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I have a class similar to the one below. How do I call my init method when the object is created? I don't want to have to create an instance of my object then call initialize like I do below.

var myObj = new myClass(2, true);
myObj.init();

function myClass(v1, v2) 
{
    // public vars
    this.var1 = v1;

    // private vars
    var2 = v2;

    // pub methods
    this.init = function() {
        // do some stuff        
    };

    // private methods
    someMethod = function() {
        // do some private stuff
    };
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

NB. Constructor function names should start with a capital letter to distinguish them from ordinary functions, e.g. MyClass instead of myClass.

Either you can call init from your constructor function:

var myObj = new MyClass(2, true);

function MyClass(v1, v2) 
{
    // ...

    // pub methods
    this.init = function() {
        // do some stuff        
    };

    // ...

    this.init(); // <------------ added this
}

Or more simply you could just copy the body of the init function to the end of the constructor function. No need to actually have an init function at all if it's only called once.

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Thanks. I actually tried calling 'this.init();' before posting, but I was making the call before the function declaration so that is why it would not work. =] –  Ryan Sampson Aug 19 '10 at 23:10
    
How should I do the same if I define my object simply by var obj = {init: function(){...}}? How should I call it? –  Eugene May 27 '11 at 11:12
    
@Eugene - What's wrong with: var makeObj = function(x, y) { return { a: x + y }; } It's a function that creates an object and performs whatever one-time initialization you require before returning it. Sometimes called a factory function. –  Daniel Earwicker May 27 '11 at 13:51
    
Well parentlly nothing wrong with it, but had a huge object which was already defined with braces and it wasn't working properly. Now eveything is fine. No problem. :) –  Eugene May 27 '11 at 15:28

See below for one possible answer, and some corrections to your code.

function myClass(v1, v2) 
{
    // public vars
    this.var1 = v1;

    // private vars
    // use var to actually make this private
    var var2 = v2;

    // pub methods
    this.init = function() {
        // do some stuff        
    };

    // private methods
    // this will be private as though it had been declared with var
    function someMethod() {
        // do some private stuff
    };

    //call init
    this.init();
}
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Thanks, that was a typo when converting my real class to a simple example for the question. –  Ryan Sampson Aug 19 '10 at 23:11

Just add

this.init();

to your myClass function.

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