Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

A frequently answered question, I'm afraid but I am pretty much in the dark on this.

Within my view controller I have the following method to switch back and forward between two images a total of 5 times

- (IBAction)cycle{

 BOOL select1;
 select1=YES;

 UIImage *image1 = [UIImage imageNamed:@"image1.png"];
 UIImage *image2 = [UIImage imageNamed:@"image2.png"];

 for (int i=0; i<5; i++) {

  if (select1){
   [imageview setImage:image1];
  } else {
   [imageview setImage:image2];
  }

  [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:1.0];

  [imageview setNeedsDisplay];

 }
}

The problem is that the setNeedsDisplay message does not work within the loop and the view is only updated when the method quits.

Is there any thing I can do here? Is the approach feasible or am I completely down the wrong track. This is very much a test program (I am new to this language) but it would be useful to control something like this programmatically. The next step app will implement randomly changing times between picture changes.

Can anyone help me on this?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Wrong track. Calling

[NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:1.0];

Is only trying to put the main thread asleep. The problem is that this is the thread that's actually does the drawing. You need to end what you're doing and give control bakc to the NS runtime so that it can update gui elements.

Try using NSTimer to create a scheduled timer. Have it repeat with the time interval that you want. All that you then have to do is set the image:

if (select1){     
   [imageview setImage:image1];     
  } else {     
   [imageview setImage:image2];     
  } 

there's no need for

[imageview setNeedsDisplay];

As the imageview will handle that for itself.

share|improve this answer
    
It's slightly more complicated than that. The main thread does the "displaying" (-[CALayer display] or CALayerDelegate's -displayLayer). When you return to the run loop, UIKit calls CATransactionCommit() or something, which "displays" all your layers (rendering them into the CALayer.content property). CoreAnimation then picks up the changes, and the results are composited in the CoreAnimation thread and on the GPU. When that's done, CoreAnimation does a buffer-flip and you see the results on screen. Lots of buffering everywhere! – tc. Aug 20 '10 at 0:06
    
@tc: my hat's off to you. That's an awesome level of knowledge that you have there. I'm jealous and I'm off to do some reading. – No one in particular Aug 20 '10 at 0:14
    
Wonderful. All works now. All make sense and have learnt a lot, i.e. about NSTimer. setNeedsDisplay is indeed redundant. Many thanks for this. – drw Aug 20 '10 at 22:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.