do to prevent it next time around.

share|improve this question
1  
I find that I have this problem if I update a file that has conflicts in it instead of merging the files properly. I have the problem using Eclipse with Subclipse though so I would assume its just part of the way SVN works. I don't know of any other way to avoid it other than to merge the files properly instead. This may not be relevant to you though. –  Ross Aug 19 '10 at 22:21
    
@Rosco: that might be a part of what has happened, I remember I did do updates, but only when it happens again I may be certain of the order of events that caused it. –  Abel Aug 19 '10 at 23:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You have merging conflicts that need to be resolved. TortoiseSVN will show these files in a conflicted state, with the "Gibberish" being the way that SVN tracks the attempted merge information.

Do not alter the files manually. Use TortoiseSVN "Resolve conflicts" and the UI it provides to resolve these conflicts.

These conflicts arise after two developers have edited them and are trying to check-in their changes and the two files cannot be automatically merged.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds reasonable. Your edit on the "two developers" is very well possible in this particular situation. So how do I continue, take a file comparer and match them side by side? –  Abel Aug 19 '10 at 22:18
    
The file will have a little yellow dot with a ! in the icon. Right-click, go to the TortoiseSVN menu, and find the "Resolve conflicts" item (or a similarly named menu item, I'm going from memory here) You'll get a Conflict resolution UI that is fairly intuitive. –  Dave White Aug 19 '10 at 22:21
    
Ah, that where it gets fishy. The exclamation mark isn't there nor are the menus there that you talk of. I may have inadvertently changed the file, checked in again, changed it again etc before I really noticed what was going on. May that have caused the conflict-trigger to disappear? –  Abel Aug 19 '10 at 22:24
    
Is TortoiseSVN installed correctly would be my first question? You wouldn't (shouldn't?) have been able to commit the file in a conflicted state. One thing that might solve this problem quickly wouuld be to just get the latest out of the repository, re-make the changes that are missing and re-commit the file into SVN. –  Dave White Aug 19 '10 at 22:28
    
What I think happened is that when it was in a conflicted state, I, or someone else, tried to check it in with other means (i.e., if the conflict came through Tortoise, check in through AnkhSVN). Not sure that would work (I've had conflict before, and they need to be resolved). Ok, just checked. The version in BASE is indeed just like I described in the question :S –  Abel Aug 19 '10 at 22:32

@Dave White gave the definitive answer (+1), and I have an additional tip, for what it's worth.... Prior to doing a get, I like to review my local changes to see if there is anything that I really should revert. I program in Delphi, so I typically have lots of .bdsproj and .res files that have silly modifications such as autoinc revisions, minor path differences, etc.. (Our "official" revision numbers come from our automated build tool, so the local ones are moot). And of course, these are lines in the file that would directly conflict with any other updates caused by the automated build, since I did my last get. By reverting my unimportant local changes prior to the "get" (svn update), I avoid dozens of senseless .mine problems.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.